Technical Help from the Solid Axle Corvette Club

 

 

To submit a technical question regarding a 1953 to 1962 Corvette, simply email
sacctech@solidaxle.org

*Note: If you are using an Apple iPhone, you will have to hold down on the blue letters. Then a box comes up and you 
will need to select "New Mail Message".  You should be fine then, your email question will go to it's intended mailbox.

*In the subject box you need to put "sacctech/ (your SACC
membership number)".  Example: sacctech/1234
If you are not a member, your question will not be excluded, however, it won't get priority.

Disclaimer:
Our officers enjoy answering questions about your Corvette. Please keep in mind before asking questions that we are not qualified or certified to diagnose problems you may be experiencing with your Corvette. It is recommended that an A.S.E. (Automotive Service Excellence) certified automotive technician diagnose the vehicle for you. This way you get an accurate diagnoses on the problem and an understanding of the parts necessary to remedy the problem.  The experts render opinions.  Remember, the Solid Axle Corvette Club does not endorse any supplier, manufacturer, or place of repair.

Keep in mind that members enjoy a wealth of information via the SACC quarterly magazine, On Solid Ground.  Here are some of the topics contained in the Spring, 2008 issue:

-Insulate Your Solid Axle

-1956 Goodyear Corvette

-Harmonic Balancer Re-Install

-Six Cylinder Corner

-Will We Need NOS Engine Oil for out Old Cars?

-The Willet Run Garage

-The Marketplace - Member Classified

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07/08/2020

It seems like everyone is having questions regarding their 1962 at this time.  I have had mine now for 45 years and I have just changed my front wheel bearings to roller bearing that i purchased from Zip.  My problem is that even though I pushed the inner races into the hub to the shoulder, I can't seem to keep the inner bearing seal in place easily while I slide the hub onto the spindle.  If it isn't slid on smoothly the bearing seal comes off and it can be floating in there and not allowing you to adjust the wheel bearing properly or even to know that it hasn't stayed in place.  Has anyone else ever had this problem, or does anyone have a solution to this problem?

Thank you,
Michael 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River VP:

Compare the new seal to the old seal, are the dimensions the same?

I had a similar problem some years ago on a different car, the seal was "similar" but just enough difference it would not stay in place.
I bought from my normal parts store, they knew me so they worked with me to find out what the problem was. Turned out the new seal was actually made for a completely different car. It was very similar but did not work. We looked at several different boxes until we found the correct seals. 


Verle

 

 

 

 

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07/07/2020

VIN number check. We have a 61 vette left to us, no title, no tag on steering column. I understand there might be a stamp on the frame under the drivers seat. Is there a way to check this without removing the body or cutting hole in the floor. Thanks for any input on this matter. 


From: John Spencer, Red River Chapter Advisor:  My 58 has the VIN stamped on the frame.  It is located under the driver's seat area on the top of the frame.  Depending on how much space you have between the frame and underbody, you can see it with  a light and mirror.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  I checked my VIN stamp on a 1957.  It is located at midlength of the door.  You will need to loosen all the body bolts (12), and remove the five- left side nuts.  Put a 18" piece of 2X4 on the floor between the frame and rocker panel.  Jack up the body about 1 1/2 inches.  Clean the top of the frame in that area and use a mirror taped to the floor under the frame rail.  With the correct lighting, you should be able to take photos.

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Does the car have the original engine? If so the last 5 digits of the vin will be stamped on the pad along with the engine assembly date.
However, with the tag missing it may have been a theft recovery and the original engine may be long gone.

Chip Werstein .

 

 

 

 

 


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

In addition to trying to get a photograph, which will be a mirror image, not a positive, I suggest that a pencil rubbing be attempted.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  

I was able to read my frame stamp by inserting a wood wedge to lift the floor board a little. Used sand paper to clean the frame, wiped it off and could read VIN with mirror and light. Might help to unbolt the driver seat from floor to make it a little more flexible.

Verle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

I had the same problem on my '54. In CA they have to verify the "original" VIN  # before the issue plates. Joe is right, the VIN # is stamped on the top of the frame just below the mid of the drivers seat. It is about 1" clearance between the frame and the body fiberglass. I did not raise the body and inserted my finger and found the stamping. I sanded the # and put chalk dust on the # and flat wiped it clean with a cloth. Then as Joe said, I took a dental mirror and a flashlight to explore. I was able to read the # and I got an "adda- boy" from the inspector at the CHP! 
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have owned my '62 for over 50 years.  The top is rarely used.  I would like to know what I can lubricate the bows with that won't stain the soft top.

Thank you ,
Bud

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Bud,
WD-40 brand makes a  spray White Lithium grease that has a 6 inch application nozzle that I used to lube the rotating joints in my soft top frame.

Use gentle pressure on the release button, put a rag behind the frame to catch the overflow and wipe off the excess grease.
Don't overdo it and you shouldn't have an issue with the grease staining the top. Remember, it's easier to add more grease periodically that deal with the collateral damage of using too much.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Bud:  The absolutely critical point needing lubrication is the pivot point over the center of the side windows.  Without lubrication, this joint will seize up and bend or break in two the section that goes to the front header when the top is raised.  I do not recommend any spray grease because it is very hard to get grease to work its way into the joints.  I use 30 weight engine oil in a 20 cc hypodermic.  This arrangement allows you to exactly pinpoint where you are applying the oil.  Thirty weight oil is thin enough that it will easily penetrate all the joints without getting on the top fabric.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7/01/2020

My 62 had the typical gasoline smell.  Since it’s almost 60 years old, I decided to replace the gas tank.  I checked for leaks in the new tank by filling it with water.  No leaks.  Then I looked at Joe Calcagno’s website (RareCorvettes.com).  One of the things he does is to take out the filler tube, put the cap on, turn it upside down and fill it with water.  Good way to find leaks.  Luckily, I had 3 gas caps to try.  One vented and two unvented.  Here is what I found.

1.  New gas filler tubes can be defective. I sent one back and got another - still bad.  They leaked at the joint between the tube body and the fitting on the end.  The new ones weren’t seal welded, only tack welded.  Totally unacceptable.  After going through two of them, I decided to use JB Weld all around the joint on the outside of one of the new the filler tubes.  It worked!  Second time I’ve used JB Weld to fix something (last time it was the weld on the small aluminum fitting on the bottom of the expansion tank).  Works great.  I love that stuff.

2. Most gas caps leak.  I used the one that leaked the least. It was an unvented one.  I then JB Welded the rivet connection on the inside of the gas cap.  The rivet holds the handle on but it is a mechanical connection that gas can leak through.  To finally stop all leaking, I made another rubber gasket to go over the existing gasket on the inside of the gas cap.  (I just found this out after installing everything and still smelling gas.  Even a tiny leak at the gas cap really smells).  The gas cap really fits tight now.   Did some right turn 360’s with a full tank of gas.  No leaks.  No smells.  BTW, I’ve had an old inner tube for years that I’ve used to make custom gaskets.  Very handy.

3. Installing the fuel sending unit is tricky.  If you don’t do it right, it leaks too.  I made the mistake of over tightening the screws holding the unit on the tank.  The gaskets deformed and leaked.  I also made a mistake by installing the ground wire on one of the screws, the way you’re supposed to.  If you install the ground wire terminal on the screw, you would need an extra gasket.  The steel on steel connection between the terminal and the tank, or between the terminal and the screw head, leaks.  Joe Calcagno recommends soldering the ground wire to the top of the sending unit, instead.  I didn’t have any luck doing this so I cut off the terminal, stripped the end of the wire and wrapped the bare wires around the metal fuel tube on the unit.  Then I used a hose clamp to hold it in place.


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Charles.  I got my first 62 in 1966, and currently have two 62's and one 60.  No fumes in any on them.  The proper and easy fix is to completely seal the gas tank cover.  There are three large holes in the fiberglass area under the gas tank area.  The area under the gas tank is a high pressure area when the car is driven and any fumes from a leaky sender gasket, a broken vent line hose, or the hose connecting the filler tube to the gas tank will get into the car if the gas tank cover isn't completely sealed.  Use 3M Strip Caulk to seal the edges of the tank cover perimeter to the car body.  Strip Caulk is a black clay-like material that remains pliable to allow easy removal of the gas tank cover if needed.  Strip Caulk is available in most automotive paint stores.

Gasoline leaks in the gas filler area, as well as rain water, drain directly under the car via a rubber hose that connects to a fiberglass nipple in the gas tank area under the drain hole to a hole in the gas tank area floor directly under the drain hole..  If this hose is missing or broken, then fumes from the gasoline filler area will end up in the gas tank area and into the passenger area if the gas tank cover is not completely sealed, as described above. 

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

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06/24/20

Hello.  We just recently purchased a 1960 with the 4-speed.  The speedometer does not work.  The cable turns at the speedometer, but only in reverse.  I haven't looked at the driven gear yet, but was just wondering if anyone else has seen this issue.
Thanks,

Neil

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

T-10 and early M-20, 21 use a steel drive gear and plastic driven gear.  The driven gear can wear and the teeth are contacting (marginally) in reverse, and the contact in forward is so little the speedo needle does not move.  Try replacing the driven gear with one that is the same diameter.

If that does not work- The other issue is a mismatch with the drive gear.  There are two drive gear diameters and two driven gear diameters.  See the March 2020 Solid Scoop for my article on speedo gears.

 

 

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06/14/2020


I would like to know the correct torque specifications for the flywheel and pressure plate bolts on a 265 cu in engine.  Also is locktite recommended on these bolts?
Thanks,
Mike

 

From: Joe Lemay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

The specs I use are 60 for the flywheel and 35 for the pressure plate.  Use medium threadlocker.  Do not use permanent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: John Spencer, Red River Chapter Advisor:  

Flywheel torque = 65 ft lb,  clutch pressure plate = 35 ft lb.  (source - GM Chassis Service Manual)
Locktite not recommended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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06/13/2020

I just put a new clutch pressure plate and flywheel in my 62 Vette. I have the transmission about 1 inch from being up to the bell housing and it is hung up. Any help?


From: Verle Randolph, Red River chapter VP:  The usual problem is misalignment of the clutch plate. If it is not accurately centered on the throw out bearing the input shaft will hold the transmission an inch away.
This is how many transmission ears are broken, someone tries to pull the transmission to the bell housing with the bolts.

Remove the transmission and look through the center of the hole and look at the clutch plate hole and the throw out bearing alignment.

Solution is to remove bell housing, loosen the clutch plate bolts until you can move the clutch plate and center it. The alignment tool that comes with the clutch kit is usually plastic and does not do a good job of centering. It often (usually???) allows the clutch plate to slip down just enough to cause your problem.

If you have an input shaft from any Chevrolet standard transmission they work better. If not, do your best to center the clutch plate with the alignment tool as you tighten the lower two bolts a little. Move the tool in and out. when centered it should move fairly easy. Keep doing this as you tighten bolts around the clutch plate to make sure the tool moves. Also, remove the tool and inspect the alignment visually.

It is a bother but it must be done.

I have bought many very good 4-speeds with broken ears for a cheap price.

Verle


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Lee,
you changed the flywheel. Did you check to make sure the nose bushing fit the transmission input shaft?
1 inch is about the depth of the nose bushing.

If you did and it fit, does the clutch spline fit the input shaft freely or was it sticky/tight?

Is the clutch spline symmetrical relative to the plates?  If not, the new clutch plate could be backward.

Did you use an input shaft installation tool to align the flywheel/bushing/ clutch plate/pressure plate assembly before tightening & torqueing the pressure plate to the flywheel?

Good luck on your installation R & R,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

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06/09/2020

Next question: I replaced all 22 front suspension/steering joints when I did the full restoration a few years ago.  Now, 3 of the 22 joints will not accept new grease and I have confirmed the zerk fitting is passing grease by removing it and confirmed grease does get through the zerk.  So something appears to be blocking grease passage.  One is inboard tie rod joint the other two are the LH and RH aft  upper control arm joint.

Ideas on what I should try to resolve the issue?

Thank you,
Mike

 


From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

I am having the same issue with the four lower inner fittings.  I have not disassembled the joints but the zerk fittings will pass grease.  This is a complete rebuild done in 2014 and there is about 5000 miles on the car.
I grease it with the car jacked high enough to get under with a creeper.  If I hold the grease gun fitting to the joint as I do for all the other fittings, all the grease gets rejected.  If I brace myself and push the gun as hard as I can into the fitting, I can get a small amount of grease to come out of the joint.  I am pushing the gun into the fitting with a lot of pressure; as much as I can create.
I have not tried an air pressure grease gun.  I would expect to get more grease into the fitting as I can push the gun with both hands and not have to operate the lever.  With air pressure and two hands, I hope to clear whatever it is that is creating the blockage.

 

 

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  I have had this problem before on a Solid Axle and another vehicle.
One thing that helped me was to remove the zerk and squirt some lubricating oil in the hole. Jack car up, remove tire, jack stand support. I found better results by squirting oil several times over two or three days.

My theory is the grease  hardens over time, possibly by losing volatile ingredients. The lubricating oil softens the grease making things work better and allowing grease to be added through the zerk.

Only other option I know is to dismantle and redo.

Verle

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Mike:  I have six early GM cars (three of them are C-1's) with the kind of suspension our Corvettes have.  All the A-arm  joints are "metal to metal" with very tight tolerances when they are new, like yours are.  When the joints get some wear, in my experience, it becomes easier to inject grease into them due to the increased tolerances.  I have some joints where it takes all my strength to inject grease into them, but slowly some grease expels from the back of the joint indicating that the joint is getting properly greased.  That is all you can and need to do with the difficult joints.  We are told by GM to grease these suspensions every 1000 miles.  Last resort - Go to a fitness center and train to improve your upper body strength, and that will make it easier to grease your car..

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

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06/08/2020

I can't figure out how to put the chrome trim pieces on the glove box door.  These two pieces are approx. 12 inches long, 1 inch wide and are positioned vertically when the door is closed. 
 
I've had this car since 1973 and a '56 before it for 7 years.  I've assembled this door twice before when painting it but can't seem to get it together this time. 
 
Thanks for your help,
Jim


From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

The seat separator panel is attached to hinge by the middle bolt holes of the panel and the top holes of the hinge.  It uses #8 clutch head screws.  These screws would be painted body color.  The moldings are attached with four- #8 philips screws through the bottom and top holes.  
Parts suppliers will have the trim hardware to retain the molding.  It is the usual hardware to retain body molding.  Paragon has the typical hardware.
The short lower stainless steel trim moldings are bolted and retained with hex nuts and star washers.



 

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06/07/2020
After draining the radiator and engine block, how do I install 16 new quarts of coolant? It only seems to accept about 10 quarts.
Thank you,
Michael

From: John Spencer, Red River Chapter Advisor:  Even if you open Block Drains (if you have them) you don't completely drain the block.  If you're wanting to remove all the old coolant, you have to flush the block.  This will dilute what coolant is remaining in the block and if you flush it long enough - replace the residual coolant with clear water.  When adding coolant back - simply anticipate the amount of clear water in the block to establish your desired concentration of coolant-to-water.


Note: Heater core will hold 1 Qt. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  When filling an empty radiator and block you will have a lot of trapped air. Pour in as much as you can. Leaving the radiator cap off, start the engine and let it run, when the thermostat opens the level will fall. Keep pouring in water/antifreeze until it is full. You may have to top off a few times. After a drive where the engine is thoroughly warmed up. Turn off, let cool down then check the water level, ad as necessary. You need to open the heater control valve so it can drain or fill.

The Corvette Servicing Guide -P 14-9 at bottom, says 16 qt w/o heater, 17 qt with heater.


Verle

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Chapter Advisor:  

Mike,

Verle is .most likely correct in his diagnosis of your problem. I have been aware of potential air lock problems when filling cooling systems for many years but have never experienced it. I drill two 1/8 inch holes  in the thermostat thin metal mounting flange. This prevents the system from being sealed up which allows trapped air to escape thereby preventing air locks. Give it a try.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

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06/05/2020

My question pertains to 56-57 Corvettes, if the Saginaw transmissions were cast in Saginaw where were they assembled?, St. Louis.    Same with the rear ends casting in Detroit and assembled in St. Louis, or that is what I read somewhere who knows where do you have any info on that one?

Thanks,

Kermit 

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Although it may be referred to as a Saginaw transmission, there is not such thing.  Muncie 318 transmissions were produced for many years.  The main case that was used in Corvettes was cast in Saginaw.  Passenger car main case was cast in Tonawanda.  There are very few ways to tell them apart.

If you are trying to get your Corvette back to stock appearance, you will want a Saginaw cast case and gears with a 2:20 first gear ratio.  There is also a Muncie 319 that is a 3 speed with overdrive.

That did not answer the question on where it was assembled, but maybe someone has that.

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  

There was a foundry,  Saginaw Metal Casting Operations Saginaw, Michigan  1919 , where cases were cast and assembly was done in the Saginaw Transmission Saginaw, Michigan.

    Metal casting for power trains. Engine Blocks. Crankshafts

    Manual Transmissions, Originally made the Saginaw 3 and 4-Speed manual transmissions.

The old Saginaw plant was torn down in 2019.

I believe the Corvette plant in St Louis did no major assembly on mechanical parts. Those parts, engines, transmissions, rear ends, etc came ready to be installed. The plant did add accessories to those assemblies.

 

Verle

 


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5/31/2020

 


Could you clarify something
 
Re: 1957 Airbox corvettes and exactly what was the factory assembly reference number for the car option
 
There seems to be confusion :
 
All the literature of every type refers to the 1957 Corvette Airbox cars as OPTION : RPO 579E
 


1957 Corvette 'Air Box' Roadster - Chevrolet Pressroommedia.chevrolet.com › sema › engines › 1030-corvette Oct 30, 2017 - Nineteen fifty-seven was a pivotal year for the Chevrolet Corvette. ... models were factory-equipped with the 579E airbox option. Vehicle ...

1957 Corvette Airbox Car - Vette Magazine - Super Chevywww.superchevy.com › Vette › Features
As delivered, the car came with the RPO 579E engine and a long list of other factory-installed pieces that completed the RPO 684 Heavy Duty Racing Suspension etc

The Corvette Restorer Msgazine : 1957 RPO 579E TACHOMETER 9 2 FALL 1982 page 19 in conjunction with Wilson Swilley article. . He says it is from Factory Production specifications

THE FACTORY ASSEMBLY MANUAL JUST SAYS RPO 579 with no letter after it


 
There apparently  references  to RPO 649D being the air-box RPO code in nternal Duntov document. and also on facebook (i.e. registry of Corvette Race cars ) a copy of a dealer invoice for one of the "air-box" corvettes were the line reference on the dealer invoice for the $726.00 air-box option is RPO579D

So what is the correct terminlology :


(a) was RPO 579D the factory reference for just the Air-box option alone

(b) was there an RPO 579E option before the airbox option (note: Noland Adams book: GM instructions for mounting the RPO 579E tachometer)

(c ) was there a change in RPO number during year

THEREFORE QUESTION IS :

What exactly does RPO 649 E reference to in terms of factory documents
What exactly does RPO 649 D reference to in terms of factory documents

Thanks for clarification in this matter

William

 

 

From: Tom Parsons, Red River Chapter FI expert:  

I’ll try to answer the questions as best as I can which were submitted by William Keogh. Can someone add the people which were listed in the original email that are not included. I could not get their address to attach.
BUT, the very first issue that needs to be addressed is RPO579E.
THERE IS NOT, AND THERE NEVER HAS BEEN AN RPO579E---------PERIOD!!!
Somehow, someway, back in the stone ages, SOMEONE incorrectly listed the “Airbox” option as RPO 579E----------------AND IT HAS JUST STUCK ALL THESE YEARS-----------------INCORRECTLY!!! The correct option number for the 1957 Corvette with the fresh air duct for the fuel injector is RPO 579D. That is what it was in the beginning, and always has been. The publications, “Armchair Experts” and subsequent listings for RPO 579E have been WRONG FOR OVER 60yrs!!!!! Back in the 50s when I first became aware of fuel injected Corvettes and in the 70s when I finally got a chance to become involved with FI, the “E” never actually made sense to me, but I could never come up with a reason for it. Fast forward to 2007 and Key Kayser’s books (Vol I and Vol II on fuel injection). For fuel injection aficionados, if you do not have these books, you are missing the boat! Once and for all, Ken has cleared the air regarding RPO 579D (erroneously “E”). Not only does he totally clarify the misconception, but he does it with GM documentation. He also clarifies some additional misconceptions. ALL listings for the fuel injected engines with the hydraulic cam have also been reversed. RPO 579A is the3sp (or manual transmission) RPO 579B is the Powerglide. And an additional support for the 579D as being the correct RPO for the 57 Airbox, the listings for 58-59-60 with a solid lifter car are RPO 579D. More support that RPO 579E for 57 was, and always has been wrong!!!
 
Now, back to RPO 579D. MOST people here probably know that it was more than just a SOLID LIFTER ENGINE with a special duct to direct cooler to the injector. It was a package-------------IT ONLY CAME ONE WAY!  Within the pkg was the air HAND LAID fiberglass air duct for the injector. It only came with a manual transmission (MOST PROBABLY all were 4sp), positraction, NO heater, NO radio, 5.5in (NOT 5.0in) wide wheels, heavy duty brakes, special ducting for direction cooling air to the brakes, 5 instead of 4 leaves in the rear springs, HD front (and shorter) springs, thicker front sway bar, HD shocks (the rear cross member was modified for mounting the rear shocks), a unique FI ignition distributor (908) with a tach drive fitting that turned a plain, AC 8000rpm tachometer which was mounted on the steering column. The tach in the center of the dash was eliminated and the hole was covered  with a front/rear emblem-----------------------WITH ONE EXCEPTION------------ 57 VIN 4007, restored by Bill Connell several years ago, which was the FIRST production built Airbox car, had the hole covered and finished smooth with a piece of fiberglass. There was a ONE ONLY fairing which covered the steering mounted tach. On the assembly line for these VERY FEW special cars, it was determined to be too time consuming and too much trouble to cover the center hole for the regular tach, thus, the use of a front rear emblem to cover the hole.
 
SOOOOOOOOOOOOO, where did I learn all this? Nothing magical. Ken Kayser has so thoroughly and expertly provided these details (AND MUCH MORE) in his books, plus supported it with GM documentation, and as I mentioned above, his books would be a valuable addition to anyone’s Corvette library. When I got his Vol I and started reading it, SO MANY unanswered questions just begin to fall into place----------------------just one example, the 5 Cadillacs with fuel injection and the one Oldsmobile with FI. Of course, I presume everyone knows about the 57-58 Pontiacs with FI which was a regular option.
 
I am not familiar with any option 649D or 649E.

 

 
The number of fresh air ducts (airboxes) built was 50. THERE IS NO SURVIVING GM DRAWINGS OR DOCUMENTATION FOR THEIR CONSTRUCTION, BECAUSE IT GOT DISPOSED OF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Per Ken Kayser. What a shame!!!!!!!!!! Even though 50 airbox ducts were fabricated, only 43 cars were built with an airbox FI pkg. So, where did the other 7 ducts go??? Well SOME of them have been accounted for. One (a 48th car) was factory installed, BUUUUUUUUUUUT, the production order was changed to a 2x4 engine (FI was removed and replaced with 2x4s) and a major portion of the duct was sawed off! (MANY years ago, 70s, it was rumored that car was in Arkansas, I never saw it) That leaves 6 unaccounted ducts. A SACC member (John Neas in Tulsa) has one of the unaccounted for ducts on his 57 FACTORY RPO 579C car. It was delivered to Rosenthal Chevrolet WITHOUT an airbox (and the tach was in the dash). About 2-3wks after delivery to Rosenthal, a complete Airbox pkg was delivered and installed on John’s car. So now that leaves 5 unaccounted for ducts that were fabricated. One of them MAY, repeat, MAY be on my 56. I just do not positively know the actual source of my airbox. I bought it about 30yrs ago from someone--------------AND IT APPEARED TO NEVER HAVE BEEN INSTALLED (NO installation holes were in it).
 
By the way, the fresh air duct (airbox) on the SR2 cars is custom made for those cars. It is totally different from the ducts installed on the production Airbox cars.
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

The picture of the red airbox is my “built” 56 “579D” car. It has all the 57 579D components EXCEPT the ducts going through the rockers for rear brake cooling.

 
I probably have not answered all the questions about the 57 Airbox option, and if there are more questions, I’ll see what I can answer.
 
  
 
Tom Parsons

 

 

 

 

 

 


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5/31/2020

I have a 1962 Corvette 327 340hp 4 speed matching , the car sometimes cuts out while driving, it loses power and powers up again while driving, sometimes it looses power and just quits and will not start until it sits a while and cools down ??

What do I check ?

How do I join your organization ??

 

John


John,
Let's answer the easy question first.
You can join Solid Axle Corvette Club (SACC) by using the following links and submitting your membership application.  https://www.solidaxle.org/https://www.solidaxle.org/forms/SACC-2019-membership-form-a.pdf.

Regarding your car issues, I would suggest a couple things.
1) Use only premium gasoline as a minimum and 100% gasoline 90 octane with lead additive & octane booster as required.
    It sound like your carburetor is "boiling over" and flooding the engine. Higher octane helps solve that.
    Hardened valve seats in the heads eliminates the need for lead additive.
2) Recently, two of our chapter members encountered similar running issues. One made it home, the other got flat-bedded.
    In both cars, a 1959 & a 1960, the coil was defective and ran perfectly after that one part change.
 


Good luck with your car,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

I had the same problem.  Would let it sit when hot. Then it would start.  One day after cooling, it would not start, and there was no fuel in the carburetor.  The fuel pump was failing and finally needed to be replaced.

When you replace it, use the original configuration inlet and outlet (and maybe original part number pump).  It is a good opportunity to correct some other items with the fuel lines if needed.

 

 

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  

For a cheap and easy test install a known good ignition coil and see if that makes any difference.

Water in the fuel can cause the engine stall, then restart while still moving.

As mentioned, lack of fuel. Could be fuel pump, partial blockage in tank or line.

Verle

 

 

 

 


From: John Spencer, Red River Chapter Advisor:  

This could be a number of problems, but from your description - I would suspect the coil.  A defective coil will often fail in one of two modes, or both; 1) the broken coil (wire coil) becomes intermittent - it will quit firing for no reason and then start firing as sudden as it stopped. 2) as it heats up it will fail and cease to fire until it cools down and remakes contact.  This is an easy fix - replace the coil and see if the problem goes away, if not at least you know you've eliminated one possibility.  All the other possibilities are not so easily fixed.  They are probably in the carburetion or fuel delivery.  Things to investigate;  does the stall occur in a turn or at a totally random time. (Left turn is carburetor), when the stall occurs - does it seem to be the lack of fuel (fuel pump, or filter) or does it seem to be flooding (restarts with footfeed floored = carb adjustment).

-John

 

 

 

 

 

**********
5/30/20

There are special rivets that are on the door latch mechanism that I was going to fix the assembly with. Are the rivets available or will the assembly need to be replaced?

I’m best corresponding on my home email instead of my work address, but I have a photo of what I’m talking about attached to this message.

Thank you.
Jim 


From: John Spencer, Red River Chapter Advisor: 
 I don't know of any source for the Door Latch mechanism rivets.  I'm sure you could find rivets that would work from a rivet supplier, but I don't believe the new mechanisms are terribly expensive.  I would replace the whole mechanism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

5/27/20

Steering,  I have excessive free travel when I turn all the way right or left what would cause this?

Richard


From: John Spencer, Red River Chapter Advisor:  This is a curious problem.  The steering box on a C1 is designed to have zero lash (play) at the high point (center position).  As you turn the steering the play between the worm gear and the sector shaft roller increases.  This, however, is not suppose to be excessive.  In a worn steering box it's all but gone; as you tighten the worm gear / sector shaft engagement at the high point  (where the worm gear has its most wear) to eliminate play - you decrease the designed play at the steering's extremes where the worm gear experiences less wear.  Attempting to adjust the play out of the center or high point often yields a binding of the steering at the extremes not excessive play.  I would go through the steering box adjustment procedure and verify the play exists in the steering box.  This procedure can be found in Chevrolet's Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12.  Steering adjustments are found in Section 9, the guide which can be found on-line.

 

 

 

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:

I would do a complete inspection of the front suspension and steering.

Excessive play in steering could be any of a number of problems.

A-frame moving, tie rod ends, idler, spindle bushings, steering box....

Verle

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  You need a copy of ST-12 and a scale that will measure a pull force of 0-3 lb.  First be certain the steering wheel is centered using the indicator mark behind the horn button.  Adjust that with the drag link or tie rods.  Adjust your steering box exactly as described in ST-12.  It worked for me.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

05/20/20

I recently purchased a used front sway bar from a 1961 Corvette. I was with the understanding this should have a diameter of 1” but when I measured it the diameter is .805

 

Would you know the correct diameter ?

 

Thank you

 

Joe A


From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter Vice President:  

 

From old GM parts manual, .8125 for 1960 to 1962.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

5/13/20

Sir’s,

I have a question;  Where might I find some pictures of the underside/back of the dash on my car.  And BTW I just sent my application for membership in today and was unaware of your existence as a club. 

Thanks in advance and I’m sure with your vast knowledge of several members there is a wealth of information about these cars. 

Kermit

 


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Kermit,
The 1956-57 Corvette Assembly Manual has the illustrations you're looking for.
https://www.mamotorworks.com/corvette/Product/corvette-1956-1957-c1-assembly-instruction-manual-623583
Every Corvette owner absolutely needs a copy for their year car.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  If you are planning to have it look as original, 
I have a 1957 that I plan to remove the gauges and replace all the wiring connections as original
My resources are my 1957 AIM electronic file that was put together from several resources.  The
file size is huge so it cannot be sent.  There is one internet site that has them, (http://earlycorvettes.com).
1956-7 Judging Manual, and go to the NCRS Discussion Board.  You can search for photos from 
members who posted there.

Joe

 

 

 

If you are planning to have it look as original-
I have a 1957 that I plan to remove the gauges and replace all the wiring connections as original.  My resources are my 1957 AIM electronic file that was put together from several resources.  The file size is huge so it cannot be sent.  There is one internet site that has them (http://www.earlycorvettes.com).  1956-7 Judging Manual, and go to the NCRS Discussion Board.  You can search for photos from members who posted there.
Joe

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Kermit:  Unfortunately, most 1957 Corvettes have gone through a period when they were, essentially, worthless and the people who acquired them had little regard to originality and made a lot of modifications to them.  Your best source for the information you are seeking is to examine an original unrestored car.  In NCRS, these are called "Bowtie" cars.  Maybe you can find one of these in the area that you live in through NCRS,  If you live in the Los Angeles area, I can help you with this.  Otherwise, attend NCRS and SACC events and see if you can find what you are looking for.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 



**********
5/13/20

Hello,
 If this question has been asked before I apologize.  What grease do you reccomend when assembling and maintaining the C! front supension.

Thanks For your Tech page,
Steve

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  

I use the "standard" heavy chassis grease used on all car in the 50s, 60s, 70s, ....I just looked at a couple of tubes and did not see a specific designation. Being paranoid I regularly grease the front end, all 22 zerks.

On long road tours I usually have the car greased about every 750 or so miles. That is probably more than necessary but I don't have trouble with the front suspension wearing out.

I replaced the ball bearings in the front hubs with tapered bearings, they last better.

The obvious ones to keep lubricated are the king pins and the A-frame.

 

 

 


From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Steve,
You should be able to locate a digital copy of 1953-1962 Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12 online.
Page 0-7 contains Illustration Fig 10 which shows all chassis lubrication requirements.
The answer to your question is a GM approved Chassis Lube and all 21 fittings should be lubricated every 1000 miles.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Steve:  My response goes beyond your question, but you should find it useful.  I have many years experience servicing General Motors front suspensions, and have seen it all.

First, you should have a copy of Corvette Servicing Guide, Publication ST-12.  This publication was prepared by Chevrolet in 1962 and is the only official shop manual for C-1 Corvettes, and is available from all the major Corvette parts supply sources.  This publication is a "must have" for all C-1 Corvette owners.

Except for ride height, your front suspension is identical to that used on the 1949-1954 Chevrolet sedans.  All the bushings are "metal-to-metal" with a very limited ability to store grease.  Therefore, Chevrolet recommends that the front suspension lubrication points (22 of them) be greased every 1000 miles using chassis grease.  The 1000 mile interval is extremely short by today's standards and, in my experience, you can go 2000 miles without causing undue wear.  Chassis grease is available in cartridges that fit in a standard chassis grease gun.  I recommend that you outfit your grease gun with a rubber hose that is sold separately.  This greatly assists in accessing the hard to reach grease fittings.

When greasing the fittings, wipe off the tips of each one to prevent the injection of abrasive dirt before greasing with the gun.  I keep my front suspensions clean by taking a putty knife to scrape off all the old grease and road dirt.  I have a 5 gallon metal can filled with about two gallons of Mineral Spirits and use an old sock to do the cleaning.  Your suspension may have so much old caked grease and dirt that you cannot find the grease fittings.  The upper A-arms each have two inner grease fittings that are hard to see, but must be greased.  The king pins each have two fittings, two facing forward on one side and two facing rearward on the other.  Consult ST-12 to see where all the fittings are.  The front center pivot (steering idler)  ball bearing is permanently lubricated on Corvette. 

The wheel bearings should be packed every 10,000 miles with Sta-Lube Heavy Duty Drum Brake Bearing Grease (in the green can),  This is the only satisfactory grease to use for ball bearing wheel bearings.  Dip each bearing in solvent and use a heavy paint brush to work out all the old grease.  Carefully inspect the balls for evidence of spalling (failure).  Each ball must be shiny and smooth.   Inspect the inner and outer bearing races for evidence of flaking.  The surfaces must be completely smooth.  Pack the grease into each ball bearing assembly by hand, making sure that there no voids.  After installing the bearings, tighten the castle nut to 30 ft-lbs and spin the hub to make sure the bearings are seated.  Then back the nut off until the cotter key clears the first hole in the spindle and insert it and bend the ends to keep the key in place.  If your grease cap has a static collector in it, cut off the outside tail of the cotter key to prevent it from engaging the spiral on the collector and destroying it.

Ball bearing wheel bearings must be pre-loaded.  Tapered roller wheel bearings must never be pre-loaded.  The castle nut must be slightly loose with tapered roller wheel bearings.

Larry Pearson

**********

5/12/20

 

Recently purchased a 1961 corvette but the spears were in the trunk. And it seems last time painted the holes were filled and painted over. I have got all parts for reinstall but wondering if there is a pattern to putting them back on the car. Don’t want to willy nilly a $60k car


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Randy & Doc,
First, let's define our terminology.
1958- 1961 Corvettes have 3 Side Spears on each side cove.
Corvette Central sells them as individual parts or as complete kit 331215.

1958 Corvettes have a pair of Trunk Strips that Randy doesn't need. 

Assuming whoever filled in the side cove mounting slots merely filled them with body filler & a putty knife, the original mounting slots/holes should be obvious by inspecting the coves on the inside of the panels. The splash shields on the inner fenders and the kick panels in the cabin will have to be removed to gain access. Use a small drill from the inside to open the holes then use a small round or flat file regain the original size.

Please, go buy a 1961 Assembly Manual & read it before you start cutting.
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

5/12/20
Were bell housings and transmissions painted or just left unpainted in 1956?

Thank you, Michael


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Michael:  The cast iron transmissions were installed on the engine after the engine was painted red with the bellhousing attached.  Then the cast iron transmissions, 3 sp, 4 sp (late 1957), and Powerglide, were painted with gloss black chassis paint with the engine/transmission in the chassis.  There was black overspray on the bellhousing.  This was the way my unrestored 1960 was done.  This final blackout painting was done with the engine and transmission mounted in the chassis just prior to the body drop.  The brake drums brake lines, one side of the brake master cylinder and brake line to it, the front suspension,  the rear leaf springs, and the exhaust system were all painted with chassis black paint.  It wasn't pretty.  It was done as a rust preventative.  The paint quickly burned off the exhaust manifolds and the exhaust system.

There is an assembly line photo in the book "Birthplace of  Legends"  by Peter Licastro that shows this.  I can't find my copy so I can't tell you what page it is on.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 


**********

05/11/20


Were bell housings and transmissions painted or just left unpainted in 1956?

Thank you, Michael


From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Hi Michael:


1956 Corvette engine color is red except possibly the last few weeks of production, which may be Chevy Orange;  Manual transmissions use a cast-iron bellhousing and is painted engine color.  There were several items that were bolted to completed engine and they were painted as an assembly including the water pump, oil pan, balancer, and bell housing.  Items that were not bolted onto the assembly were many times black, such as the road draft tube and generator adjusting brace.

The red color is similar to Ford Tractor Red.

Joe

 

**********

05/10/2020

Can the powerglide transmission on a 1954 Corvette be removed without removing the engine?
 
Thanks,
 
Dave

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

Yes, you can remove the Powerglide transmission on the '54 without removing the engine.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

05/10/2020

I need to put in my lock assembly for trunk on 1960 corvette. I am having a rough time trying to attach the retainer clip which holds the lock cylinder in place. Should I remove the corvette emblem to get better access to the lock assembly? Thank you for your assistance. Jim


From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter President:  

Yes remove the emblem. You are fortunate to have that opening for the emblem to give you access

to install the retainer clip. That's the reason they designed that emblem that way. I have a 1957 and
don't have that extra room to work. It's REALLY hard to get that retainer on a 56-57.

Bill Preston

 

 

 

 

 

 


**********

Dear Solid Axle Corvette Club:

I hope you can help me,  The problem concerns body segment being fitted properly:  Hood adjustment so front of hood is flush with fender on 1960 corvette

 


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

I assume that the question is:  How do you adjust the hood on a 1960 Corvette to fit the opening and to align the hood with the front of the car and the side fenders?

Refer to figure 6 on page 11-2 in Corvette Servicing Guide, Publication ST-12.  This publication, prepared by Chevrolet in 1962, is the only official shop manual for C-1 Corvettes, and is available as a reprint from all major Corvette parts supply sources.  This publication is a "must have" for all C-1 Corvette owners.

The hood hinges have slotted mounting holes where they attach to the hood (two bolts) and the radiator support (three bolts).  The three bolts attaching the hood hinges to the radiator support allow for up and down adjustment of the hood and the two bolts attaching the hinges to the hood provide fore and aft adjustment.  

The rear lock assemblies mounted on the rear of the hood also allow up and down adjustment of the hood at the cowl.  There is a screwdriver slot of the tip of the hood  lock assembly for this adjustment.  Also, the rubber bumper on the catch assembly mounted on the firewall is adjustable up and down.

If your Corvette has had front end collision work improperly done, it may not be possible to achieve a perfect fit of the hood to the  body.

Larry Pearson

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Jim,
As designed, the hood height is pretty much locked in once the hood hinges are bolted to the underside of the hood and radiator support bracket.
There are actually two separate adjustments:
1) There are 4 (2 on each side) inner fender to radiator support bracket screws/fender washers that lock the entire
   front clip height in place on both sides relative to the hood.
2) There are steel & rubberized fabric shim packs/screws that help raise/lower the support bracket relative the chassis
   & helps lock in the hood height.

Note: This is IMPORTANT !! All front bumper bolts and support bracket to chassis shims/screws must be LOOSE before attempting to raise the front clip to match the hood height. Loosening the inner fender to main body/cockpit screws at the rearward edge on both sides might help ease some strain also.

Good luck & be careful,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

I have been told the V-8's could have come from the factory with either 10 inch or eleven inch flywheels and clutches.  Is that correct?  I am trying to get the correct size for my 1956.  I have had a 3789733 casting flywheel for some time and had planned on using it.  I looked in a 1973 GM parts book and under flywheel it says, second design, 10 inch clutch, but when you look up clutches, it says 10.5 inch clutch.  I look in catalogs and some have 10 inch 10 1/8 inch and some have 10.4 inch.  Hemmings  Motor news seems to say either 10, 10.5 and 11 inch.  After all of what I have read I am thoroughly confused.  What would be the size that was used from the factory and what is the recommended size to use?


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

My 1964 chevrolet master parts book lists  flywheel casting number 3729004 for all 55 thru 62 corvettes as well many other 55 thru 64 passenger cars and trucks. The actual clutch diameter is referred to as 10 or 10.5 inches. There is an 11 inch listed for 55 thru 64 passenger and trucks....cast 3714463 for hd applications, but not for corvettes.. I can not find your flywheel 3789733 listed anywhere.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River chapter VP:  

3789733 is an 11" flywheel for late 60s and 70s. Used mostly on big blocks.
Not for Solid Axle Corvettes.

Verle

 

 

 

 

 

 


**********

Hello, I am finishing up with rebuilding my front suspension which I stopped work on seven years ago. Back when I installed the new king pins, I think that it was the owner of the machine shop that replaced my upper inner bushings in the spring towers, that suggested putting locktite on the outside of the lower king pins bushings to keep them from turning. The more I learn and the more i think about it, I think that this was probably the wrong thing to do. Can anyone tell me whether I did the right thing or wrong thing in putting locktite on those bushings? I know they call them free floating bushings. My second question is how can you tell when an upper control arm is no longer serviceable? My new bushings, when inserted into the outer side without turning in the threads and without the outer shaft in place, will go into the hole leaving a thread or two showing on the outside. They seem to tighten to the prescribed 35 foot pounds when it is assembled with the cross shaft in place. It is just that I have had it apart a few times and possibly by other owners as well. If this one side is in need of being replaced, I would rather do it at this point. I do have another control arm that I could replace it with, but it is pitted and doesn't look so nice as my one that came on the car. Thank you for all of the help.

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  Ref:  1953-1962 Corvette Servicing Guide
         Technical Service Department
         Chevrolet Motor Division

    Installation

"When replacing the kingpin floating bushings it is not necessary to ream them to size as service bushings are machined to finish dimensions.
However, when replacing floating bushings, care should be taken to make sure the oil grooves in the bushings line up with the lubrication fitting hole in the steering knuckle.
These bushings should be free both on the kingpin and in the steering knuckle."

This would suggest that locktite is not appropriate for the bushings.

I am curious why the shop suggested locktite.

 
Verle

**********

hi, What color is the metal axle positraction tag? Thanks. Steve


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Steve:  I have a 8x10 glossy print from Petersen Publishing Motor Trend road test taken of the rear axle of a 1961 Fuel Injected Corvette with the car on a lift.  The series of 31 prints I purchased from Petersen in the late 70's shows all aspects of this car:  front, rear, interior, trunk, engine compartment, interior and the entire chassis of the car.  This car has 1519 miles on it, so it had been driven, and the chassis was not like new anymore.  You can even clearly see the grain on the steering wheel.  These were high quality pictures taken with a large format camera.

The Positraction metal circular tag and the plug were unpainted.  It is possible that these items were removed for inspection of the contents and the chassis blackout paint was removed at that time, because it seems plausible that these items would be painted chassis black.  Also, there is a large yellow (It was yellow on all three of my cars) circle of paint circling the fill plug area and a large white "X" grease marked under the yellow paint.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Steve,
It is my belief the circular tag was raw steel....possibly painted over during the blackout process. I always cad plate mine. NCRS has never deducted anything for the plating.
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi guys , i have a 1957 corvette and i am looking for the correct headlights . it is" a t-3"  triangle in the middle with pebble grain, on the bottom it shows " guide" on the bottom and above that it shows " sealed beam" in small letters. in 1956 it had large words " sealed beam".  can you folks help me locate 2 headlights.  

thank you 

bob  

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Robert:  Corvette Central sells "correct" reproductions of the 1956-57 headlight bulbs.  Of course, these are not "exact" reproductions.  The originals had a small bright silver half moon shaped shield inside in front of the filaments.  The reproductions have a larger fully round black cone shaped shield with a slot across the center.  I assume that NCRS accepts the reproductions.

Larry Pearson  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Hi Bob

Per the JM
Headlamp bulbs must be matching Guide T-3 design; with pebble-grain (not vertical ribs) within
triangle. SEALED BEAM 3/8" and 1/4" high lettering were both used throughout the 1956 and 1957
year models.
 


The other challenge is they are non-DOT.  I would like to get another set myself.

Joe

 


**********


Having a tough time locating replacement hinge pins for a 1955 Corvette. Any help appreciated.


From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  Ebay vender for early Corvette parts  partsqueen responded to my message:

"New message from: partsqueen Top Rated Seller(9,765Green Star)
Hi There, I have the door hinge shims and plates and a few door hinge pins and maybe a few bushings and not many"

Her parts store is on ebay.


If you deal with her make sure to clarify what you are getting and what condition.

She often has very hard to find parts.

If the pins don't show on her store, click on a part and send message about the pins.

Verle

 

*Note:  From: Web Editor:  When you venture on ebay you are never sure who you are dealing with.  They may not have a lot of expertise, plus their idea of quality might not be the same as your idea of quality.  They may send you something that differs from what you asked for.  As Verle said above, make sure you verify the part and condition.

 

I just found another source for early parts.

http://www.carolsclassiccorvettes.com/

Lloyd Miller, a noted restorer of 53-55 Corvettes said he has had good luck with them.

I have not asked them about hinge pins. 

Another issue, 55 hinges are aluminum. You have to be careful to not break them.

Verle

(Note:  From Web Editor:  The same disclaimer noted above applies.)

**********


Larry here from the Solid Axle Club.  I have a '61 FI and the welch plug on the side of the meter is seeping fuel.  Wondering who may have experience and be able to seal or replace the plug?


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Larry:  They all leak because the zinc casting cold flows causing the plug to loosen up and leak.  This is not a problem with the early sand cast aluminum fuel meters that use a pressed-in aluminum plug.  Don't try to replace it.  The factory pressed it in with a special fixture that no one I know has.  If it just seeps, I recommend living with it.  If the plug is so loose that it might pop out, you must epoxy it in place. If appearance doesn't matter, seal it with JB Weld.  JB Weld is not affected by gasoline when it is cured.  JB Weld sags until it cures.  Use wax paper to hold it in place while it cures.  Or remove the fuel meter (or the entire unit) and lay it on its side while the JB Weld cures.

If appearance does matter, you will have to remove the fuel meter top cover and try to compress the existing welch plug using large Channel Lock pliers or a "C" clamp and a steel bar or thick washer on the inside of the casting for support.  I have not tried this.  Do not use a hammer.  Be very careful not to break or warp the casting.

Do not use Cyanoacrylate (crazy glue) or RTV Silicone sealer.  These adhesives are not compatible with gasoline.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

**********


Due to illness, my 1959 sadly sat for too long.  Upon starting it, the
brake pedal went straight to the floor.  The master cylinder is dry (and
a little rusty).  There is no sign of a leak anywhere underneath or
around the lines or cylinder.  Any ideas what may have happened.   I run
Dot5 with stainless lines, but the brakes are original drums.  Hope
everyone is well and likely finding more time to work on your cars! 
Thanks for helping.

Best,
CLM


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Clark,

If there was brake fluid in the 59 when you parked it then it had to go somewhere. You state there are no visible leaks at the master, wheel cylinders or brake line fittings then there is only one other place it could be leaking. Check the under the dash at the rear of the master where the push rod enters the master. If the seals on the piston fail, fluid can leak out into the passenger compartment. If this is the case your firewall insulation pad will be soaked with silicone fluid . I run dot 5 in all my vintage cars.....one for over 30 years and several over 20 with no issues. I don't use SS brake lines because it can be difficult to get the fittings to seal. Last resort............fill up the master with dot 5 and pump the pedal until the leak presents itself. 

Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

Hello SACC Tech Help,

Sorry to bother you, but I had a question on rear axle bearings on a 1962 model.  I'm rebuilding the rear differential and installing new axle bearings while I have easy access.

The question is...when I install the axle bearings, should the shielded part of the bearing face outward or inward towards the ring gear.  the way it came out was with the bearing shield facing outward (it was leaking grease & oil).  I believe this direction is the way it left the factory, but having said that I've heard other people say to put the shield facing towards the ring gear.  The reasons cited are;
  1.  That the gear oil will help lube the bearing as it penetrates the bearing shield.
  2.   That the rubber seal with spring facing outward helps keep brake dust, water, and dirt from the bearing.
  3.   The the bearing shield facing outward will not stop the grease from leaking out and getting on the brake shoes.
So I can see good arguments for installing the bearing facing either direction and wanted to ask what the current thinking was from the folks at SACC.

Any and all opinions and insights are appreciated.

Thank you much!

Arvid


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Arvid,
Page 4-8 of the Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12 clearly shows that the rear bearing shield is installed to the outboard side to allow axle lube access to lubricate the rear bearings.

Get yourself a complete digital copy of Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12 on-line.
It will answer many of your questions at a glance.

Bill Huffman, pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,  
>
> I'm hoping that you might be able to help me out or possibly direct in in the right direction for some help.  I am just finishing up with a from suspension rebuild on my 1956 which has a 1957 frame.  This is a car that I have never driven incidentally.  When I got everything back together it was quite obvious that there is something wrong with the right hand side.  That side has extreme negative camber which cannot be adjusted out even with the eccentric pushed all the way out.  The hub lays back at the top about three inches. The top of the brake hub is missing the upper control arm by about a quarter of an inch.  I thought that the steering knuckle might be bent, but on examination I think that it has been replaced with with the wrong part.  It doesn't have a stop on the back side either.  It could have never had one or it could have been broken off.
>
> So here is my problem, I have another steering knuckle from a 1949 Chevrolet and and one from a 1953 Chevrolet.  I have heard that they are the same as Corvette, but I have also heard that the spindle on them comes off at 1 1/2 inches lower.  Therefore they may not be the same as Corvette.  Do you happen to know what the casting number would be for those spindles.  If i knew what the casting numbers were for Corvette, I could try to match it up with one from a passenger car.
>
> Thank you for your time and help.
>
> Best regards,
> Michael

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Cahpter Advisor:  

Mike,

The steering knuckle ( I refer to it as the spindle ) is the same for both 53-62 Corvettes and 49-54 Chevrolet passenger cars. Casting number 3693446 for both left and right sides. I believe your problem is with the steering knuckle SUPPORT which is what the steering knuckle attaches to with the kingpin. I too have heard there are differences in the support but I don't know the exact differences. 

 

 

 

49-52 passenger steering knuckle support casting number...........................Rt.........3687652
                                                                                                                        Lf..........3687651

53-54 ..............................................................................................................Rt.........3703786
                                                                                                                         Lf..........3703785

53-62 Corvette................................................................................................Rt............3733450
                                                                                                                        Lf.............3733449

I have heard that the 53-54 passenger and 53-62 Corvette supports are dimensionally the same. The difference is the material they are made of but I can't confirm that. 3733450 knuckles can easily be purchased. In fact, I have a couple.

Chip Werstein     

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Here is the other part of the puzzle

The 49-52 pass car and 53-62 Vette spindle supports are the same.  The 53-54 pass car spindle supports have the knuckle for the king pin about 1 in. higher.  If the 53-54 pass car spindle supports are used on a Corvette, they will lowers the car.  See the photo.

Joe

 

 

 

 

**********

Thanks a bunch. I'm trying to trace ownership. (1962 Vette).   I believe there was only 3 owners including myself but am having difficulty. I was told the warranty was probably best way
Paul

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Paul,

I have never heard anything about warranty records and Chevrolet claims they don't have build sheets going back that far.The DMV offices in some states may keep vehicle ownership records from day one. I live in California which is not a state that keeps old records. I've owned my 62 since 1973 , a black plate California car, and I've never been able to trace ownership back prior to 1973. However, NCRS has shipping records on most Corvettes from mid 1962 going forward. This info can be purchased from NCRS and will provide you with the build date, ship date and the dealer it was shipped to. The last I heard they had info on 62's beginning with aprox VIN 6000. Perhaps the delivering dealer is still in business and may be able to provide some info. It's a long shot but..........

Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

I own a 1962 Corvette which I did a frame off restoration in 1977-80. The car has been driven 8500 miles since them. During some service this winter, I noticed play in the left front king pin. There is i n/out movement of the bottom of the tire. The wheel bearings have no runout. I dismantled the left side, cleaned everything and nothing looks worn. Measuring everything with micrometers, I see no difference in pin or bushing diameters compared to a new set. There IS a .002" difference between the bushing outside diameter and the inside diameter of the spindle bores. These are the free floating bushings. This seems excessive and could be the source of the movement. My question is, Are there any specifications for the good/discard diameters of the knuckle and spindle where the king pin bushings go? I did not notice this during the rebuild and can only guess what may have caused these bores to be large if in fact they are. I really don't want to take the right side apart to compare sizes, hence the reach-out to you.

Sizes Measured: 
Bushing ID - .868/.869" Bushing OD - 1.054" (lower bushing checks 1.053/1.054")
King Pin Diameter .866"
Spindle Bushing ID - Upper bore. - 1.056/1.057" Lower bore 1.056"
My mics are three place, and I plan to repeat the checks with a 4 place mic, but I doubt tenths of thousands are the problem.

Thank you for your time

Gary

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Gary,
Before you tear your car's front suspension apart, king pins are most likely only a small contributor to the looseness, especially if only the left side exhibits this.

Worn tie rod ends, a worn or poorly adjusted steering box worm & shaft gear,
a worn pitman arm ball stud, worn or poorly adjusted drag link bearing ends,
a worn/loose third arm bearing or even a cracked/broken third arm bracket (from lifting the front end with a jack) all have an impact on LF wheel in/out looseness.
I found all but the cracked third arm bracket after I added tapered bearings to my 1960.

Good luck with your search,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  Bushing Diameter:    1.05"
Bushing Length:    1.315"
Bearing Thickness:    .59"
Pin Diameter:    .866"
Material Type:    Steel

Apply a light coat of grease to the new bushings and insert into the spindle, aligning the grease channel
on the O.D. of the bushing with the grease zerk hole in the spindle.


IMPORTANT! Installing bushings incorrectly will cause premature wear of kingpin and bushings.

Verle

**********

have the frame on my 56' cleaned/primed    now, what color is closest to the original frame color    bearing in mind i will buy paint at ace   thks  gene  

From: Brad Bean, SACC President:  

Understand your desire to get the painting done while we are still under a "stay at home" order due to COVID-19, and Ace has some good products for around the house, including "Rust-oleum" paints for metal.  However, the frame is the base for everything else that follows, so I'd allow the time and expense to do it right, including purchasing the proper paint.  Not just color (which is a satin black), but quality, as well.

There are a number of sources for the proper automotive paint, including your local automotive paint supply stores.  If your local stores are closed, my mail order supply house of choice, for restoration automotive paints is "Eastwood" of Pottstown, PA.  You can call and speak with a specialist about your specific needs, ie: color, type and quantity.  They also offer spray cans, if you don't have a paint gun and compressor.  Call: I-800-345-1178 or order on-line www.eastwood.com

Good luck!

 

**********

Looking to find correct positioning of trunk and deck lid weatherstrip on a 1958 Corvette. Been looking for hours but nothing concrete is showing. Thank You Dale

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River chapter VP:  First, adjust the trunk lid to a good fit with the body.

The trunk weather strip was installed to trunk lid inner lip with the seam (ends) located at the bottom center, near the latch mechanism. 56-57 Technical Information Manual.

From personal experience on my 57, if you actually want it to seal you may have to custom fit. That is, verify the weather strip is actually in "good contact" all the way around.
I had to add material to "make the weather strip thicker" on a lower corner. The material I added was a piece of weather strip with the thick edge trimmed off. You would get judging deductions for that. I wanted a good seal because we drive the car.

I suggest you buy the NCRS technical manual for your car. It has lots of details like this.

Verle

 

 

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

 

 

 

 

 

Here is additional information for the trunk weatherstripping.

It is not tubular in shape.
From the 1956-7 JM:
Trunk lid weatherstripping is of the same type as door seal. It was installed to trunk panel inner lip with the seam located at the bottom center, adjacent to latch mechanism. Yellow adhesive was brush applied and may have been excessive. Weatherstripping should not show
signs of paint overspray.
If you have the typically weatherstripping, it is somewhat like an L.  The 'thin' leg is glued to the trunk vertical surface.  The fatter leg lies against the trunk horizontal surface.  

Joe

 

 

**********

how many body bolt downs (body to frame) are there

-Sharon


From: Chip Westein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

The answer is 12. 13
  if you count the spare tire hold down bolt.

Chip Werstein

 

 


 


From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  According to the GM Manual: 1953-1962 Corvette Servicing Guide page 1-47:  
   
    The underbody attaches to the frame body mounting brackets at ten locations (fig.103).
    The ten body bolts and washers are installed from the top side of the underbody.

Verle

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have purchased a 1962 radiator .it has a date code of 62L stamped on top as usual.but this date goes beyond when they stopped making 62 cars.the code L is for november. i wonder if harrison made more than GM ordered or just made extras as the 63s were different.maybe gm had ordered more as they knew some would get damaged in collisions etc. i am wodering if anybody has run into this late date code and what it means.i submitted a ? earlier about what posi fluid to use in my covette and really apreciate the response.
 
steve


From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  Aluminum radiator #31150916 was used in late 61, and all 62 with external supply tank 3151016.

The radiator was probably produced for some time after 62 assembly was ended for the parts supply system.
The later dates are considered replacement parts. There would be a minor deduction in judging if everything else was correct (part number, configuration, etc).

A lot of OEM/NOS parts fall into this category. Everything is correct except the date code.

Verle

 

 

 

 

**********

I have been spending time getting our 1961 Corvette roadworthy again.  I ended up taking the tach and speedometer out of the car and having a rebuild of them from D&M Restoration in Greenville, SC.  Very happy with their work.

 

The issue I have now is that the tach is not reading correctly and is reading high through all revs.  My question is about the pulley on the generator.  I have a 3 5/8” diameter pulley on the generator.  I am thinking that the 4” pulley would bring the RPM’s down and make the reading more accurate.

 

Am I on the right track here?

 

Rob

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP:  The mechanical tachs are similar to the speedometer, they can be calibrated internally.
You might talk to D&M about it.

When I had my tach rebuilt I talked to them about calibration and they verified it.

How do you know the tach is not reading correctly? Have you compared it to another (electric) tach?
I would try to verify the tach reading before doing anything.

Changing the pulley size would adversely effect the generator output.

Verle

 

 

**********

I have a 1960 corvette that I am repainting. As part of this effort I need to repaint the underside of the hood. I will be using a satin black paint; is this the correct hue? Also are the male hood plates (on the hood) satin black or are they some type of plating? I have searched the web and found pictures of both painted satin black and what appears to be silver painted. Thanks in advance.

Thanks for your time.

Regards,
Book


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter:

Book,
Two members of Michigan Chapter actually worked as engineers on the C-1 production line in St Louis.
I asked them this same question several years ago.
The answers are: the inside of the hood was painted in semi-gloss black, on the production line from inside the engine compartment before the chassis/ body joining. The cowl side edge  & two outer edges were masked with a fabricated drop on & off cardboard mask to keep the outer edges body color.
Both sets of zinc dichromate plated hood latches (male & female) were installed in the car before painting the engine compartment. Original condition would appear to have black overspray on the latch edges only & not under the latches.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Book,

I will once again strongly suggest that anyone wishing to restore a Corvette correctly purchase an NCRS judging manual specific to their year car.

1. Under side of hood paint.  Semi flat black, matching engine compartment blackout.

2. Hood hinges, latches and locks.  These items were cad plated and installed prior to body painting and engine compartment blackout painting. They may and probably will appear with blackout paint over spray in varying degrees.

Chip Werstein

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC President:

I agree with Bill's statement that painting the underside of your hood "satin" black, as well as painting the "male" hood latches the same color is correct. The latches were affixed to the underside of the hood prior to painting.  

On a personal note... during the first restoration of my '60 Corvette, I removed my hood latches and noticed the area under the latches was unpainted fiberglass, supporting the fact the underside was painted with latches in place.  

Over years, paint adheared to the fiberglass, but started pealing from the bare steel latches.  This gave rise to the incorrect theory the latches had been unpainted.  This and personal preference is why you see some latches in natural steel.  However, if restoring as original, this is incorrect.

Good luck with your restoration!


From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Here is additional information from the 1956-7 JM.  I do not have a later C1 JM.

Underside of hood panel is semi-flat black, matching engine compartment black-out.

All metal items in rear latched & hood lock are cadmium plated, except for the coil springs, which are painted gloss black. However, these hardware items were installed prior to exterior body paint and engine
compartment blackout painting, and therefore may appear with paint overspray, in varying degrees, much of which may not have completely adhered to these lubricated parts.

 

**********


Again thanks for your help.

I did the following tests.   Battery is good/Strong/new    Tank is full.

With the key on I have 12.5 volts.

the key on and the 2 lines to the sending unit.  the gauge reads full or full plus.

I removed the sending unit and only get about a .02 change in the resistance from 0.00 to 0.02.

The unit is new (less than a year) but I am I correct to think the sending unit is bad?

When everything is hooked up, the gauge moves from below empty to empty.

Thanks for you help.

Todd

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP and Advisor:  Todd,

Since you have the sending unit out take a close look at the coils. Most covers are attached by tabs that bend over to hold it in place. Straighten the tabs carefully, remove the cover and inspect the surface where the moving contact rubs on the coils. Look for corrosion and/or broken wires. I have had mixed success with repairing those things. If there is corrosion you can try sanding with fine emery cloth or sand paper. Don't rub too hard you can displace wires.

Verle

 

 

 

 

**********

I just received my dads 1960 corvette that has been parked for 15 years.  I’ve got it running and the fuel gauge doesn’t work.    He says it worked when he parked it.   And we replaced the fuel tank and pick up unit this winter.   Mow the gauge doesn’t work.     

I plan in taking the pick up unit out and testing it with a volt meter to ensure it is working.    

Any Advise on what to test or look for on the gauge side?

The other question I have is I would like to put larger wheels or tires on it.   Does anyone know the max size that will fit and look appropriate.

This will be a driver, as it doesn’t have matching numbers.

Thanks for your help.  Todd

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP and Advisor:  Todd,

Since you have the sending unit out take a close look at the coils. Most covers are attached by tabs that bend over to hold it in place. Straighten the tabs carefully, remove the cover and inspect the surface where the moving contact rubs on the coils. Look for corrosion and/or broken wires. I have had mixed success with repairing those things. If there is corrosion you can try sanding with fine emery cloth or sand paper. Don't rub too hard you can displace wires.

Verle

 

 

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP and  Advisor:  Does the gauge not move at all? Is there fuel in the tank?

The gauge is hot all the time. It should have 12 V. Check that first.

The "sending unit" is just a variable ground.
Check for 12 V to the sending unit. If the key is on and the battery is good there should be 12 V. If not 12 V, check the wire for damage. Make sure the connection on the Gauge is clean.
Ground the wire where it connects to the sending unit. The gauge should show empty.
The tank must have a good ground to the frame or some other place that is grounded to the battery.




Are you talking about larger diameter wheels or just wider wheels.

I have 15X7 with 215 70 15s. They look good and work good, don't rub. 57 Corvette.

I have no experience with wheels larger than 15"

Verle

**********

My question is about what fluid I should use in the rear end of my 1961 Corvette. It is a posi rear. Right now I have an open rear end, but originally my car was equipped with a posi rear end as it has the vent. I purchased an original correct posi unit for my car. Which I will be installing this spring. I know I can't use silicone fluid in the rear end. Would I use 80/90 lube? What posi additive should I use?

Thanks for the help!

If you have any questions email me and I while respond.

Thanks,
Steve

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

Steve

I have used in my early Corvette rear ends Stay Lube 80W90 limited slip gear oil part# SL 2473 ( one gallon with pump) and one bottle ( 4 oz.) of AC Delco limited slip additive # 88900330......$9.00 from Summit. Put the additive in first and then fill up with oil. 

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********


my 1961 (driver) is an early vin with a copper/brass radiator. (Not the radiator that has the funny offset tank) The fan shroud lacks a good 1 1\2 inches of sealing off the top tank.  Is there a special shroud for a 61 that does not have the aluminum radiator?


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

I would suggest you refer to the NCRS 61-62 judging manual for complete information.

Very early 61 base motor cars used left over 60 copper radiators. supposedly there were 192 left over.

after that all engines used left over top tank aluminum radiators.

After  61 aprox vin 1700 all remaining 61 and 62's used the later aluminum x flow style.

All 61 and 62 fan shrouds are the same

However there were 3 different core supports used in 61 so you may have a radiator/core support mismatch.

I will also add that in 50 years of playing around with C-1 Corvettes, I have never seen a 61 with an original copper radiator.

Chip Werstein

From: Verle Randolph, Red River Chapter VP and Advisor:

 
The  shroud should be a three piece top. The center shows to be 4 inches depth.
Logo is P in a keystone. Stamp on the vertical.
No measurement on the gap or set back on the fan.  All shrouds are the same but supports are different.

Verle

 

 

 

 

 

**********


Found a 59 Vette n trying to verify vin to engine....is there anyone or a document to do that? Also original specs ? Color etc.


From: Brad Bean, SACC President:  

Sorry, but on C1 Corvettes, there is no direct link between the VIN and the engine number, and there are no longer production records indicating which engine was installed in a particular vehicle (all records were destroyed in a fire).  However, to see if the engine is "possibly" the original block, you can estimate the vehicle's date of production by using the VIN and Corvette monthly unit production numbers; then compare that with the production date of the engine block (located on the engine's stamp pad) to determine if they are compatible.  There are various opinions on this but general guidelines indicate the engine block should have been produced two to six weeks prior to the vehicle's production date.  If the these align, it indicates the numbers are "matching", but not necessarily "original".

As mentioned all C1 production records were lost in a fire, and C1s did not have trim tags or build sheets, so unless the previous owners kept the original bill of sale or early items (like color photos and copies of vehicle registrations, etc...), color and options are difficult to substantiate.

There are some physical traits on the vehicle that could indicate if it came with certain options, but you either need to know what you are looking for or know someone who does and is willing to help.  A local NCRS C1 judge or restoration shop, specializing in early Corvettes, might be your best bet.  

The stamp pad on a 1959 283 CI block is located on the front right (passenger) side of the block, just beneath where the valve cover meets the manifold.  It protrudes out from the block and the numbers can easily be seen with a flashlight with the hood open.


The engine number should be stamped into this "flange" (not raised numbers/letters).  It should be six characters long. Starting with the letter "F".  All letters are capital.

Starting with 1960 production the last six numbers of the VIN will precede the engine number.  So you can tie in the serial number with the engine, but not for '59.

 


There are two ways to determine original color, but neither are an option if you don't own the vehicle.  In most cases, the color name was written on the back side of the passenger compartment (inside of the trunk) with a greece pencil.  If you remove the cardboard front trunk liner, you can sometimes see the outline of this thru the paint.  If the car has been restored and repainted, this is probably gone.  The other way is to scratch off paint from one of  several areas, where it would be difficult for a shop to have removed all of the original paint before repainting (such as the inside corners of the gas filler compartment).  But I doubt the current owner would consent to this and even if they did it is not 100% conclusive, as if the restorer had the body dipped, all traces of the original paint are probably gone.

I'm guessing you are looking to purchase this '59 and would like to verify some things before you buy it and time is short.  If so, my advice would be to enlist the services of a local professional.  If you have the time and are in this for the long run, suggest you locate a copy of Noland Adams' book: "The Complete Corvette Restoration & Technical Guide - Vol.1 1953 Through 1962".  These have been out of print for decades, are scarce and pricey (if you can find one), but a good investment and will help you understand the physical "tell - tell signs" of what to look for, what information is out there and where you can find it.

Good luck!

**********

Howdy, this is Darrell 1959 C1

I am looking for some guidance to the right direction to get the interior done my 59. It has been a complete body off restoration and I am not sure where to start with ordering interior kits, supplies and such. I will need foam for seats, carpet, and anything else needed for a 59.

 

Can anyone give me a direction or where is the best place to get interion supplies?

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC president:  

Appreciating the need not to give endorsecements, one can't answer this question without sharing the benefit of our experiences, including brands.  Also, there are as many answers to this question as there are members on the panel.  Frankly, it depends on what Darrell wants to do with his C1 and what he wants to spend, with the most accurate and correct reproductions generally being the most costly.

That being said, Al Knoch is generally recognized as one of the best for accuracy and quality (& most expensive).  However, decent quality interiors are available from Paragon, Corvette Central and Corvette America.  One more note... if he wants the original looks but the comfort and feel of leather, Corvette America also makes a leather alternative interior.

Of course, the end product will only be as good as the quality of the installation, so choose your upholstery installer wisely.  Also, if you are going to pay the price of a new interior, I recommend going the extra distance and purchase new springs and padding, as well.

 

Leather was not offered on C1s, including 1959.  I mentioned leather only as an alternative, as I wanted the look of the original interior, but was more interested in comfort versus having the car judged at NCRS.  And... living in Florida, didn't like sticking to the vinyl seats in short pants during the summer's heat.

Again your end purpose should govern the type and quality of interior you choose.  If restoring to NCRS & Bloomington Gold standards, then you want the most correct and best quality interior; Al Knock would be a good choice.  However, if you want a correct looking "driver", the others will work without the additional expense.

 

**********

Electrical issues:  I have a 62 Vette which I have done my best to keep as original as possible inside and out.  I was wanting to change out the radio system to a more updated unit with XM services.  Thus, I had the ignition switch on during a period for hookup but when I attempted to start the car it wouldn’t start. After checking under the hood for a short period I touched the coil in checking the coil wire and it was hotter than fire.  I noticed after close inspection it had cracked. (I take it the points were closed). Changed it out, removed distributor cap and points and they also were fried. Changed points and condenser and properly set points with feeler gages.  Turned ignition and car started right up.  Checked gauges battery was on full charge all working.  Went to turn off engine  after battery changed up and engine continues to run like I had not turned ignition off but left it on. I had to pull coil wire to turn off engine. Went to troubleshooting.  Disconnected the hot wire to the radio. Thought it may be my ignition switch. Changed it out started engine, turn switch to off engine still running.  Changed my voltage regulator and ballast resister no luck. Engine continues to run on off.  I am lost. Any HELP!!!

Thanks


From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

 

Hi Darrell

You may have an ignition switch issue.  When the switch is off, there should be no voltage to either the start wire or the run wire that goes from the switch to either side of the ballast resistor.  When the switch is at start, voltage goes to the ballast resistor and directly to the coil.  When the switch is ON, voltage goes to the ballast resistor, through the resistor and to the coil.

Also start the car while checking the voltage at the coil.  
1. Turn to ON.  Voltage should be less than 12V (8-11V?)
2. Turn to start. It should be 12-14V during starting. 
3. Start the engine, and release the key.  The voltage should drop to less than 12V (8-11V?) while running, since the electricity should flow through the resistor.  If the voltage does not decrease, it is pointing to an issue with the switch.

Check these.  You may have shorted the switch.

Joe

 

**********

I am having some steering tightness in the 61 Corvette. I Put new grease sockets and greased, but still hard to turn. Have you had any of this before? Maybe needs steering fluid!

Roger


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Roger,

This problem is nearly impossible to diagnose with your 3 sentence explanation, but I'll attempt to give some possibilities as to the root of your problem.......in no particular order.

1. There are 20 grease fittings in the front suspension. Did you grease all of them?

2. Do you run big tires or stock 6.70x15? Wider tires will make the car steer harder.

3. Do you have the stock 17" steering wheel or a smaller one? The big wheel gives the driver more leverage.

4. Has the front end ever been rebuilt? If not, after nearly 60 years it is probably worn out.

5. Have you checked the steering box for lubricant? Manual calls for 90 weight gear oil, but it will leak out quickly. I use 680 weight gear oil and I still have small leaks. Many people use grease but I don't like it. 

6. Steering box could be out of adjustment.

7. Steering box may be worn out especially if it has been running dry for a while.

Sorry I can't be more specific.

Chip Werstein

 

**********

I have two questions,
 
                I have 1961 Corvette that oil canister that holds the filter is leaking around the bolt that holds the filter to engine.
Rear end drain plug is also dripping oil after I installed new seal.
 
Thanks, Glenn.

Glenn,


 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Glenn,

I am not aware of any company that offers a rebuild kit for the oil canister. Try to tighten the bolt as much as you can.....that might stop the leak. Other options are replace the canister with another either used or repo. Or you could convert it to a spin on style filter.

Rear end drain plug leak.  I always put a good thread sealer on the drain plug. You will need to drain the rear end, thoroughly clean the plug and housing threads, re install the plug with thread sealer and refill the rear end.. I use a product called Right Stuff.

Chip Werstein

 

**********

Does anyone know what the function of the micro switch near the chock cam is for. The only way I can keep my car running after starting it is to insert a piece of cardboard between the switch and the cam. If I do not insert the cardboard the car barely runs and appears to run very rich.
Thank You,
Craig


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Craig:  The early FI units (prior to 1958) had an electric solenoid attached to an arm that, when activated by the car's starter circuit, caused full enrichment from the spill valve to assist in starting the car.  The solenoid is only activated while the starter is cranking.  When the starter is released by the ignition key the solenoid is disabled and the FI unit operates in the normal mode without starting enrichment.  The purpose of the micro switch is to disable the solenoid during engine cranking if the engine is flooded by flooring the gas pedal as you would with a carburetor.  This is process is called "unloading".  Evidently your unit is mis-wired so that the starting solenoid is always activated when the car is running or starting, causing a very rich situation when the car is running.  That is why you are having to activate the micro switch with a piece of cardboard to disable the solenoid.  You need to correct your wiring error by connecting the FI unit starting solenoid to the starter solenoid circuit and not the car's 12 volt battery.

Starting in 1958, a device called the Cranking Signal Valve (CSV) was introduced and the expensive solenoid and micro switch were eliminated.  Initially,the CSV was mounted directly to the Plenum and it caused full manifold vacuum to be applied directly to the main diaphragm on the fuel meter to cause the needed enrichment during starting.  In later units the CSV was moved to the Enrichment Diaphragm Cover causing manifold vacuum to be applied to the enrichment diaphragm assembly and that caused fuel enrichment during starting.  When the engine starts, manifold vacuum increases and the CSV senses this and shuts off the flow of manifold vacuum to the main diaphragm or the enrichment diaphragm.  To achieve "unloading" when the engine is flooded, flooring the gas pedal causes the air meter throttle valve to fully open, reducing the manifold vacuum to the CSV and reduces starting enrichment.  When the CRV fails to shut off the manifold vacuum when the engine starts, the engine runs in a very rich mode like you are experiencing.  When this happens, the CRV is defective and has to be replaced.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

**********


I’m looking for a template or dimensions to position the flags and “fuel Injection" insignia (coves and trunk lid) on my 1957 Corvette.  Do you know where I can find that information?  The mounting holes were eliminated when the car body was restored.  Thanks!
>
> Bill


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Bill,
Before you start drilling new holes, clean the back side of the cove panels down to the clean fiberglass. If it was really a fuelie, the holes filled with bondo are most likely still there.

Re-drill from the back side using as small a drill bit as possible then clean out the original hole with a slightly larger drill bit or small round file from outside the car.

Don't punch it out with a hole punch from the inside because that will blow out a large hole in your paint.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

**********

I just found your website and have an issue with my 62 Corvette. I
purchased the car in 1975 and have significantly restored it. I have
not, however, done anything to the transmission. It had a Hurst shifter
installed when I bought it. Lately it tends to 'lock-up' on the 2-3
shift and get 'stuck' in 2nd. Crawling  under the car and wiggling the 2
levers from the transmission will usually free it, but I can never tell
which wiggle does the trick. Is this a tranny problem or a Hurst
problem? Any suggestions?

Thanks so much.

--
Fair Winds,
Mark

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Mark,

I will assume your car has a 4 speed. I believe in always trying the "simple fixes" first. Before tearing into the transmission, I would re adjust the shifter. It's quite simple, but it's a tight working space in the trans tunnel. Hurst shifters are almost indestructible. It is possible the your 2nd or 3rd gear levers have somehow become miss adjusted or the 3rd gear stop has become loose and moved. Google Hurst Competition 4 speed adjustment for directions. Hope this solves your problem.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********
Solid Axle Corvette Club:

Trying to find correct or original screws to mount speedo to dash set of two. For a 1956 Corvette.
Thank you

Richard

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

The assembly manual (section 12 sheet 11) shows the speedometer is mounted to the dash with two PN 187572 screws that bolt to nut plates that are riveted to the dash.  A have a note that says they are recessed hex head machine screws.

Joe

 

 

 

**********

Dear Solid Axle Club,

I have a 1957 Corvette with an original Rochester Fuel injection. I bought car In 1995 after a frame off restoration started in 1991.

The fuel injection was restored in that time frame. It basically has been running great since. Last week I noticed a strong gas smell

and noticed a lot of gas pooled on intake manifold. I cleaned up and haven't started since. Does this sound like a unit leak?

I'm taking it to my local rod mechanic Monday just to make sure it's not coming from somewhere else.

Can you recommend someone located near me who can repair or rebuild unit if necessary. I'm located in Temecula Valley.

I'm not a member but know several of your members especially Walden Dahl who has done lots of work on this car. I'm waiting

a return call from him. Also if you know any tech sites that might explain problem.

Thank You

Ron

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Ron:  If the fuel leak is under the fuel meter, the likely problem is the spill valve cover under the fuel meter.  It uses a rubber "O" ring to seal it, and these have a tendency to crack and leak when they get old.  If this is the problem, do not drive the car!!!  There is high pressure fuel under the cover, and this leak is the leading cause of FI equipped Corvettes burning to the ground.  You have to pull the unit to get at the cover screws, and you will need a new O ring.  It is easy to install.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Ron,

My guess is that the gasket between the high pressure pump and the fuel meter has failed or the high pressure shaft pump seal has failed. They are fairly simple fixes but the FI unit will need to be removed. Regardless do not drive the car. It is a fire looking to start. There are two people in your area who are fuel injection experts. Chuck Smith in Valley Center and Doug Prince ( 818-425-0679) in Murreitta. Walden is also a good choice but somewhat inconvenient for you.

Chip Werstein

 

 

**********


I have a 56 corvette and the speedo bezel needs to be restored/replaced. My question is are the groves on the front of the fuel suppose to be painted black or left chrome?

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Below the speedometer, the recesses are painted black.
From the Judging Manual, "Circular grooves in bezel have black paint strips."

Joe

 

 

 

**********

Hi Guys, you been a great help in the past and I’m hoping you can give me assistance with my sun visors?

 I purchased a new set of sun visors from Corvette America.  The sun visors have a seam around the entire perimeter where the vinyl meets.  There are no predetermined holes for the mounting rods which must go into the sun visor.  When I called Corvette America for technical help they had no answer and suggested I ask a form.  Can you please help me in how to best create the hole in the sun visor to insert the rod?

 Thanks again for your help,

 RS


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Roger,

The assumption by the aftermarket manufacturer & vendors is that you have existing sun visors that you use as a model for fitting your new hardware kit into your new sun visors. They fit exactly the same way.


I would use a blind hole locator punch from my screwdriver set to locate the holes in the visor inner structure & penetrate the vinyl.

I'm certain that Paragon https://www.paragoncorvette.com/ would be more than happy to fit new hardware to your visors if you or a local shop are unable to handle it.


Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

Hello,

 I have 61 Corvette, my question is that my rear license plate does not work. I have power to the socket and the bulb is good.
I have notice that there is no ground to the light. Do I need a ground ? If so how do I wire it. I have looked for diagram on the internet no luck.
 Regards,

                Glenn

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Glenn,

The license plate light is grounded using the same wiring harness as the rear stop lights.

Check out page 66 of Paragon's C-1 catalog for a picture. https://www.paragoncorvette.com


Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

there is no wire coming out of the harness, I need to run ground wire from the light to ?

I have power at the socket

(From Bill Huffman)        All Corvette electrical equipment (lights, gauges,tank sending unit, radio, battery, WS wiper, etc.) are grounded to the frame / chassis.
Somehow the ground lead has broken or been cut. So open the rear light harness cable covering (tape), find the ground wire (use a meter to verify continuity to the chassis), splice in an extension wire and connect the ground to the lamp housing. Consult your local Advance Auto Parts or Auto Zone for help.

Or buy a new rear light wiring harness (Corvette Central P/N 661325).

Or buy a new rear light wiring harness  (Paragon P/N 5319).

BTW- Get yourself a 1961 Corvette assembly manual CC or Paragon or Mid-America.

It answers most, if not all, your questions about your '61.

Good luck,

Bill Huffman                      

 

 

**********

Hello Everyone
I purchased a 61 fulie 35 years ago . Its been running , is there a way to track the serial #
Thanks 
Jim

From: Brad Bean, SACC President:  

This is stating the obvious, but it may be your only opportunity, because there are no factory records at Chevrolet or GM on C1 Corvettes as hard copies were destroyed by fire, years ago. 

If you kept a copy of the title from your original purchase, this would give the name and address of the previous owner, and that's a good start. If so, you can write them to see if they have information on how long they owned the car and if they retained any records on the car's previous owner(s).  But, be prepared for a dead end as I've owned my C1 for 26 years, and when I wrote the former owner listed on the title from my purchase, I found they had long since moved with no forwarding address.

Another possibility, if you've stayed in the same state since your purchase and it has a history in the same state, there is a small chance your state department of motor vehicles may be willing and able to help track it.  However, most state records only go back so far and hard copies were destroyed when they converted to microfilm and these were discarded when they converted to digital.

A long shot... SACC members have the ability to place a free ad  our quarterly magazine, "On Solid Ground".  Place an inquiry ad asking if anyone has information relating to your VIN number, along with your contact information, and see if anyone responds.

These are my only ideas.  If another of our members has any suggestions, I welcome their comments.  Good luck!

**********

Good morning:
Would we have a diagram of wiring generator/regulator and distributor with tach drive gen on 1961 corvette?

Harold

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Harold:  Most of the answers you need and much more are found in Chevrolet's official shop manual for the C1 Corvettes:  Corvette Servicing Guide, Publication ST-12.  The Chassis Wiring for 1961-62 models is found on page 12-14.  The actual servicing of the distributor is found in Section 6Y, Engine Electrical.  ST-12 does not cover the servicing of the generator and voltage regulator and the operation of the car's charging system.  For that you have to refer to the 1961 Chevrolet Passenger Car Shop Manual, Publication S&M-32, Section 9, Electrical Systems.

Corvette Central sells the ST-12 Corvette Servicing Guide reprint, but not the car shop manual.  Actually, any Chevrolet car shop manual for the 1955-1962 models should give you the information you need to service the charging system.  If you will be in Los Angeles on Saturday, November 9th, I will be teaching the operation and servicing of the C1 Corvette electrical system at our SOCALSACC Fall Tech Session.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

Greetings!
I’ve recently installed a power rack and pinion steering system in my ’62 Corvette. I removed the serial number tag from the original column after taking a picture of it in position. I contacted our county’s Ohio State Highway Patrol office, and the Sgt there is willing to work with me on properly documenting the repositioning of the s/n tag to the driver’s door post.

I’m curious if you have any photos of 1959 and earlier C1s with the tag location on the door post, so I can duplicate the position as closely as possible. The local Sgt actually suggested positioning the tag on the door post, as opposed to the cowl near the steering column, saying he has seen many early Corvettes with them there. He was not aware of the ’62 tag being located on the column.

Once I have a photo of a door post-mounted tag, I need to take the car to the local Post, where they will write me a letter explaining why the tag is not in its original position.  Ant help will be appreciated.

Regards,
Dave

From: Joe LeMay, Socal Chapter Advisor:  This is an NCRS article that relates to California, but should be a good guide for use in any state.

VIN Verification

Joe LeMay (55193)

 

 


(Although the process applies to any car, it was specifically for my 1957)

There are some words and phrases that we in NCRS really like.  They are things like: typical, appears to be factory applied materials, casting date within 6 months of production date, Top Flight, Duntov.

There are other words and phrases that we in NCRS do not like.  Not typical, wrong, incorrect, “not lacquer,” and the worst one- counterfeit.  Counterfeit can really get you in trouble.

You so proudly show up with your car for a judging meet for flight judging, sportsman, or just to be there.  Someone looked at your VIN tag with an opinion “this is not the VIN tag that was issued and installed at the factory.  St. Louis did not use that one.”  You are informed that your VIN tag is not the typical factory VIN tag.  It is a counterfeit. 

The part of the Judging Reference Manual that applies to the VIN tag reads:

“The car must have the correct attached Chevrolet factory Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) plate or an attached valid state-approved replacement ID plate that matches title and/or registration.  ….. Any car appearing without identification as described shall be ineligible for any NCRS judging.”

 

So what needs to happen now?  It is really simple.  There are two options. 
1. Just show your car with a bad VIN tag to the California Highway Patrol.  They will look at it.  Then they take your car away and you never get it back.  That is it.  Never to be seen again.  Only the pictures remain.  Judged again?  You just want to drive it again!
2. Keep the car.  Send a letter to the NCRS.  Tell them they will never see your car again.  You are through.

No those are the wrong approaches.  You have a VIN tag that looks like this (photo).  Looks good, right?  It is the tag that came with the car, right?  You bought it that way.  You have a CA title.  The registration is current and you legitimately drive the car on the street.

The process with this counterfeit mess is much simpler and you will not lose your car.  The resolution is clearly stated in the JRM.  You need to get your VIN verified with a state-approved replacement ID plate.  The process can sound scary.  The reality is something different.  Here is what you do in California.

During the assembly process in the St. Louis plant, the VIN number was stamped on the frame.  On a C1, the VIN number is stamped twice on the frame.  The frame stamps are on the top side of the frame right below the driver seat, about half way along the door.  Then during body drop, the corresponding VIN tag was attached to the body. 

 

Although there is a VIN tag attached to the body, the true VIN number for the car is associated with the number stamped on the frame.  During restoration or collision repair, if the body or frame is changed, the VIN tag that matches the frame stamp is to be used.

If the body is replaced, the VIN tag that matches the frame must be installed on the replacement body.  Nothing changes.  If however the frame is replaced, the VIN tag that matches that frame must be used.  Your VIN has changed.  You need a clean title for that replacement frame to be installed.  Your car will now have a new VIN, new title, and new registration.

You will not be able to see the VIN on the frame with the body firmly bolted to the frame.  How do you see the frame stamp and get a photo of the frame stamp?  You may need this information if you want to be certain this old car that changed hands so often is what your paperwork says it is.

Here is the process to see the frame stamp and get a photo of it.  Unloosen all the nuts for the body bolts a few turns.  There are two at the radiator support, four on each side under the body (8 total), and the two in the rear in the fender wells.  Now, remove the four nuts under the body on the left side.  Place a 2x4 wooden block on the body floor just outboard the frame.  This is where the outer seat bolts are located.  Ensure the block is long enough to support the weight of the body without cracking the floor.  Jack up the body an inch, creating space between the body and the frame.  The body will move.  Just do not go too far.

Now find the VIN frame stamp.  It should be about in the midpoint of the door.  You may need to clean the top of the frame to remove dirt, etc.  Use a mirror placed and held against the body.  Reflect a light onto the frame.  You should see both VIN stamps.  They are only a couple of inches apart.

Take a few photos of both VINs stamped on the frame.  I taped a mirror to the body to hold it in place.  It could take some experimenting with the angle and intensity of the light and the camera to be used.  The camera needs to be able to focus very close to the object.  I had more success with an iPhone 5S than a digital camera.  I may not have had a macro setting on the camera?

So now what do you need to do?  Gather all the information you may have on the car.  It could be the current title, and any past titles that you have as a record.  You have your registration, license and insurance card.  You have a photo of your VIN tag, and the photos of the VIN frame stamps. 

Make copies of all this information.  You will be submitting the copies.  I did not have any of this information returned to me, so do not provide original documents.  Call your local CHP to make an appointment to have your VIN verified.  They do this all the time and it is not some crazy request.  You will most likely meet others at the CHP office doing the same thing.  When I was there, a guy had inherited his mother’s car from Georgia, it had been repaired and the VIN tag was missing.

Go to the CHP office for your scheduled appointment.  They will take all your paperwork, and take your car behind a fenced area to complete the process.  They will drill two holes for the rivets to attach their replacement ID plate to your door frame.  Their ID plate number will match the VIN tag and the current title.  They will also provide you with a copy of an Application for Vehicle Assigned Identification Number Plate.  That is their record of the replacement ID plate.

I requested they not mount their replacement ID plate to the space where the original VIN tag was located.  They added theirs below the original area.  I did not want to lose the original look of the VIN tag.  A potential new owner may want to see that tag.  The entire process took an hour and was very easy to do.  Here is the final product.

One more thing; If you are going to have your car judged (which is why I went through this exercise), remove your ‘counterfeit’ VIN tag before it is presented for judging.  NCRS does not want to see that non-original on the judging field, but the replacement ID plate meets all of their requirements.

 

**********

Hello 

I have a 1960 corvette I am rebuilding. Have a few issues I have ran into.

The temp gauge reads about 20-30 degree to high can these be recalibrated?
The engine when 1st started when cold has 70 lbs pressure the oil gauge only goes to 60 will it damage the gauge going to 70 when warm drops down to correct temp?
Is there someone that rebuilds the original horns?
Thanks
Jeff

 

From: Joe LeMay:  

Hi Jeff

The temp gauge can vary depending on the ambient temp and the condition of the cooling system.  Those variations also consider whether the gauge itself is reading correctly.  What is very important with these systems is whether the electrical connection between the gauge and the threads is continuous.  If you use Teflon tape or some other material to seal the sender with the intake manifold, that can create added resistance, and an inaccurate gauge.  You can check the sender by immersing it in a pot off very hot water at a known temperature.  Keep in mind, these engine temperatures can rise in hot summer months.

Oil pressure as high as you are seeing is very easy to create.  Just get an oil pump with a high pressure spring.  The stock oil pressure for these C1 engines is 45 psi.  You can restore that pressure by selecting and installing the correct oil pressure relief spring.  That will require access to the oil pump.  Is that part of your rebuild?  The gauge itself is very simple and usually trouble free. 

All C1s used a 45 psi oil pressure spring and had a 60 psi gauge.  A higher volume pump is not beneficial in a small block.  It just allows more oil to be bypassed at the pump.  It also puts more oil into the top of the engine where it can leak out.   The oil pressure spring that comes with any new pump may not be correct, and I suggest making the change at the time of installation to insure you will have the correct and desired pressure, via the spring.  The 45 psi spring is available from GM as P/N 3814903.  Order that spring and insure it is installed in the pump.  It will provide 40-45 psi @ 2000 rpm in a hot motor.  There is also the 49 psi green spring that is available through Melling.

There are a couple of horn rebuilders.  We just lost one of the better rebuilders.  Horns are very simple and disassembling one may show how easy they are to adjust.  Are you looking to try it yourself?

Joe LeMay

 

**********

Need help! Would like to get information on the alignment and how to DIY recover the cloth top on my 58 if anyone has DVDs or step by step  instructions I would appreciate it very much there doesn't seem to be anyone in my area that knows how at a reasonable price so once again I get to do it myself thanks!

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Jerry:  Al Knoch not only sells a convertible top for your 1958 Corvette, but he sells a DVD that instructs you on how to install the top yourself.  He sells his Top Install DVD for the 1956 through 1962 Corvette for $60.  His toll free order line is 1.800.880.8080, or visit his website at http://www.alknochinteriors.com.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 

Jack /  Bill,
 
I put the Vintage Generator on with all the correct bracket for 61 Corvette. So far everything is working fine.
How to make few changes. Mounting plate for the Generator had to slot holes in the plate that got mounted to the
exhaust and the correct fan belt would not work. There is no way to get this belt on. Other than that everything is align.
Have about two fingers from heater hose to belt. So Far so good. Again thanks for your help. I have join the Solid Axle Club,
but they did not cash my check yet.
Two last question. What color paint is on 61 Corvette firewall and inner fenders ? Do you know any good transmission shops in New Jersy,
My T-10 Trans is leaking oil  around the shaft that holds the cluster gear in.
 
Regards,
Glenn

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Glen,

Generator. I am guessing that you have the wrong generator mounting plate and/or wrong u bracket. There are different parts for different applications. The belt issue could be incorrect size gen pulley or belt too short.


Trans leak.  If I am understanding you correctly, the trans leak is where the cluster shaft enters the front of the trans case. Your leak would be between the front of the trans and the bell housing. Before sending it to a trans shop, I would try the following simple fix.

1. loosen the 4 bolts that fasten the trans to the bell housing about 3/8 ". Do not remove them. With a large screwdriver, pry the trans back until it contacts the bolt heads.This can be done without removing the drive shaft or shifter.

2. clean the area between the trans and bell housing. I use the edge of a rag soaked in lacquer thinner. If you don't mind making a bit of a mess brake clean will work too.

3. take a linen business card (not a shiny card) or gasket material and cover both sides in gasket sealer.I use a product called The Right Stuff available at any auto parts store.

4. insert the card between the trans and bell housing so that it completely covers the cluster shaft area. Re tighten the 4 trans bolts. Let it cure for a day. This little trick should solve your leak. If it doesn't you have a very worn cluster shaft or hole or the leak is elsewhere. Good luck.

Chip Werstein
 

 

**********

I have a 1960 FI and it has windshield washer system. I am in need of a wiring schematic ( rubber hoses)  for the 60Vet. 


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:      

Ron,   

Page 73 of Paragon Reproductions C-1 catalogue shows the fuel injection windshield washer set-up. However, it appears to be a smaller copy of a drawing contained in the GM 1960 Corvette Assembly Manual which is really what you need to get. It's available from any of your favorite Corvette parts vendors.

Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1960 with a reproduction steering wheel. I need a high quality Red replacement or a place that can repair the original which has cracked at the spokes.

 Can you help?

 Tom

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tom:

If it is top flight or Duntov material, Richard Dunham is your guy. He is an NCRS Judge & SACC Member from Michigan who restores original steering wheels. It's not cheap...he offered to upgrade my '60 wheel last year for $1000.
 

If your car is similar to mine, a really nice driver I've owned for 51 years and don't plan on selling , Corvette Central or Paragon and a half dozen others sell quality reproduction wheel kits for less than $500.
 

 Regards,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Hello,

 I have a question about my 1960 roadster.  When the convertible roof is folded and the rear deck closed, the fit is terrible.  The rear deck sits about an inch above the rest of the car!  I’ve attempted to adjust the roof with no luck.  If you can provide any help with respect to getting a better fit I’d very much appreciate it.

 My apologies for the email signature…a guy has to work!!

 Rog


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Roger:  I have never heard of the type of problem you seem to be having. I own a 60 and two 62's, all with soft tops. You seem to be saying that with the soft top assembly folded into the top compartment, when you slam the deck lid and it latches, that the deck lid back surface pops up about one inch above the trunk lid surface.  Does it do this with the soft top up in place?  If not, I suspect that the connection between the soft top cover hinges and the soft top fiberglass cover is broken, and needs to be repaired.  

 
One of the problems with today's service replacement soft top fabric is that it is at least twice as thick as the original fabric.  The result is that the top assembly does not easily fold down into the top compartment cavity.  The ends stick up, and you have to slam the cover to compress the folded top into the compartment.  This puts a lot of stress on the fiberglass soft top cover, and this could have resulted in the fiberglass connection with the cast steel hinges has fractured.  If this is what happened, it will be very difficult to repair the fractured fiberglass well enough so that it will be strong enough to take this kind of force.  You may have to purchase a used top cover.  A used cover should be readily available, but will have to be painted to match the rest of the car.

 
Another  possibility is that the soft top cover hinge assembly has broken loose from the car body.  You will have to remove the cardboard cover in the trunk to see if this happened.  I have never heard of this happening.

 
Larry Pearson

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC President: 

I too have a '60 with a soft top.  Like you, I had a similar folded roof problem, to the point that it cracked my deck lid at the two ends.  

 
Unless the car has been altered, the distance between the bottom of the storage area and the deck lid, when closed, is a constant.

 
Assuming you have made all possible adjustments...  my first question... do you use a "pillow" or folded towel to keep your rear window from being scratched?  If so, make sure it does not impede with the joints when folded. 

 
If not, and it's the correct top for your car, the struts are probably bent.  Another sign that is is the problem is the two support bars, with weather stripping, above the side windows form a slight "V" rather than being straight across. The bends may not be detected by the untrained eye, and if you have not done this before I reccomend sending it to a professional soft top shop to have it straightened.  This process will probably require the replacement of the soft top material, as well.  While it's there, may as well have them refinish the metal and replace the weatherstriping.

 
This has been my experience, but if someone else has a less costly solution, I invite them to please pass it along.

 
Good luck!

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Rog,
 

Since you live in area code 705, we will be at Mackinaw Corvette Crossroads on August 24th. If you can make it, I'd be happy to take a look at it.

The deck lid position relative to the body is controlled by the hinge mechanism and the latch.  If tight & properly adjusted, it should be the same whether the top is up or down.

Either the top is not folding properly (could be long handles on the top header bar latches or 60 year old top frames don't fold the way they're supposed to) or the tank cover is sitting too high to allow the top to fold.

If there is anything under your deck lid other than the folding top frame, take it out. You can only pack extra stuff after the top is fully seated. 

The few C-1 big tank cars (mostly racing cars with heavy duty suspension & brakes) made were hard top only due to insufficient folding top space. Was the folding top added later and not installed correctly ?


 

Buy a 1960 Assembly Instruction Manual. Owning a C-1 can be a study in the history of questionable repairs or modifications by previous owners. The manual tells you what's supposed to be there.
 

Good luck with your project,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Having an intermittent problem with switch to start engine, I have replaced switch still have problem
Ignition lock cylinder?? Is this next? Replace or is there a repair procedure to follow
Input appreciated
Thanks
George

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

George:  If the replacement ignition switch functions mechanically then the lock cylinder cannot be the problem.  You don't give many details, so I will go down the list of things that could be the problem.

1.  When you turn the switch to "START", does the interior light (an option in 1958) go out?  If your car does not have the interior light over the radio, then turn the headlights on instead.  If the light(s) goes out, then your battery is defective or the terminals to the battery are corroded and need to be cleaned.
2.  If #1 passes, then does the starter solenoid click when you turn the switch to START?  If not, then the problem is either the wiring to the starter solenoid or the solenoid itself.
3.  If #1 & 2 passes, then the problem is the large contacts inside the solenoid that connect the battery to the starter, or the starter motor brushes are worn out.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

Driving season is coming soon here in the Northeast.  I’d like to install brighter LED taillights in my ’62.

Any recommendations?


From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter President:  

I recommend changing to an LED assembly, not just changing the bulb. The assemblies are much brighter than the bulbs alone. One source for an acceptable unit is Corvette Central part #492138. A word of caution: If you're changing the front parking lights to LED, as well, you will need an LED flasher or equalizer. If you leave your front parking lights with the original type incandescent bulbs, you won't have to change the flasher. (The LEDs pull so much less current that the existing flasher won't function without a fake load on it)

Bill Preston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Folks !

Love my ’62 but frustrated with the audibles when rough road causes both doors to rattle.  Think I could repair/replace cause but would appreciate knowing beforehand what parts are usually at fault and what is required to effect repairs to make it nice and tight again.  Any words, books, articles, videos would be helpful.

Thank-you,

Gary

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Gary:  The door windows have a chrome plated steel frame that rides in felt or velvet channels to avoid a metal-to-metal contact problem.  The chrome window post on each door has riveted to it a felt-lined channel to prevent a metal-to-metal contact.  The felt wears with use to the point where the window frame can make contact with the metal bead on each side of the channel that can result in an audible rattle.  Corvette Central sells replacement front channels.  At the rear of the door there is a black painted steel "U" shaped channel that originally was lined with black velvet that was glued to the inside of the channel.  With age and use, this velvet liner comes loose and falls inside the door.  With the velvet gone and the window down, the metal-to-metal contact here will cause a very audible rattle.  This is probably the source of your rattle, because this eventually always happens.  Corvette Central sells replacement velvet that you have to glue into the channel using contact cement.  They do not service the channel with new velvet in it.  There are also velvet-lined seals stapled to the two stainless steel moldings on the top of each door.  These can wear out and cause rattles.  Corvette Central sells replacement seals and staples for the correct look.

Refer to the factory C-1 shop manual, Corvette Servicing Guide, Publication ST-12 for instructions on how to perform the repairs.  Corvette Central sells reprints of this manual.  The information is found on pages 1-14 through 1-17.  You do not have to remove the window assembly to preform this work, in my experience.  The rear channel is not pictured, but is held in place with two screws at the back of the door, which are shown.  The channel comes out through the rear access cover.  You have to remove the the arm rest, door panel, and the access cover to do this.  Be careful not to over-tighten screws that thread into fiberglass, or the fiberglass will strip out.  I repair stripped out holes with JB-Weld.  But that is another story.

 

Larry Pearson

**********

1962 fuelie of 340 hp,was my dad's car,6500 rpm tech and finned brake drum. how can I tell if was f.i. or carburetor car.brother in law stored it on dirt floor pole barn last 15years.has 350 and 4 speed, in#20867S102053.any information would be great. thanks p.s. Brother in law wants to buy high tech chassis and motor, power steering, and disc brakes ,I want to keep original frame and finned drum brakes.


From: Brad Bean, SACC President:  

Sounds like you'd  like to be able to show your father's '62 was a "fulie" in order to make a case for higher value as an original restored car vs a "restomod"...   

My personal tastes lean to "original" vs restomod, but that is a matter of taste as economics are not on your side. Recent auction prices indicate a nicely done restomod will bring a higher price as most NCRS top flight car, especially for '6l & '62 models.

FYI... there were 14,531 Corvettes produced for 1962, 1,918 of which were fuel injected (13.2% of production).

However, I digress... back to your question.  As there was no "trim tag" on a '62 Corvette and the original engine is missing, there are a number of things that might indicate it may have been originally equipped with a fuel injected engine.  The first four assume the front end has never been replaced.

1).   The '62 "Fuel Injection" emblem had two studs, so two holes would have been made in the body pannels.  Check inside the fender body pannel, behind the wheel well openings.  Look, or feel, beneath the crossed flag emblems to determine if there is evidence of these holes having been filled. (If feeling, wear gloves as the fiberglass may be rough.)

2).  The fuel injected air cleaner was fastened with two bolts to a bracket which was attached to the fender with rivets.  Carbureted cars would not have this bracket.  So, look at the left (driver side) inner fender lip, about 10 inches forward of the master cylinder for this bracket or evidence of the rivet holes.  For aesthetics, the bracket may have been removed and the holes filled, so feel inside the lip for signs they may have been filled (again, use a glove).

3).  If the radiator has not been replaced... for fuel injected Corvettes in 1962, they used rectangular retainers with rubber seals on each side of the radiator, where it is attached to the front of the support.

4). Windshield washers, for Corvettes, were standard beginning with 1961.  For fuel injected cars, it was mounted on the passenger side, while for caubaureted cars it was mounted on the driver side.  So check the location of the washer unit.  If the washer unit has been removed or relocated, these holes may still be there, all on the inner fender.  Two above the battery for the vacuum tank, three vertical holes (aligned with the back of the valve cover), and between those two locations there would be four holes (drilled in a rectangular pattern).

Also, there would have been a hole in the firewall, behind the hood latch on the passenger side, for the washer hose.  If no hole, there would have been a dimple in the fire wall as a guide for this hole.  If the dimple is there, then a hole was never drilled.  However, if the surface is flat, the hole may have been filled, so check the inside of the firewall for signs of patching.

5). All '62 Corvettes had distributor driven tachs, however a fuel injected car would have a hole in fire wall, on the left side of the wiper motor for the cable, while a caubaureted car's cable would have been through a hole to the right of the wiper motor. 

There are other indicators, but most are based on whether or not the fuel injected engine had solid lifters.  

Regardless, these are just indicators of possible fuel injection.  If they exhist you may have a "fulie" but should have a professional confirm your findings before proceeding with your restoration.  If none of these sign are present, chances it was not a fuel injected car.  

Hope you and your brother in law come to a mutual agreement before things become akward at future holiday gatherings.  Otherwise, Thanksgiving dinner will be uncomfortable for everyone.

Good luck!

 

**********

Hi, I need to replace the spinners on my hubcaps on 57 Fuelie.  I do not need the entire dog dish, just the spinners.  The ones I am replacing are partially painted red.  That is, the left flag, the one with the little fleur de elis,  is painted red and everything else is black.
But all I can find on Ecklers and Corvette Central are all black, with no red whatsoever.  It is important for me to restore this to ORIGINAL because I will be selling it at Mecum in May in Indianapolis.  Do you know if the fuel injected 57 spinners are supposed to be red to set them apart from the carbureted cars?  Or perhaps these spinners were replaced at an earlier time by someone who did not know that they were supposed to be black?
Steve 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Steve,

The printing on 56-62  hubcap spinners was always painted black.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

Will the Wonderbar radio from 1958 and 1959 corvette will fit a 1960 corvette? What is the value of a totally restored radio?

Thanks

Jeff

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Jeff,

The wonderbar radios will fit the same but the knobs were sometimes different from one year to the next.

Both my wonderbar radios (and my clocks) were repaired be Corvette Clocks by Roger in Jackson, TN http://www.corvetteclocks.com/   I would call him regarding current value & repair.

 

 

 

 

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC President:  

Yes, a '58 or '59 radio will fit in a '60 Corvette.  Wonderbar radios were not just for Corvettes, as almost any model GM radio of that era are interchangeable.  The only difference are the tuning and volume knob differ from other models and for pre '58 and post '60 Corvettes.  Replacement knobs are avilable thru almost any Corvette Restoration parts supplier.

As theDr radios were not exclusive to the Corvette, they are readily available and not too pricey.  A decent older restored Wonderbar will bring $500 to $750. However, you can expect to pay $1200 to $1500 for a freshly restored one.

 

 

 

 

**********

Need help please,

I have contacted at least a dozen corvette websites to no avail. I have a 56 Corvette and am struggling with installing the upper Chrome trim on the glove box. I picked up four new retainer clips that get screwed into the fiberglass section but am struggling with installing the new chrome pieces without scratching the paint. Do the chrome pieces slide down and then up on the clips or are they angled on one side and then spread a little bit and pushed onto the clips. Any help or illustrations would be appreciated .

Mike

 

 

From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter President:  The 2 top stainless trim pieces above the glove box door on a 56 must be snapped onto  2 NSS clips on each side that are mounted directly to the fiberglass with sheet metal type screws  (with the friction clip toward the sides), These trim pieces are closed on both ends making it necessary for you to snap them onto both the clips from the inside toward the outside. I use masking tape on the paint that will be exposed once the trim is in place. Don't put the tape under where the trim piece will be because you can't get it out once the trim piece is on.
 Bill Preston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have purchased a 1962
Corvette. It is my first corvette. It has the removable hardtop with a soft top. I am looking for instructions on how to remove and install the hardtop. I will be picking this car up the end of April.

John


From: Brad Bean, SACC President:  

John,

Actually, fairly simple... undo the two upper latches located above the windshield, left and right.  Then flip up the two latches located on the deck lid (one behind each seat).  Make sure all latches are clear of the bars.  Unless you have a hoist to raise the top, it will take two people to lift the top off the car and remove it to the rear.

Good luck and enjoy your car.  When reinstalling the hard top, I've found it's easier to latch the upper catches first, then the rear.

Enjoy your purchase and please consider joining SACC.
 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

John:  Your hard top is secured to the car with two latches that connect the top front header to the windshield frame header and  two special stainless steel hex head bolts that hold the top rear frame to the the rear deck lid and two special stainless steel hex head bolts that hold each side bracket (one on each side) to the car body right next to the door opening.  Use an end wrench to remove these four stainless steel bolts.  Then unlatch the two front latches that secures the top front header to the windshield frame.  Two people are required to safely lift the top off the car (It can be done with one person lifting the top in the middle, but this is very risky if you lose your balance).  It weighs about 75 pounds.  The top should be stored on end with the back window frame against a wall and with the header on the floor on a piece of carpet or blanket.  Do not store the top horizontally on a box with the box pressing against the inside headliner.  This will cause a permanent indentation into the headliner, and this cannot be removed.  To reinstall the top, reverse this process.

The two chrome latches on the deck lid are used to secure the soft top rear bow to the deck lid.  You mention that the car has a soft top, but you did not ask for directions for putting the soft top up.  Here are some simplified instructions to help you out  It is a one-man operation, assuming that your car did not come with the power top option (extremely rare for 1962).  It is pretty straight forward.  Depress the large chrome button just above the glove box door to unlatch the top deck lid.  Make sure that the trunk lid is closed.  Open the top deck lid.  Lift the soft top header out of the storage cavity and latch it to the windshield frame.  The soft top assembly will follow the header out of the top cavity,  Then hold the back of the soft top frame high enough so you can slam the top deck lid.  Then, assuming that the soft top fabric and the metal top frame were properly installed and the fabric is still plyable (not hardened and stiff), push the deck lid bow down and connect the rear bow hanger loops to the hooks on the end of the deck lid latches.  Push the latch handles down to secure to top rear bow to the deck lid.  If the top fabric is stiff,put the car in the sun to soften it up.  All this assumes that the top frame was properly adjusted so the side windows will fit in the weather strippings.  Adjusting the top frame to fit the side windows is beyond the scope of this explanation, but was explained in a prior Sacctech response.

The soft top cavity originally had a black felt cloth glued to the gas tank cover.  Reproductions are available.  If it is missing, place a soft towel on the gas tank cover.  This is to protect the top rear window from being scratched by the rough fiberglass surfaces in the top cavity.  When putting the top down, place a soft towel in the fold of the rear window to protect it from scratches.

Your car originally came with an owners booklet that explained how to use the car features, and it is very detailed.  Reproductions are available if your car doesn't come with one.  Get a copy and study it.  These cars are simple and easy to service, and are very fun to drive.

Larry Pearson


**********

Can a guy remove the engine without removing 4 speed gearbox?  Thanks,  Dave. 4053

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Dave:  You can leave the transmission in place and remove the engine with the bell housing attached or leave the bell housing attached to the transmission.  You won't have to remove the drive shaft or drain the transmission or disconnect the shifter.  You will have to support the front of the transmission somehow because the rear mount is too far back.  You will have to raise the front of the car to get under it and disconnect the transmission.  You will have to have the engine hoist holding the engine up when you disconnect the transmission or have a jack under the engine oil pan to hold up the rear of the engine.  Then when you lower the car to facilitate the engine removal, you will have to lower the front support of the transmission at the same time and remove the rear engine support.  Maybe you can use a second floor jack that can be controlled from the side of the car to support the transmission while lowering the car.  The problem will be when you reinstall the engine.  You will have to get the transmission input shaft lined up with the crankshaft bushing and the throw out bearing and the splines in the clutch disc.  The floor jack under the transmission will be in the way at this point.  I have never done this so I can't speak with experience.  Maybe I am leaving something out and this is easier than I think.  Or there is another way to do it.  But I have explained the problems that have to be solved as I see it.

I still recommend that you remove the transmission attached to the engine as I described.  It is a lot simpler.  Then you can put everything together on the garage floor and reinstall everything as a unit.

Larry Pearson

 

**********

With the aid of fellow SACC member, we diagnosed an electrical issue on my '58 Fuelie, down to a faulty module of a Breakerless SE (Single wire Electronic Ignition).  The module lasted 8 years, covering 25K miles and I am looking to source a replacement. 

Sadly, Lectric Limited has had the kit on back-order since December, with no indication of how long it will take to restock their supply.  Paragon has exhausted their inventory as well and is on a monthly watch list.  http://breakerless.com/ 

Would you know of any other source?

 

Don

From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter President:  Don, you could possibly try other aftermarket suppliers, or it may be that one of our members might have a unit that they now don't need.  If you are a member and have a unit, just drop a line to sacctech@solidaxle.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Can a guy remove the engine without removing 4 speed gearbox?  Thanks,  Dave. 4053

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Dave:  I have done this and it saves a lot of time and trouble.  You can even leave the stock shifter on the transmission, but you must disconnect it from the transmission body and tilt it back to the rear.  It can't be sticking up.   You have to remove the transmission rear mount cross member and lower the transmission tail shaft down to the ground using a scissors jack or something like it.  Use a piece of plywood on the ground under the transmission tail shaft, because, initially, it will be dragging on the ground.   Install the engine hoist so that the engine/transmission tilts down at the rear.  Slowly raise the engine and inch it forward in steps until the assembly clears the radiator support.  You will have to manually lift the transmission over the radiator support, because it hangs down lower than the engine oil pan.  You must plug the transmission output shaft with a spare yoke or drain the transmission so the gear oil does not leak out the rear.  You can re-install the combination by reversing this process.  

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Can you tell me the correct length of the drive shaft for a 1960 corvette? I have an auto transmission and looks like a lot of the transmission shaft still showing.
Thanks 
Jeff

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Jeff:  All 55-62 C1 driveshafts were the same length.  Make sure that the cloth rebound straps are in place to support your rear axle housing when the rear end is jacked up.  Without these straps, the rear axle housing can drop so far down that the driveshaft yoke can disingage from the transmission.  Also, make sure that your driveshaft is using the correct long yoke.  I don't have the dimensions.  The passenger cars had a much longer driveshaft and used a short yoke.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

My 62 vette tach cable broke, I believe this to be the original cable, this is a 340 hp 4 speed with a distributor driven tach I measured it at 41.5 inches, all the replacements are 32 inches?

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

The original 1962 tach cable housing was light gray plastic coated, and this was used for all engines that year.  I don't recall the length, but it needs to be the correct length to fit in the short space available.   If a service replacement cable is used, it may be too long and will cause a kink at the tach. housing that could result in cable breakage.  Normally the cable breaks when the bushings in the tach. head freeze up due to lack of lubrication.  Reach up and try to turn the stub sticking out of the tach. housing with your fingers.  Use the broken off end to assist you.  If the shaft is difficult to turn with your fingers, the bushings in the head need to be lubricated.  You can do this yourself.  To do this, refer to another procedure I prepared for the sacctech website.  If the bushings are worn out (sloppy), you will have to take your tach. to a speedometer repair shop.  Corvette Central offers a rebuilding service.  If you take it to a speedometer repair shop, make sure that they calibrate it to read twice shaft speed.  This is because the distributor operates at half engine speed.

The inside cable is a speedometer cable made to the proper length.  Speedometer cable repair kits should be available at your local automotive parts store.  You cut the service repair cable to the proper  length and then attach the end on using the procedure that is provided.  You should use a light bodied automotive grease to lubricate the cable while installing it in the outer housing.  Do not use oil.

Larry Pearson

 

 

**********

What happens if you don't use the lower clean air tube to the carburetor?  My car seems to run fine without it.

For many years, I’ve had trouble with the choking sticking in the open position.  Just wondering if this could be the cause.  Just had the carb rebuilt.  It’s super clean but the choke still sticks.  I’ve heard that the choke housing sometimes warps for some reason.  Maybe it gets too hot.

Chuck

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Chuck:  The lower clean air tube was not used until 1962.  Prior to that, the lower end of the exhaust manifold choke stove tube was open to the air, which could result in problems in dusty areas.  If you don't use the lower clean air tube and you live in a dusty area, you should open the choke housing from time to time and clean out any dirt buildup that you find.  If you find nothing, then there is nothing to worry about.  Corvette Central sells a reproduction for the lower clean air tube.  There needs to be a fitting in the carburetor air horn for a rubber hose from this tube to connect to.  This fitting in the air horn was not there prior to 1962.  If it is there and you aren't using it, you should cap it off.

In my experience, the Carter WCFB carburetors have a big problem with a sticking choke, and I have not found a reliable fix for it.  The choke housing on them is made of die cast zinc, which can warp  The Carter AFB carburetors I have had experience with give no trouble at all, but the choke housings on them are made of aluminum.  My 1960 230hp engine has the original WCFB carburetor on it and it sticks open.  I have to move it closed by hand to start the car cold.  The problem is that the piston in the choke housing sticks in the bore.  The only way you can properly access the bore to clean it is to knock out the aluminum freeze plug at the end of the bore.  You can remove the plug by making a tool out of a large nail (with the point ground off) by bending it so it fits in the bore, and then tapping it with a hammer to remove the plug.  Then you can properly clean the bore and examine how well the piston fits in the bore.  If the bore is warped, round it out with a file or other tool until the piston fits loosely in it.  The piston and bore must not be lubricated with oil or grease.  The lubricant will collect dirt and make the problem much worse in the long run.  A dry lubricant from a spray can might help if the problem persists. I have not tried this.  When you are done, the aluminum plug can be tapped back in place with a hammer.  Use JB Weld if it won't stay in place.

 

 

**********

I need to replace the trunk lock on my corvette.i am having a problem attaching the retainer clip. Do I need to remove the trunk emblem to get better access to the lock?
-Jim

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Jim,
It is not necessary to remove the emblem to reset the trunk lock...But it certainly makes it easier to see what you're doing.
However, replacement parts can be "similar to" as opposed to being "identical to" the OEM part.
It may be possible for a locksmith to rebuild your original lock rather than replace it.
Make sure the replacement is "identical to" the original lock, dry fit the retainer to both new & old outside the car to check fits. If the trunk lid lock area has been repaired, that may explain why the fit is difficult and may have to be adjusted.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

**********

The folks that rebuilt my Carter carburetor say adamantly that with new oxygenated fuels the fuel pressure should not exceed 3 PSI.  They recommend a holly in line regulator.   Also timing set at 30 degrees at 3000 rpm.  Any thoughts?  Thanks again, Dave.   4053.

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

I have 3 Carter stock carbs on my '54 and I have a fuel pressure regulator set at 1.5 psi. The car runs fine and I crossed county in 2003 with this set-up. If you have another carter carb, I will leave that to the V-8 guys.
Cheers,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 

What do the pros think about silicon vs conventional after 100% brake system change out.  Master cylinder,  wheel cylinders, drums, shoes and actual hydraulic lines.  Dave,  4053

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  

Dave,

Speaking for myself only, every older Corvette brake system I have had to rebuild, wheel & master cylinders were full of rusty sludge and steel lines were rusty/rusted through. All have been replaced with new or rebuilt cylinders or callipers, SS brake lines and silicone based fluid.

Having owned the same cars for many years (one since 1968), other than pads or shoes, I have had no brake issues since switching to the silicone based fluid.

The only down-side is that dot 3 fluid is more readily available. I keep two bottles in the garage.

Regards,

Bill Huffman, Pres,

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor:  

Dave:  I have been using dot 5 Silicone brake fluid in all my cars since I first became aware of it in 1975 and I think it is wonderful.  I have had no problems with it in these cars I own:  1949 Plymouth, 1951 Oldsmobile, 1955 Cadillac, 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air, 1960 Corvette, 1962 Corvette (2), 1968 Caprice, 1972 Chevrolet C 20 Pickup, 1975 Chevrolet Monza, 1984 Oldsmobile, 1992 Camaro.  All US military vehicles use Silicone brake fluid, because they don't want brake failure.  Dot 5 is compatible with all rubber components that use dot 3. 

There are some issues with it, however.  First, it is hard to find and is very expensive.  However, since it lasts forever, it is very inexpensive in the long run.  Second, it is extremely difficult to remove from surfaces you plan to paint.  Since it is not a petroleum based product, petroleum-based solvents will not remove it.  I, quite frankly, don't know what solvent will remove it from surfaces to be painted. California's EPA has banned all known solvents that remove silicone.  You have to sand or grind it off, and even this might not work.  If you spill it on concrete, it turns white when the concrete gets wet, and this never seems to go away.  When the concrete is dry, it is not visible.

Silicone brake fluid absorbs air in the form of micro-bubbles when it is agitated in the presence of air. These micro-bubbles will congeal into large bubbles and will dissipate when the fluid is allowed to sit undisturbed for at least one day.  If you shake the container the fluid becomes milky with millions of micro-bubbles.  For this reason, you cannot pressure bleed a brake system with Silicone brake fluid, and it probably cannot be used with abs brake systems because the brake fluid gets violently pulsed when abs is activated.  Silicone brake fluid cannot be used in hydraulic power window and top systems that use brake fluid.  This is because the pump agitates the brake fluid in the presence of air, causing millions of air bubbles to form in the reservoir, causing the reservoir to overflow with bubble filled silicone fluid.  I had this happen with a 1948 Buick hydraulic power top system which I tried to convert to silicone.  If you have to use dot 3, use dot 4 instead.  They are supposed to be compatible and dot 4 is supposed to resist absorbing water.

If you have your silicone equipped vehicle serviced in a shop, they always will add dot 3 brake fluid to top off your reservoir, no matter what you tell the mechanic or any signage you use. Most mechanics do not know what dot 5 fluid is, and they definitely do not stock it. The dot 3 fluid goes to the bottom of the reservoir and does not mix with the dot 5, so you might not be aware that this was done.  Most dot 3 fluids can co-exist with silicone fluid, but some versions of dot 3 will turn to "jello" when mixed with silicone.  All dot 3 does not have the same chemistry.  If you have a garage service your silicone equipped car, take a plastic tie wrap and secure the reservoir top so the mechanic cannot get into it.

Because of the agitation problem with dot 5, bleeding a newly overhauled brake system must be done very slowly.  Plan on spending two days doing it.  Remember, though, that if you do it right, the result is, literally, forever.  Start out by carefully and slowly pouring dot 5 into the master cylinder reservoir to fill it.  Let it sit overnight.  This will allow the dot 5 to slowly fill the master cylinder bore.  You need a helper to finish the bleeding.  Make sure all bleeder screws and brake line fittings are tight.  Use a clear plastic hose on all bleeder screws and feed it into a small glass bottle.  The clear plastic hose will allow you to see when the brake fluid starts coming out and is clear of bubbles .  Have your helper go to the right rear brake bleeder screw and open it.  Very slowly push the brake pedal down to the floor and hold it there.  Have the helper close his bleeder screw.  Then slowly lift the brake pedal all the way up.  Do not pump the pedal the usual three times and then have the helper open the bleeder screw.  This will cause the dot 5 fluid to be "blasted" through the air-filled lines, and will cause the fluid to be "aireated" with millions of micro air bubbles, and you will never get a hard pedal.  Repeat this process until you see clear, bubble-free, dot 5 coming out of the wheel cylinder or caliper.  Then take a hard rubber hammer and rap the cylinder or caliper several times to dislodge any bubbles stuck inside.  Then do the routine again until there are no bubbles. Make sure that the master cylinder reservoir remains full throughout the bleeding process.  Pour the dot 5 fluid into the reservoir very slowly to avoid aireation.  Move to the left rear, the right front, and last the left front wheels and repeat this procedure.  When you are done with the left front wheel, you should have a hard pedal.  Push the brake pedal down hard and hold it there and see if it slowly moves down to the floor.  If so, you have a leak somewhere, and you have to fix it.  Dot 3 and 5 fluids are liquids and do not compress.  If when you are done the pedal is somewhat soft, you have air in the system.  Let the car sit for 24 hours, and then repeat the above process until you get a hard pedal.

You can do the above procedure by yourself, but it is tedious.  Cut a piece of 2x4 to length and wedge it between the brake pedal on the floor and the front seat cushion.  With this you can work both ends by yourself.  Be sure to push the pedal down and then raise it up slowly.

When I converted my brand new 1992 Camaro to dot 5, I did not disassemble and clean out the brake system.  I flushed it out with dot 5 at each wheel until no more dot 3 came out each bleed screw.  I took a turkey baster and emptied the master cylinder before starting the bleeding process.  Although there probably was some dot 3 still in the system, it now has been 26 years and I have never had any sort of brake failure.  The calipers and the master cylinder are all original.

If you are rebuilding your master and wheel cylinders or calipers, if the rubber cups are not cracked or worn, I re-use them.  Rebuilding kits are hard to get.  Today's repair kits are made in China and I do not trust anything they make.  In my experience, some of their rubber parts are bad right out of the box.  Never use anything but alcohol as a solvent to clean brake parts.  Petroleum based solvents and lubricants will destroy brake system rubber parts.  Use brake fluid as an assembly lubricant.  If you use a brake hone to clean up the brake system bores, do not attempt to polish the bores with fine sandpaper.  They may leak if you do this.  The finish should be left coarse.  This advice came from a man who has a business rebuilding and re-sleeveing  calipers, wheel cylinders and master cylinders.

Larry Pearson

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  

 I agree with Bill and Larry, I am a big fan of dot 5 and use it in all my vintage cars. However when bleeding a C-1 system I always start at the left rear wheel because it is furthest from the master cylinder......then rt rear, rt front and finally left front. Bleeding is challenging and time consuming especially the pumping the pedal method. Years ago I had a friend who would loan me his power bleeder loaded with dot 5 which had the right top for the C-1 master. Thats the easy and fast way to do it. He's long gone and I started gravity bleeding. I have a lift and I get the car 6' in the air. I use a long clear plastic tube and drain it into a clear bottle. I usually go around the car 4-5 times until all the bubbles completely disappear, always making sure the master is full. Normally it takes me 2 days to get a good pedal.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

1961 Corvette Deck Lid Chrome Clip Installation
 

Is there a cut sheet, instructions, anything, showing how to install the chrome clips and chrome molding that go on the deck lid? Do the clips get installed to the deck first and the chrome slides over the clips or do the clips go on the chrome and then attach to the deck lid?

 Any help would be appreciated.

 Thanks

 Bill

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Bill
The clips are installed in the stainless moldings first and then the assembly is mounted to the convertible deck lid.

There is a good illistration in the 1961 assembly manual in section E sheet 4.
 

Chip Werstein  

 

 

 


**********

I have a 1960 corvette with dual 4 barrel cards and an automatic transmission .Did this model have a transmission  oil cooler in the radiator? My radiator is not set up and I do not have any lines

Thanks for your help

Jeff


From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer:

Due to the horsepower to weight ratio of early Corvettes they did not use a transmission cooler so the transmission itself has 2 brass plugs installed blocking the passages where lines would connect. 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have owned my 1962 corvette (# matching) for almost 9 years and I’m going to have the second gear synchronizer replaced. My question is that I dropped the rear driveshaft from the differential, but the front slip yoke isn’t budging. I sprayed penetrating oil on it but hasn’t come lose yet. Has anyone have any ideas? I don’t want to damage my T10.

Thanks
Kevin

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter advisor:  For some reason, GM decided in model year 1962, to add a ¼ inch spacer between the transmission mount and the tail shaft.  I surmise that GM wanted to cut down on the drive shaft angle for some reason but you must install this special spacer if you want to add a Muncie for speed transmission. All 62 C1s had this special spacer. I worked on a 56 C1 years ago and I pulled the motor and transmission and could not get the drive shaft splines/yoke splines to line up when I went to reinstall the drive shaft in the transmission.  56 C1s had a metal protection plate in the transmission tunnel and this was my problem in getting the yoke and output shaft splines to line up.  Lowering the transmission a little bit solved the problem and everything went together and worked just fine.  Maybe try lowing the transmission at the transmission mount will allow the yoke to come out easily…..give it a try before beating on the transmission drive shaft as you will have to remove the transmission mount to remove the transmission in the first place.  Good luck with this problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter advisor:

Kevin

 
Usually the reason for the driveshaft not easily sliding off the trans out put shaft is that the splines on either the output shaft or yoke are twisted. In the past I have had to pry or carefully hammer the yoke out of the trans. Once apart, determine which parts are damaged and replace as necessary.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 59 corvette that is supposed to be original but the engine ID stamp is SAW903. I am stumped! My understanding is it should start with “F” or “T”. Casting # is 3794226 D2463 on the block, and the intake casting# is3746829  C69. I am a new member and could use your help.
Thx,
Lou

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Louis,
I hate to be the bearer of bad news but....an engine with the engine suffix SA and a casting date of D2463 is most likely a 250 HP 327 from a 1963 Chevy B body Passenger car w/ automatic & A/C. Casting date was April 24, 1963.
Your casting number should be 3756519 and a cast date at least two-three weeks prior to your car's build date.
The intake manifold is the cast iron for the 283 cu-in 230 HP w/4-barrel Carter WCFB carb.   The cast is March 6, 1959 & may be original depending on your vehicle build date. Build dates are calculated fairly acurately in the NCRS Corvette Birth-order book from the VIN number.
You might get lucky & find the car build date on the distributor tag on the vertical shaft just below the distributor cap, if it is actually the original distributor. The 230 HP distributor P/N was 1110946."
A Corvette 230 HP/ 283 cu-in from 1959 MY would have a stamped code of Prefix letter "F", (month A-L because letter I was not used for Sept), day (1-31), year (8 or 9), application Suffix letters "CQ".

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Living in Belgium an relatively new owner of a 1954 C1 I encounter problems ordering spares. 
Groessmueller seems closed/not replying. 
Could you recommend suppliers with 54 spares and good (web) documentation for ordering?
Thanks in advance
Hans

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Hans,
   I too have a '54 Corvette and it is Venetian red. I too had an issue finding unique parts for the '53 - '55. I was lucky finding parts from Mary Jo who used to specialize in these models. She is still in business and her web site is  www.VetteGal.com and now she sells thru ebay. Her e-mail isVetteGal@gmail.com  or  Mj@VetteGal.com  
Try her out.
Good luck & Merry Christmas,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

To prevent  front wheel bearing early damage what is the dimension of offset that one should be looking for?  Would it be zero and how are these measurements described?  Thanks, Dave.  4053.

 

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dave:  The offset you need is zero, and for the front wheels only.  This is true for all cars unless the front hub is designed to handle an offset with the original front wheels. Offset does not pose a problem with the rear wheel bearings because the rear axle bearing already is offset inward from the axle flange and the offset loads are absorbed by the rear wheel bearing and the differential side bearing, which can easily handle additional offsets.

 
If you are purchasing new wheels, the manufacturer tells you about any offset.  Keep in mind that aftermarket wheels wider than 5.5 inches make steering very difficult unless you install an aftermarket power assisted steering system in your car.  If you are buying used wheels and you don't know the manufacturer or the model number, you can measure it this way.  First, measure the distance between the flanges where the tire mounts.  Then divide this measurement by two.  Then do your best to measure the distance between the back surface of the wheel that mounts to the wheel hub and the the inside surface of the wheel flange.  You have to estimate this as best you can, because it can't be directly measured with a ruler, so you have to"eyeball" it.  Put a straight edge across the back of the wheel and measure the distance from the back mounting surface to it.  Then measure the distance from the inside of the wheel flange to the straight edge and subtract this from the other measurement.  This should give you a pretty accurate measurement.  You should be accurate to within one quarter of an inch.  This measurement equals one-half of the distance between the flanges for zero offset.  Offsets of one-half inch or less should not pose a big maintenance problem.  Greater than one-half inch will cause a maintenance problem with the small outer wheel bearing.  Keep in mind, that if a wheel bearing fails and seizes up, it will cause damage to the spindle that the bearings ride on.  Nobody makes a reproduction spindle that I know of, so you will have to find a used one.  Any 1949-1954 Chevy sedan spindle should work.

 
The reason that I know this is that a good friend of mine has a 1972 Dodge Charger with aftermarket aluminum wheels that have an offset.  The outer wheel bearings, which are tapered roller bearings, fail on a regular basis.  He loves those aluminum wheels, so he puts up with the maintenance problem.  He checks those outer wheel bearings on a very regular basis.

 
Larry Pearson

**********

I'm restoring a 1962 corvette and have a paint question. Center section to the under body fiberglass is supposed to be un-painted, there is an extreme amount of grease from the driveshaft,
I'm concerned that the grease may have stained the fiberglass. How does this impact the judging if i can't get the stain removed. Also any ideas on how to remove the stain.
your help would be appreciated.
Thanks
Rick


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Rick,
 

Your question could probably best be answered in the NCRS Judging Guide for 1962 Corvettes as to whether or not the NCRS judges deduct points for grease on the bottom side of the transmission/ drive shaft.

Kind of like asking if your homeowners association can make you sell your home if your lawn has dandelions----you have to read the rule book.


 

However, removing the grease/stain is a different issue. Clean the underside the same as you would the engine compartment: scrape off the grease & dirt sludge with a plastic putty knife, spray on a foaming engine cleanser such as Gunk, let it work, soft bristle brush the area and rinse with a garden hose. Repeat process until you're satisfied.

Find a hoist, wear a disposable hooded poncho & have fun.

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Rick:  I have a 62 and went through what you are trying to do in 1974.  This was for the Western States Corvette Club (WSCC) judging, which, at the time, was cleanliness only.  They sent a skinny judge under the car to check for dirt and grease on top of the frame and the driveshaft tunnel, and I passed.  I won the Sweepstakes award at that show, which was at the 1974 WSCC National Convention in Los Angeles, so I know how to clean this area.

 
Since the car body is fiberglass and will not rust, no special effort was made at the factory to paint the underbody.  And undercoat was never used in this area or on the frame at the factory.   What it got, to some degree, which varies  from car to car, is overspray from the grey primer and the final color coat.  For example, on my 62, the bottom of the doors was mostly grey primer with a light color coat.  It is highly unlikely that this overspray reached the driveshaft tunnel, so bare fiberglass is expected to be there.  What I did was to carefully scrape off the grease buildup in the area of the transmission u-joint with a putty knife and then I used lacquer thinner and paper towels to finish the cleaning.  Lacquer thinner will not harm fiberglass in any way, and may help to remove any staining on the fiberglass.  I did not notice any staining from the u-joint grease on the driveshaft tunnel fiberglass on my 62.  However, my 62 did have a small factory repair using woven fiberglass mat and clear resin towards the rear end of the fiberglass tunnel.  I understand that this was commonly done in this area, and should be acceptable to NCRS judges, if they can see it.  Under no circumstances should you use a paint stripper like JASCO to remove any staining you encounter.  JASCO will destroy the resins in the fiberglass, and you can not recover from this type of damage.

 
NCRS Flight Judging normally does not involve raising the car on a lift, and without a lift, the judges cannot even see the driveshaft tunnel area.  So don't worry about it.  A lift is normally only used for Bowtie judging at the National Convention.

 
Larry Pearson

**********

Were the factory installed hood hinges bare metal or painted black on a 57 corvette?
>
> Doug

 

From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer:  Hood hinges, latches, and locks were all installed prior to paint and blackout process. They were cad plated and also exhibited some amount of rust inhibitor spray so even though they were sprayed black during blackout process the paint did rub off very easily.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Guys,

I had Crager G/T wheels on my 61 in the 70's and would like to put a set back on. I was going to get the American Racing Torg Thrust D wheels, 15x6 VN105D. I was going to order them from CARiD in New Jersey, but they told me they wouldn't fit my car. They couldn't tell me why when asked. Has anybody used these wheels, they are similar to the ones on the 57 on the inner cover the Winter 2018 issue. Thank you for your time.


Mike

 

From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer: 

My shop installs 17”x7” Retro Billets (a chrome copy of the Torque Thrust) on C1 and C2 all the time with no issues. 225 45 17 tires. Sometimes very minor rub on full turn. You should be fine just check clearances before driving. If you have backspace or offset questions feel free to call me. 
Michael Capozzio
Classic Corvette Restorations
 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Michael:  Make sure that the center line of whatever aftermarket wheel you choose is directly over the large wheel bearing.  If the center line is offset, in or out, the small outer wheel bearing will take on more of a load than it was designed for and it will fail.  This is true weather you are using the original ball bearings or after market tapered roller wheel bearings.  The ball bearings are more prone to failure than tapered roller bearings, so if you must have an offset, switch over to the aftermarket roller bearings, and check the small outer bearing frequently for signs of failure.  I suggest at least every 10,000 miles.

 

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From; Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

I have seen, on a number of occasions, some owners of original C1 Corvettes that still have the original front brake drums riveted to the front wheel bearing housings.  The rivets must be removed for after market wheels to be installed as the rivets will not allow the aftermarket wheels to fit flush against the front wheel bearing housings.  Horrible out of balance conditions and possible loss of the complete wheels can result…..not good!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Good Morning
 
My question is on my 1960 Corvette hardtop, the (3) required hold down bolts, are they chrome, stainless, or otherwise?
 
Thank you.
Dennis


From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer: The bolt and receiver nut are stainless steel. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

I am a new member of a few months, can’t find my membership #.

 I have a 1959 that I am restoring as original and at present working on the steering. I am stumped on a simple item. The seal around the hole in the inner fire wall. Most suppliers offer 2 types of seals, a soft and a hard. Does this car take both or one or the other?

 Thanks, sorry to bother you for such a minor thing.

 Darrell

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Darrell,

The steering column outer plate & steering column outer seal are forward of the firewall. The steering column inner seal & steering column inner grommet are in the cabin behind the firewall. All 4 parts plus the attaching screws are required to seal around the steering column. Look on page 28 of Paragon Reproductions C-1 catalog for picture of the assembly.  

Good luck with your project,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

I'm looking at a 1961 corvette with 1459 original miles. White with silver coves and red interior. This is my first attempt at buying a vet of this year and I'm not sure what is good and bad. The car was repainted but was never sanded out. All numbers match. The rubber on the door seals look new but the glue job was sloppy. The dealer said all bushings were replaced but there isn't any documentation of this. The interior is very good except for a seam on the drivers seat coming apart. Some of the chrome has pits but looks like it was chromed over the pits. There is some slop in the steering wheel just not sure if it's more than an inch. There was surface rust on the Jack and handle in the trunk so I'm not sure if the trunk leaked or just moisture. The convertible top is new but it doesn't seal tight against the trunk. I'm not sure what they fit like when they were new.  All that being said its a 283  4b and they want $57.200 for it. I'm not a mechanic but can do some things so I realize a professional may be needed.  Do you think this is a good deal and what is critical to look for? This car was never titled and had 1 owner
>>>>
>>>> Mike


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,

 
All I can say is WOW! 1400 miles and never titled. There must be a great story behind this car, but I see some red flags here.

 
* being sold by a dealer. Is this a reputable Corvette dealer?

 
* any documentation on the one owner and where this car spent it's life?

 
* Why were the bushings replaced ......what bushings. The a arm bushings could not possibly be worn out in 1400 miles.

 
* Why was a low miles car repainted and re chromed?

 
* the original door, trunk and deck lid weatherstrips were attached with yellow glue which was applied in a very sloppy manner. Over the years it would have turned brown.

 
* an almost new car should have very little steering play. It is adjustable.

 
*The poor top fit is most likely top frame adjustment or poorly installed top.

 
* Before spending the money I would have it inspected by an early Corvette specialist.

 
I wish I could offer more help but it's difficult to access any car without seeing it.

 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

When installing new drag link innards and tightening screw plugs on each end are these plugs fully tightened when you can slide cotter pin through holes while aligned with slot in plug?  4053 didn't pay attention when he disassembled drag link.  I  don't think that the plugs will tighten to the point cotter pin could be installed over face of plug regardless of slot position.   Thanks for being there.  DAVE. 
 


From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Dave,
The best exploded view of the C-1 drag link assembly that I have found to answer your question is on page 29 of the Paragon Reproduction C-1 parts catalog.

The short spring & spacer are installed in the short end of the link that connects to the third arm. The 2 longer springs & spacers are installed in the longer end that connects to the steering gear pitman arm.

Make sure that the four bearing surface cups are fully seated to the third arm or pitman arm studs so there is full contact between the bearing surfaces an the studs spherical surfaces. Mis-alignment of one of the bearing surfaces  may account for why your rebuild won't assemble properly.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

4053 is surprised to realize that all power systems in car are fed by a #12 gage wire with starter exception.  Without any current protection on this conductor how often have these wires burned up?  Does anyone know what the total current draw can reach with all systems operating?  Thanks, Dave.

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dave:  This red #12 gauge wire ends up going to the fuse block or the ignition switch and almost everything off of these are fused.  Four exceptions are the windshield wiper motor the power top motor, the power window motors, and the headlight switch.  All of these have internal or external circuit breakers.  I have never heard of this red 12 gauge wire burning up.

 
The total current draw depends on how many electrical appliances are in operation at once.  The small instrument panel bulbs are 2 1/2 watts each.  The fused appliances probably operate at less than 1/2 of the fuse rating.  Add it up.  The generator can produce 35 amps, and this was designed to handle all the expected loads plus charging the battery.  The voltage regulator limits the maximum output of the generator to 35 amps.  If the total load exceeds 35 amps, then the battery will provide the additional current, and the ammeter will show a discharge.  I have never seen this happen under normal driving conditions except at idle when the generator is taken out of the circuit by the voltage regulator, because it cannot provide 12 volts or more at idle speed.  The alternator, which replaced the generator in 1963, can provide enough output at idle.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,  

 I am looking to purchase a 1962 Corvette with a severely rusted frame.  I am planning to replace the frame with a stock frame but what other year C1 frames could be used without a great deal of alteration? 

 Thank you in advance for your answer,

 Daniel

 

Michael:  Make sure that the center line of whatever aftermarket wheel you choose is directly over the large wheel bearing.  If the center line is offset, in or out, the small outer wheel bearing will take on more of a load than it was designed for and it will fail.  This is true weather you are using the original ball bearings or after market tapered roller wheel bearings.  The ball bearings are more prone to failure than tapered roller bearings, so if you must have an offset, switch over to the aftermarket roller bearings, and check the small outer bearing frequently for signs of failure.  I suggest at least every 10,000 miles.

 

Larry Pearson

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  In all due respect I would highly recommend that you DO NOT purchase this 1962 Corvette unless you are absolutely stealing it. If the frame is that rusted out then so will all of the front and rear suspension parts as well as the rear leaf springs and sway bars.  You will have to do a basically complete  “body off” restoration which is extremely time consuming and very expensive if you have to sublet all the work out.  Buying a C1 or any Corvette in this condition is asking for a lot of trouble.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 56 corvette with a Muncie transmission that was incorrect for the year. I had the powerglide that came with the car rebuild. Turns out it is a passenger car powerglide with the corvette tailhousing. My question is do I have to use cooling lines or can I run it without the cooling lines to look correct because I know the corvette powerglides were air cooled. I appreciate your input.

 

Melody

 

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President Emeritus: No, your PG would be air cooled.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1962, 327 cu in, 340hp 4 speed.  This is not a judgeable car but one that is often driven so performance and reliability are more important then originality.  I haven't done a tune-up in many years.  With new technological advances I'd like to know what spark plugs, plug wires, distributor cap, points, rotor and condenser I should use?  Is Pertronix recommended?  Also, is there a preferred supplier?

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:    Your Corvette with the 340 horsepower option came from the factory with dual ignition points, condenser and dual window distributor cap.  The spark plug wires were the radio suppression type so not to interfere with the radio, if so equipped.  This is all “old school” and is not advisable for a car that is not judged and is a driver. I have installed many Pertonixs products in my client’s cars.  Their latest drop in electronic modules are exceptional easy to install with no air gaps required.  They provide a very hot spark with multiple sparks and an adjustable rev limiter.  Now none of this is at all necessary with a driver installation but worth the price in my opinion.  You should install their recommended hotter coil as well.  Once you install these parts you will never have to do it again.  The Pertronixs part number for their electronic module  is PNX-71181 and their recommended coil part number is PNX-40011.  These parts are readily available from Summit Racing, phone number 800-230-3030.  Original AC spark plugs are no longer available and I use Autolite 85s. I use Standard Ignition parts for the rotor and distributor cap…the rotor is DR-311T and cap is DR-429  Your Corvette came with a dual window cap for adjusting the points which you will no longer need to do.  Corvette Central offers a very superior replacement spark plug wire set with a life time warranty and cut to fit, their number 301161, phone number 800-345-4122. It is not rocket science to install these ignition products and once completed you will never have to do it again. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

61 wiper cable adjust.
 
How is it done?  My shop manual says press button on outer end of wiper transmission shaft.  What button?  I'm so confused.  Thanks, Dave.

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Dave,
 

First, the WSW cables on my C-1s are NOT adjustable. The cables are assembled from the wiper motor pulley to the two wiper shaft pulleys in the opposite direction so that the wiper arms move inboard together then outboard together at the same time. This is assuming that the three pulleys are tight to their respective shaft and the two knurled wiper shaft ends are each attached tightly to their wiper shaft.
 

My wiper arms are adjusted by removing the wiper arm assembly from its shaft, allowing the wiper motor to cycle to its stop/rest position, then reinstalling the wiper arms female knurl back onto the wiper shafts male knurl so that the wipers rest just above the windshield trim in the center of the windshield.

One or the other may have to be re-adjusted so that they have synchronous but opposite motion.
If it appears somewhat weak, sloppy & spastic in its movement, just remember it is a 57 year old machine.

That's why some owners upgrade to the new modern electric wipers & others just use Rainex and never turn them on.
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer:  Dave, C1 wiper transmissions do have a cable adjustment. The transmission has a set of spring loaded clutches built in. When you remove the wiper arm and push down on the center of the transmission post it will move slightly and releases the clutches. When installing cables you can push on the stub to release the cable tension and have someone pull on the cables from under the dash to gain a bit of additional length. Once installed push on the post again and the spring tension will take up the slack. Problem is the transmission is often worn or seized in which case it is much easier to just remove transmission from cowl, install cables on wiper drum, and reinstall transmission into cowl. Hope this helps. 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

The wiper cables are not really adjustable, but the cable tension can be increased. Over time the cables can stretch or become loose which reduces the effectiveness of the wiper system. To do this you push hard on the end of the wiper transmission shaft to depress it about 3/8". This action releases the shaft from the tension spring inside the transmission and allows the spring to tighten up which pulls the cable tight between the transmission and the wiper motor drum. Next release the shaft so it can return to it's original up position. Do both sides and the "adjustment" is complete.

 
Now for the bad news. Most of the time on old Corvettes one ore both shafts will not depress because they have rusted/corroded or somehow frozen in place. For repair the transmissions must be removed and sent out for rebuilding. ( Mary Jo Rohner in Sand Diego does this.....The last pair she did for me was $140).  Removing and re installing the transmissions is quite challenging, especially the drivers side. You may want to have a competent Corvette shop do the job for you.

 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

1960 Corvette 230 HP
 
Does anyone have any ideas on how to replace the rollers in the turn signal housing?
 
Thank you,
Terry

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Terry,
 

Almost any part is replaceable.

The trick is either having the correct nomenclature to find it in the various catalogs OR have a good picture of what you're looking for. Try the attached pictures from Paragon Reproductions catalog to see if you find it. There are lots more pics where these came from. 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Good luck in your search.
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Terry.
I suspect there is a way to replace the rollers......after all someone put it together in the first place. But i have never seen it done or know anybody who has done it. The easy way out is to buy a reproduction. Both Paragon and Corvette Central offer this part for around $60.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

1962 Corvette

 
1) I've been told that the carburetor is not correct.  What is the correct carburetor?
2) What is the correct torque for lugnuts?

The car is a 4-speed with 340hp and has a single 4bbl carb on it now ..... evidently not the correct carb.  The person told me he thought it might be an AFB Carter 3269S and I'm trying to confirm that (and locate one).

SS

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The correct cab for you 62 340hp Corvette is a Carter AFB 3269S. They were used on 62 300 and 340HP engines with manual trans. I believe they were also used on 62 passenger cars with the 300 Hp 327 and manual transmission. Note that they also had a stamped date under the part #. Example......H 61 which indicates August 1961. This is the date on my 62 340HP Corvette which was built October 30, 1961.

I am not aware of any published torque spec for lug nuts. My feeling has always been REALLY TIGHT.
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  If you have an adjustable torque wrench 60 foot pounds should be more than enough.  Use increments starting at 20 foot pounds and increase to 40 and then 60 foot pounds using a “star” pattern from one lug nut to another so that each lug nut is tightened in three increments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Gentlemen
I have a 61 corvette fuelie. When i put it back together 20 years ago when brake pedal was pushed the gas gauge moved up. It didn't bother me then . Now it does . Replaced the float assembly in tank , Didn't help. I've heard of this problem before.
HELP
Thanks 
Jim S

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Jim S:  All 1961 and 1962 Corvettes have this problem.  It was this way when the cars were new, and Chevrolet must have gotten complaints from owners of these cars when they were new.  Maybe there is a service bulletin on it for the dealers, but I have not seen it.

 
Here is the cause.  First, remember that the fiberglass body does not conduct electricity, so all electrical appliances in the car (all lights, the radio, the heater, the windshield wiper motor, the clock, the gas tank) must end up connecting to the engine block (not the frame), which is the ground return point for everything electrical on the Corvette.  When the two additional taillights were added in 1961, Chevrolet did not increase the size of the ground return wire in the taillight wire harness to accommodate the additional current flow from the two added taillights.  It remained at 18 gauge, and this wire size is too small to handle all this current.  It should have been increased to 16 gauge.  The gas tank gauge shares this ground wire (it connects to the taillight ground wire inside the wire harness).  When the brakes are applied, the additional current overwhelms the 18 gauge ground wire, and the result is that a small voltage develops on this ground wire, which affects the gas gauge reading.  It gets even worse when the running lights are on.  Additionally, the taillights and the license light are never as bright as they could be if there was a larger wire size used on the ground return.  The gas gauge usually flickers whenever the turn signal is activated.  I have a 1960 Corvette, and none of this happens with it.  

 
How to fix the problem.  The most direct way is to run a 16 gauge wire from the gas tank ground and route it under the rocker panel and up to the instrument panel and tie it to one of the bolts that hold the instrument housing to the metal framework under the cowl, which is the instrument panel ground.  Leave the gas tank ground wire in place.  This should help the taillight ground problem, and the lights should burn brighter.

 
If your car came with a factory radio, there should be two large braided ground straps going from the front engine mount crossmember  to the frame, one on each side.  This gives the frame a good ground connection to the engine block. This was done so that the frame could act as the ground plane for the radio antenna.  On metal cars, the car body is the ground plane.  If these ground straps are not present, then the frame gets grounded to the engine block through the master brake cylinder line, and this is not good.  A simple fix in the trunk then would be to connect a 16 gauge wire from one of the taillight housing mounting studs to the antenna mast ground wire, which is a braided copper conductor that connects to a bolt that connects to the frame.  I have not tried this, but it should work if the frame has a good ground connection to the engine block, and if the bolt to the frame is not rusted out.  Water can collect in this cavity and cause rusting.  Try this out with a jumper wire with alligator clips.

 
On the subject of ground wires, if your Corvette has a radio, there should be three wires connecting to the upper rear rocker arm cover screws.  On the passenger side, there should be two wires, a green one connecting to the wiper motor mounting plate and a second heavy black wire connecting through the dash to the radio mounting bracket.  On the driver side, there must be a large black with white stripe wire connected here.  This is the main ground return for all the car electrical systems except the wiper motor and the radio.  It must be there and in good shape.  It conducts a lot of current.

 
You mention that you replaced the gas tank sender unit.  If you weren't careful, this can cause another problem.  On the factory installation, the steel arm with the float mounted on it was carefully bent so that the gauge would read accurately.  Service replacement units, including NOS AC units, may not be bent properly.  I installed a new AC unit obtained many years ago from Chevrolet and I discovered the hard way that the car runs out of gas at 1/8 tank reading.  It should have some gas left when the gauge reads E.

 
Larry Pearson
 

**********

I have a 1960 corvette with the auto transmission .Does anyone know where I can buy a new or used neutral switch assembly,I  need all the assembly? Or is there a conversion  aftermarket kit out there? I had the transmission completely rebuilt but missing these parts.

Thanks

Jeff

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jeff,
Look for Corvette Central P/N 591055.
Regards,
Bill Huffman, Pres
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Please let me know the dimensions on a 1960 original front sway bar from center of eye to center of eye. Mine is a 13/16 bar and measures 34 ½” wanting to know if that is correct.

Thanks

Jeff

From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer:   Jeff, you have the correct sway bar. 

 

 


 

 

 

**********

Where can I find instructions for removing and reinstalling the radiator in my 1957 Corvette?  Thanks!

 

From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio Restorer:  Ron, the ST-12 service manual is a great source for for this but owning a ‘57 myself and doing C1 restoration for a living I can give you the quick breakdown. Drain radiator (of course). Remove top hose. Remove fan belt (to aid in removal of upper fan shroud). Removal of hood is not necessary but helps. You can simply remove the hood support and use a stick or similar item to prop open further then normal. Remove the bolts holding fan shroud to support. Remove shroud. Lower radiator hose clamp is tricky. It may or may not be necessary to unbolt and move the lower fan shroud shielding out of the way to get to the lower hose clamp. Remove the two front hood alignment blocks that are just above radiator tank. Now, there should be (not always as they are often not replaced) two lower radiator bolts that are accessible in the wheel house area behind the front tire. Once they are removed radiator should be able to be slid strait up. Best to have two people doing this to evenly lift it. Reinstall in reverse order. If the two lower bolts were missing replace them. They really are often missing. This is always a great time to replace thermostat too. At least a 180 degree. No 160. System needs the pressure build to properly cool. Hope this helps.
 

 

**********

Dear Tech Helpers:

 
I own a 61 with a 283/230 hp V-8 build date November 1960.  I have owned the car for about 2 years and it is in very good driver condition with much of its original equipment in place.  The drive train is numbers matching. 
 
The radiator has developed a small intermittent leak from the top of the tank where the “lollypop” dome joins the discharge tube.  I am looking for advice on the best way to address this before I take the car to a local radiator shop for a repair.  I was wondering if the breach can be cleaned and soldered and if so, what is the proper way to do this?  Or, could I use an epoxy repair to caulk the leak at least temporarily?  If so, what do you recommend?
 
I have a black aluminum Harrison radiator with the correct stock number in the car that appears to be period correct from the design but when I checked, the date stamp on the plate dates the radiator January of 62 (62A).  So, it appears to be a replacement installed some time ago, perhaps early on in the life of the car.  Also, I understand from my research that early 61’s used the same model radiator but it was left  unpainted.  Can anyone verify this for me since if I need to eventually replace the radiator, I would want to do so with one that is correct for my build date.
 
 
Thanks in advance for your help on this.
 
Joe

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor: 

Joe:  You don't say if this car is to be NCRS judged or if it is just a "driver".  If it is to be judged, then acquire a copy of the NCRS judging guide and follow what it says.  Is the leaking radiator a Harrison aluminum radiator?  If so, a radiator shop can't fix it with solder, because aluminum can't be soldered like copper and brass can.  Radiator shops typically use epoxy cement to repair aluminum radiators, so you can do this yourself.   A leak in this area is common and you can repair it with JB Weld.  Carefully clean all paint, moisture, and corrosion from the repair spot before applying the JB Weld.  It is best to do this with the radiator out of the car so it can be tipped to get the JB Weld to stay in the proper location.  Heating JB Weld speeds up the curing process, because it is difficult to keep it from sagging before it cures.  My late 1962 still has the original 62B radiator in it and I repaired it in this area over 40 years ago, and it is still holding up.  But I seldom drive it.  Be advised that when these Harrison aluminum radiators are taken out of service and dry out, severe internal corrosion can take place.  Many restorers keep these aluminum radiators filled with coolant while restoring their cars to prevent this corrosion problem.  Or try filling the radiator with nitrogen gas to prevent this oxidation.  Most premium tire shops use nitrogen gas to fill new tires.

 
The earliest 1961 base engine cars used the 1960 copper radiator.  Harrison aluminum radiators were an option on the 1960 Corvettes. The early Harrison aluminum radiators came in  bright aluminum or black anodized aluminum (not painted).  Some of these early radiators had aluminum top tanks on them.  Harrison aluminum radiators cool much better than any copper radiator can that fits in the same space.  This is essential for 62 and later Corvettes with the 327 engines.  Always use full strength green antifreeze filled to a 50-50 dilution with distilled water from the grocery store.  Don't use pre-mix antifreeze, because you don't know what kind of water they diluted it with.   Tap water can have minerals in it that can damage your aluminum radiator.  De-ionized water is available commercially.  It is used to clean corrosion from metal containers.  Some radiator shops use it to clean copper radiators and gas tanks.  If you use it to dilute your antifreeze, it will immediately dissolve your aluminum radiator.
 

 
Complete, correct and dated reproduction radiators can be purchased from a company named DeWitt.  They know what configuration your car needs and can build an exact reproduction of it.  But this doesn't come cheap.  Plan to spend at least $1000 for one of their radiators.  Go online to find them.

 
Larry Pearson

**********

I am a recent member of SACC and am looking for somebody in the central part of California to install a new top in my 1957 Corvette.  I have heard that there is somebody that will even do house calls.  Anybody know of this?
 
Jay

 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter President: 

Jay,

 
Adam Parker from Phoenix is probably the best there is for C-1 convert tops 480-251-6352. Not sure he's doing it any more but if he got a group in Calif who needed tops he would he would come over for a week and install the tops at your house. Check with him. He's done several tops for me and many for SOCALSACC members. Also Sully's in Fresno 559-291-8680, but I have never used them.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

Hi

 I have a 1957 Corvette in Venetian Red with a Beige interior. I was wondering what is the correct color of the trunk matt, red or black?

 Thanks, Bob  

From:  Michael Capozzio, Restorer in Ohio:  Normally the 56-57 trunk mat is red for red colored interior and black for beige colored interior. 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a '59 Vette and the fuel gauge pegs to the right when the key is in the start position. I have confirmed that the ground is connected to the back of the gauge; where do I go from here? Is my sending unit toast? 
 

From: Michael Capozzio, Restorer in Ohio:  The back of the fuel gauge has 2 wires. The pink is 12 volts power. The brown is ground with variable resistance coming from the sending unit. Disconnect the brown from the fuel gauge and see if it goes to “E” with key on. Also, using a multimeter set to ohms check the resistance of the brown wire. It should go from basically 0 ohms empty tank to about 30 ohms full tank. Always best to pull sending unit from tank and check resistance as you move float. If you decide to replace sending unit be careful as cheaper units do not have correct resistance to make gauge read properly. Best solution is to rebuild original sending unit. If it checks out okay and you decide to rebuild gauge there are several reputable rebuilders out there. 

 

 

 

**********

Was getting ready for parade and stopped at bank.  Car now won't shift into any of the 4 gears but I can force it into reverse but even then it won't move.
I'm hoping it's just a linkage problem and not the transmission itself.  
It's a 283 four speed.  Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance.

 
Keith

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Keith

I had a similar situation with one of my cars. Turns out the transmission had locked it self in 2 gears.  I put the shifter in neutral and got under the car to check the position of the 3 levers on the trans. Reverse and 1-2 levers were in neutral. 3-4 lever was slightly engaged in 3rd. I moved it a very small distance and it clicked into neutral. Problem solved but i dont know what caused it in the first place.

Chip Werstein

 


 

 

From: Michael Capozzio, Ohio:  Try manually putting shift arms in transmission into neutral. If it’s stuck in gear it will go into reverse but will bind and not move. If the arms won’t go into reverse it may have a broken shift fork. 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello !

Previous member has a question about making a strong repair to the
chrome door post on a '62.  Previous owner was using the post as a
handle to close the door and has resulted in a week post attachment. 
What is the best way to reattach the post so that it will become an
integral part of the door again.  We won't be using the post as a
handle, but there is considerable mechanical advantage acting on the
attachment point.

Thanks,

Gary
 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Corvette central offers door post repair. The tabs  are broken because the windshield was not shimmed properly at the rear of the post. Consult aim for more info.
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi guys,
 
I’m prepping my car for the NCRS National meet in Las Vegas in July. I got a call from the National Judging Chairman concerning the state of my VIN tag on the steering column. Apparently it was determined from photos taken at previous Regional meets (all Top Flight results) that the tag is not a factory applied tag. I was told this is a common issue with ‘62s because the spot weld is not that secure. I was asked to check the frame stamp to verify and to obtain a California state issued VIN Tag to bring with me to the meet. While all documentation indicate the correct and matching VIN # apparently I need this document.
Has anyone had this problem and does anyone know the quickest way to get it resolved. Unfortunately the meet is only 6 weeks away and DMV isn’t usually work in an expedited mode.
 
Thanks for the help!
 
Steve

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

I had a similar situation with the DMV on my '54 when I changed to YOM plates. They needed to verify the VIN on the frame did agree with the door VIN #. They were not able to crawl under the car to verify the VIN # on the frame so, they referred me to the CHP. I called the local (Ventura) CHP office and made an appointment to have them verify and they set it up in less than 2 weeks.
   Hint- Locate and clean the frame VIN # (I believe it is on the frame in '62?) before you take it to the CHP. They will give you the proper paperwork for the DMV which you can use to show to the NCRS.
 
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman
Secretary SACC

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Steve:  The issue is that the NCRS "experts" have analyzed the characters and shape of your VIN tag from photographs, and feel that it is a reproduction.  You need to check this out, because if the NCRS judges at the Las Vegas National Convention determine that the tag is a reproduction, they might fail your car even if the VIN number on the tag matches the frame number.  You need to compare your tag with a known "good" tag and carefully compare the size and shape and spacing of the characters and the tag itself.  Do the spot welds look right, or is it glued or pop riveted on?  If the tag is a reproduction, but you can prove that the VIN matches the frame stamping, will they pass the car?  It is hard to see or photograph the stamping on the top of the frame without cutting a hole in the floor pan or taking the body off the frame.  If your frame is rusty on top, the frame stamping may not be legible.

 
It is unfortunate that this issue did not come up at a Chapter or Regional judging, but the annual National Convention judges usually are the most experienced in the Club, and they have the last word.

 
A California State issued VIN tag is a sticker that DMV makes up to replace a completely missing VIN tag.  Your VIN tag is not missing.  If your frame stamping VIN is different from the steering column VIN, your car may have been stolen.  Nothing but bad news here.  My 62 was stolen on November 3, 1971, and I am sure that it is out there somewhere.

 
Larry Pearson
 

 

**********

Hello Folks,
I feel like I know what I am doing in this 59 restoration but instead of telling you how hard I have tried to determine if I have a early 59 or a late 59; could you please tell me if there is an easy way to know? 

VIN = J595107364

 
Thank you
Darrell

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

This car # 7364 was built May 8, 1959. Total 59 corvette production was 9670 which means your car was in the last 25% of the cars built for that model year. This makes it a late car rather than early. I believe there may have been some small differences between early and late 59's like carpet style and speaker grill,  but I don't have good data on that subject. I would suggest contacting the NCRS 59 team leader for additional accurate info.

 
Chip Werstein 

 

 

 

 

**********

I ordered a new fuel pump from paragon and the fittings are 180 degrees opposite my original pump.  Are there different configurations for other fuel supply systems?  I have 1 4bbl.  My car is a 61 and engine is a 64 327 but fuel line on frame is in original location I believe.

Dave

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter advisor: 

Dave:  I still have the original pump from my first 1962, and it is configured exactly like the service replacement pump you received from Paragon.  The original AC catalog number was 4656, and that number is stamped on the edge of the mounting flange at the 2 o'clock position.  The top is marked "AC" in the original mold, and the aluminum bottom cover is marked "AC" in large letters.  The original brass inlet fitting is a hex shaped 45 degrees, not the 90 degree fitting you show.  This fitting is available as a reproduction.  The outlet fitting is a brass 90 degree fitting facing upward, not the straight fitting you show.  The original all steel fuel line to the carburetor had a "dog leg" shape to it to connect it to the 90 degree fitting.  You should be able to obtain a reproduction of this line from the suppliers.  Your car originally came with a Carter WCFB carburetor with the inlet in front left side.  If you are using some other type carburetor, like Holly, the original style steel line won't work.  An AFB Carter carburetor requires a different shaped fuel line from the pump.  The original AFB carburetors used on the 300 and 340 hp engines had a glass bowl fuel filter feeding into a threaded inlet on the carburetor, so the gas line from the fuel pump was very different.  The WCFB carburetors had a flared fitting for the inlet and there was a bronze filter behind the inlet fitting inside the carburetor.

 
If you want to modify the new pump to be configured like your old pump, it is easy to do.  Just remove the 10 screws that hold the bottom casting to the top casting and re-orient the bottom until it matches your old unit. The cover screws are evenly spaced, so you can do this.  When replacing the screws, you must compress the the actuator arm in a vice until the rubber diaphragm is completely level with the mounting surface before installing the mounting screws.  Tighten all the screws completely in a cross sequence before removing the pump from the vice.

 
Larry Pearson


From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter advisor:  Dave, Paragon sells a reproduction 4656 pump that is spot on. It is made here in los angeles. They re cast the orignal parts and even stamp 4656 on the flange. I have purchased several over the years and never had a problem.
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Can you please confirm that an original C1 lug wrench has a "0" on it, and fits a 7/16-20 thread with an external measurement of 3/4"?

 
Also, do you have any idea where I can get a horizontal metal reinforcement piece that is riveted to the fiberglass to support the convertible top.  This piece fits right behind the seats.  Unfortunately, my ex-restoration person lost mine!

 
Thanks for your help.

 
George
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

George:  You don't say what year C1 you have.  Are you restoring the car for NCRS judging or for a driver?  If for NCRS, you need to obtain a copy of the judging guide for your year and follow what they say for the lug wrench.  Otherwise, anything that fits your lug nuts and fits in the trunk will do.  Go to an auto salvage yard for this. Or buy a 4-way combination lug wrench at your local auto parts store. You will also need a large screwdriver to remove the wheel covers.  Corvette Central sells an "exact" reproduction of the lug wrench, but it is very expensive.

 
The horizontal steel reinforcement piece for the convertible top is not "behind the seats".  It is inside the gas tank area, and it should still be there.  Why would anyone remove it?  This reinforcement was there when the body was built, regardless of weather the car originally came with a convertible top.  If it really is "gone", call Corvette Central or Paragon to see if you can get a used replacement.  This is not a high demand item.

 
If you are talking about the left and right vertical reinforcement plates, they are behind the seats and could have been removed and lost.  They were only there if the car came with a convertible top and were painted the body color.  I don't think they are reproduced, so you will have to find used replacements.  Try the above two sources if you need these.

 
Larry Pearson


 

**********

I am looking to restore the trunk area of my 1961 Corvette.  My car is Ermine White (believed to be the original color from all forensic inspection) with white coves and red interior and I enjoy driving her regularly.  The car is in 95% of stock condition following what I was told was a cosmetic restoration in the 1980s and still holding up well.  At that time, the former owner chose to have the inside of the trunk and convertible top compartment painted black.   I would like to gradually restore the car to original condition and would appreciate any information that you can share. 
 
I have the following questions:
 
  1. Paint Color:  Am I correct that the interior of the trunk area and spare tire well are to be painted the same color as the exterior of the car?
  2. Spare Tire Well:  My car happened to come with one Firestone Bias Ply White Wall Tire that does not fit into the well without the plywood top ( I do have the original top) sitting into the depression of the rim of the well.  (the four driving tires have been changed to radials).  I suspect that the bias ply tire is not an original relic but rather a later reproduction that appears to fat for the height of the well.  My question is, did the original tires fit into the well such that the original plywood cover fits neatly into the rim of the well? 
  3. Jack, handle & tire iron:  Alas, the car did not come with its original jack, handle and tire iron and after being frustrated in my search for originals at various venues, I would like to buy a quality reproduction jack, handle and tire iron and would like your recommendation on the right source for such parts.
 
Thanks again in advance as always for the advice.  I truly appreciate being part of SACC.
 
Regards,
 
Joe
 
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

Joe:  If you plan to have your car judged by NCRS, you should obtain a copy of their Judging Guide and follow the details exactly.  There are a lot of nit-picky things they want to see.  So I will assume that you want a correct "driver" car.  In answer to your questions:

 
1.  The entire trunk area including the area behind the cardboard should be painted Irmine White.  The entire convertible top area should be painted Irmine White, including behind the seats.  I have one 60 and two 62's.  The trunk cardboard and trunk mat should match the interior color.

 
2.  All the wheels, including the spare, should be painted Irmine white.  If you have the optional 5.5 inch wheels, they should be painted black.  Today's reproduction 6.70x15 bias ply tires are wider than 6.7 inches and won't fit in the tire well.  The original 6.70x15 tires fit in the well perfectly.  Both my 62's have original 6.70x15 spare tires, and they fit in the well perfectly.  If you want your reproduction 6/70x15 tire to fit, let the air out and carry a portable electric tire pump in the car.  What I did on my 60, I bought a 6.40x15 tire for the spare.  It fits perfectly.

 
3.  Corvette Central is my favorite source for reproduction items.  However the reproduction scissors jack they sell is not considered to be safe to use, and it is very expensive.  It just looks correct.  This same jack is in my 60, and when I got the car, it was literally in pieces.  One of my 62's had nothing.  I bought a quality scissors jack from Pep Boys and modified the handle to fit in the slot in the trunk floor.  I got a lug wrench at a salvage yard.  This was 40 years ago.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

**********

I just put on new rear shock on my 62 Vette because I found the old ones were bad. The suspension was bottoming out hitting the bumper stops hard.  After the shocks it's better but still bottoms out when I hit dip in the road.  Is this normal for these cars or what do you suggest.

thanks, Gary

 

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Gary if your leaf springs are original then I surmise that they are worn out and sagging.  You will need to have them removed and taken to a reliable leaf spring rebuilder.  Fellow contributor, Chip Werstein, can give you the original height specifications as these dimensions are very critical to get it right the first time. Replace all the rubber bushings and lubricate them in the shackles.  Good luck with your project as many C1 owners have crossed this bridge before and it is not Rocket Science to make this repair as the hardest part is finding somebody in your area who knows what they are doing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1960 corvette.VIN #00867S106796 should tag be on column or inside driver door?
Thanks
Jeff

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Jeff,

 
Your vin tag should be spot welded to the steering column.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 


 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Jeff,

 
Only early '60s had the VIN tag screwed to the door.  Your's is way past the date where they were moved to the steering column and welded.  Therefore, yours should be welded to the steering column.

 
Brad

 

 


 

 

**********

I have a 1956 corvette. My question is what kind of oil (and how much) do I put in the oil tube attached to the distributor and also I see oil caps on the generator. Does it need oil also? Thanks for you time.
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Both your generator and distributor should be lubricated with a couple drops of engine oil every 1000 miles. This is according to the Corvette shop manual ST 12 which every C-1 owner should have. It is available  from any Corvette parts supplier.

 
BUT if your distributor and/or generator has been rebuilt ( which is quite likely after 60+ years ) it will probably have sealed bearings which require no lubrication. If you were to oil sealed bearings i don't think it would cause any harm.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

Fellow members, 

 I’m going to attempt to reseal my washer pump.  Having had enough experience, I do not want to attempt this without a exploded drawing of a Trico vacuum pump. The factory manuals Chevrolet and Corvette supplements Do not touch on this procedure.  The service kit I purchased from  C.C. did not have this needed diagram. Would any of you be willing to share this information with the Corvette world and myself.  

Paul from Michigan
1960 2x4 270 hp


From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Capital Auto Restoration used to rebuild and restore C1 washer pumps, 301-948-9481….very expensive but they are not easy to do….good luck with this project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

I applaud your desire to do this yourself.  

 
Frankly, I've always relied on professionals for windshield wiper related rebuilds, specifically  SACC member, Tom Maxwell, who rebuilt two windshield motors and one windshield washer pump for me.  Unfortunately, Tom passed away a few years ago.  I believe his son, who worked with Tom, now operates the business.  The contact information I have is: Capitol Auto Restoration 301-948-9481.

 
Good luck, either way you go.

 


 


**********
I bought a car pretty much in pieces .Wondering what the piece was on each end of the grill .Was it fiberglass or metal was it paint car color or black? Also I am 6’4 any ideas to get little more room?

Thanks

Jeff

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jeff,
 

For the answer(s) to your first question, you need an 1960 Assembly Manual (Mid-America sells a good one), a C-1 parts catalog from Paragon Reproductios or Corvette Central to really see all the parts your car is missing.

On 1958-1962 Corvettes frontal area on either side of the grill opening is one fiberglass panel that entends from one wheel opening to the other. The intended function of the recessed areas on both sides is to provide an air inlet to cool the heavy duty racing brake (called "Big Brake") RPO.  Each side has an upper & lower diecast & chromed eyebrow trim bezel above & below the bumper. Since Big Brakes are a rare option, most owners paint the recessed area black.
 


 

Your second question is tougher.

Although some big guys own, drive & love them, the early Corvettes were designed for 5' 9" - 165lb people or very limber contortionists to be able to ingress/egress.    Depending on your difficulty here are some options: 15 inch steering wheel vs stock 17 inch, remove some seat padding, replace steering column with Ididit tilt column OR just drive it with the top down only.
 

Good luck with your project,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Jeff:  The 1961 and 62 seats were completely redesigned and you get about two inches more room room in both directions.  If you know someone with a 61 or 62, try it out.  My brother is 6'-4" and fits in my 62 fairly well and enjoys driving it.  The  problem is that the 61-62 seats mount to the floor completely differently than the pre-61 seats do.  But you con make it work.  Or buy a 61 or 62.  
Another possibility is that your seats are re-upholstered and have too much stuffing.  Both the bottom and back should be concave, not convex.  Most upholstery shops way over-stuff the C-1 seats.  I will try to send a photograph in a different email from a Motor Trend road test showing the seats in a new 1959 Corvette.

 
 
 
Jeff:  See the attached file for a photo from Petersen publishing showing Ray Brock sitting in a new 1959 Corvette.  Observe the passenger seat bottom and the pronounced depression in it.  This is a new car with new seats.  The 1960 seats are the same, except that the pleats go front to back.  If your seats are overstuffed, you may be able to gain as much as two inches in both directions.

 
Larry Pearson

 


 

 

 

**********

Please help me to clear some confusion I am having on my Trunk Mat. My question is, does the Trunk Mat go under the Trunk Liner or does it butt to it???
 
Thank You
Dennis
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I have an unrestored 1960 with the original trunk mat.  The mat buts up to the cardboard trunk liner.  You have to be able to remove the trunk mat to access the spare tire.  If it is under the cardboard liner you would have to remove the liner to remove the trunk mat to access the spare tire.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


**********

I am going to have my 61 T-10 rebuilt and mechanic suggested changing out course spline tailshaft and yoke for fine.  Is this a good idea?  Not a hard driver, worth the $?

 
From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  In my opinion it is not worth the money unless you were going to start drag racing with drag slicks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

The 57 through 62 Corvettes with the T-10 transmission all had a course spline output shaft and came with a long driveshaft yoke.  The long yoke was necessary because the rear axle movement up and down with the short driveshaft used in these cars caused a lot of in and out movement of the yoke in the transmission output shaft.  A short yoke, which the midyear Corvettes used, might disingage from the transmission tail shaft if the car encounters a large bump at speed.  Even the long yoke can disingage from the transmission if the rear axle rebound straps are missing. The Muncie transmissions came with a fine spline and used a short yoke because there is no up and down movement of the differential with the Stingray Corvettes.  It is my understanding that the late service replacement T-10's could be had with a fine spline output.  Corvette Central sells a long yoke with a fine spline so that Muncie transmissions can be installed in the C1 Corvette.  Because of the long driveshaft used in sedans, a long yoke was not needed.

 
In response to your question, it makes absolutely no sense to change to a fine spline output shaft in your 1961 Corvette.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1959 corvette 283 carb 4 speed

I want to take out the speedometer to have it fixed

Paul
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

Paul,

 

This is a pretty straight forward project but is not as easy as may seem to someone who has never done this before. You will need to completely remove the instrument housing containing all the gauges, the speedometer housing, the tachometer housing, the ignition switch, the headlight switch, the wiper transmission cable and the cigarette lighter.  The speedometer and tachometer cables will have to disconnected, the headlight switch harness, the ignition harness and the oil pressure line.  The main wiring harness connections to the gauges will all have to be disconnected as well as the instrument housing light bulbs.  I suggest that you remove the steering wheel in order to gain better access to all of the disconnections of the instrument housing.  Mark or write down all of the main wiring harness to instrument gauges connections for proper reassembly.  Patience is a virtue and good luck with this project.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I bought a 1960 corvette with engine and transmission removed. Getting ready to install the engine .It appears that the driver side engine mount frame bracket is higher than the one on the passenger side? Is this correct or should they be level from one side to the other? Are they adjustable or should I buy a replacement.Also I thought I would check all the steering and the 3 arm raises and lowers slightly when turning the wheel. Car has been sitting for along time so I thought I would replace the bearing and the seal and thoughts?

Thanks

Jeff

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jeff,
 

I've got more questions than answers here and a few red flags.
 

The two motor bracket mounting surfaces should be approximately level with the ground.

New brackets are available, but if you bought them, unless one is noticeably deformed I suspect they will be identical to what you have. The 3rd arm articulation makes me suspect uncorrected front end accident damage to either the frame or to the steering/suspension components. Checking the fender opening to tire height from left to right might give you a clue as to how much distortion you're dealing with. While you are replacing the 3rd arm bearing & seal, there are other components that contribute to steering instability. Wheel bearings, king pins, worn/poorly adjusted steering gear, drag link lube & adjustment and tie rod ends all need to be checked/lubed/replaced.

Good luck with your project,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Would like to set up fronts to match rears.  Any ideas?  Thanks, Dave
 


 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dave,

 
It's hard to tell from the pictures, but they look like chrome reverse wheels with 57-62 corvette centers.. The spinner and adapter are cool.......probably home made.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 


 

**********

I would like to know if I can lift car at a central point, front or back, and lift both wheels at the same time.   Pumpkin?  Thanks,  Dave


From Bill Huffman: 

Dave,
 

I have used a floor jack to raise my C-1s using a center lift point for many years.  I lift the front under the steering front cross member using a 16 inch long 2 x 4 or 2 x 6 cross-ways to distribute the load.

DO NOT USE THE THIRD ARM BEARING AS A SUPPORT. It is nodular cast iron & WILL break.

The rear can be lifted using the differential housing. However, here I also use a short 2 x 4 to distribute the load & not damage the paint.

 

The floor jack is for lifting only.


Put the jack stands under the car then remove the floor jack to relieve stress on the car frame & chassis.


Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

I would like to lift both wheels front or rear safely to place jack stands.  I don't want to twist body if possible. When lifted what is best location to set stands?  Thanks, Dave
 


From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The strongest and safest place to place your jack stands would be directly onto the main frame trusses that run front to rear.  Place the front stands just before the frame truss starts to turn inward at the engine firewall.  The rear stands should be placed at where the rear spring axles met the rear frame truss.  The stands should be directly across from each other. This arrangement will give total support to the body and attached suspensions parts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

**********

Hello to all,

I have a 1962 corvette and am thinking about getting the windshield washer pump going again.  I have two small rubber hoses coming out of the firewall up high on the passenger side and also have the washer fluid tank and pump.  I've been looking for a diagram to show me what parts are missing and how and where they go together.


What I do find is a diagram showing the windshield washer unit over on the drivers side rather than the passenger side by the battery, but I cannot find a picture showing where everything bolts up.


I would be grateful if you can point me to a picture showing how the unit goes together in the chassis on the passenger side.  (brackets and where they mount etc.)


Any and all help is appreciated.


Thanks again,
 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  If your 62 Corvette has any preexisting windshield washer parts and hoses on the passenger side it would indicate that your Corvette was fuel injected.  Al 1958-1962 fuel injected Corvettes had the windshield washer system installed on the passenger side because with the fuel injection air cleaner being mounted on the driver’s side it would have made it too difficult to service the washer bottle tank. Fuel injected Corvettes had a vacuum reserve tank bolted to a special nut plate on the inner fender as well as a special aluminum heat shield that was held on the inner fender near the battery.  This shield was held to the inner fender by three screws.  Purchase a 1962  Corvette assembly manual from either Paragon or Corvette Central and there is a chapter on the fuel injection option which gives a very detailed diagram of how all the windshield washer parts were located.  Good luck with your project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

"The 1960 Corvette is the first year that did not feature the VIN tag in the door jamb."
 
 Not case of My '60, VIN # 100.
 
 My VIN number IS on the door jamb !
 
 John

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

You are correct on both accounts!  The change of relocating the VIN plate from the front driver's door frame (with screws) occurred on the 1960 model, but did not actually happen until after serial number 1406, but before 1563.  After which, they were spot welded to the steering column.

 
So... your #100 1960 has the VIN number in the proper location.  I own #924 which, like yours, the VIN is located on the door frame.  If you have Noland Adam's Restoration Guide, this is referenced on page #255.
 

 

 

 

 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

In 1960 the vin moved from the door jam to tje steering column at vin 3000

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 


From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

John,
 

Having several 1960 Corvette owners in our chapter, in comparing our cars, we found that the switch in VIN location occurred between 28 Oct 1959 & 28 Dec 1959. The change was between VIN #s 1100 & 1900. Stamping the VIN # on the engine stamp pad occurred later, in early 1960.
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 


**********

what GM wheels interchange with a stock 59 corvette wheel 15 / 5?  it is said to be a 49 chevy sedan is this true?

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Original 1959 Corvette 15 X 5 wheels had the dogbone weld slot, not the riveted wheels that most swap meet vendors try to sell you. Also, after 60 years, most original rims will have worn, elongated or enlarged lug nut holes that are downright dangerous. If you have a driver as opposed to a matching numbers museum piece, it is far easier & less expensive to buy a new 4 wheel set from Corvette Central than it is to find a complete set of good original wheels.  https://www.corvettecentral.com/c1-53-62/wheels/hubcap-wheel/56-62-15-x-5-new-rim-wheel-welded-set-of-4-641143?returnurl=%2fc1-53-62%2fwheels%2fhubcap-wheel%2f 
 

Good luck with your project,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

The 55 and 56 Chevy wheel is nearly identical to the stock  56-62 Corvette wheel. They are 15x5, have the hubcap nubs and are rivited, not welded. Once installed on your car it is likely that no one will ever know they are not Corvette wheels except an NCRS judge and he'd have to be laying under the car to tell.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

I am not an experienced mechanic and have created a monster.  I have
 totally disassembled my '60 over the past ten years.  In that process I
 have removed the rear axles several years ago and am finally getting
back into reassembling the car.

 For the life of me I cannot find any detailed drawing, including the
 "official manuals" that shows how the axles fit into the differential
 and what holds them in.  I am now 72 and have a hard time remembering
 much of anything, so I do not remember how I took them apart.
 
 Can someone help describe the process of reassembling the axles to the
 differential?

 Also, I have already installed the drive shaft back into the drive
 train.  Do I need to remove the drive shaft and the front of the
 differential to be able to see into the differential to install the axles?

 Thank you
 
 Tom


From: Bill Huffman: Michigan Chapter President:Tom,

Almost any service question regarding your 1960 can be answered by the 1953-1962 Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12. Below is Section 4, Rear Suspension & Driveline.  Section 4, Rear Suspension & Driveline would be of help for you.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello:

 

I am looking for advice on how to rebuild my 1961 Corvette speedometer.  (VIN No. 10867S102739)

 The speedometer failed last year and when I removed the unit I found that a 3/8” piece of the tip of the old speedo cable (red plastic square shaped piece) had broken off in the back of the connection port.  I was able to remove this and then reinstalled the speedometer with a new cable from Corvette Central.  Unfortunately it appears that there is a bigger issue.  The speedo now moves but erratically and with a distressing ticking noise coming from the speedometer itself.  I am thinking now that the internal issue is what caused the old cable end to break off in the unit. 

 I am pretty handy and was wondering if there is any literature no how to rebuild the speedometer or if not, can you recommend a reputable rebuilder.  Thanks in advance for your help,

 Joe

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Joe,

 
Sounds as if your diagnosis is right on. 

 
I perform a lot of my own maintenance, however when it comes to instrumentation I leave that to the pros.  For this I've had good experience with "Clocks by Roger" in Chattanooga, TN. 

 
Maybe someone else can direct you to the technical information you need to rebuild your speedometer, but this is the route I'd pursue.

 
Brad


From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President: 

I hear what you are saying.  I too, also rebuilt my '58 speedometer and had the same problem.  I finally sent it to  Corvette Clocks by Roger and problem was solved. 24 Leisure Lane, Jackson, TN  38305 731/664/6120==731/644/1627fax.  Max Brockhouse, President SACC

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Joe,
 

Original speedometer cables didn't have plastic molded tips. I made the mistake of installing an aftermarket one a few years ago. It was too short, chattered & promply twisted the plastic end off. Your speedo cable should be 70 inches long with crimped ends on a steel cable and a black jacket. Try Paragon Reproduction P/N 1868 or Corvette Central P/N SKU 211401.
 

Make sure the cable is lubed properly & the ends are seated into both the speedometer head & the transmission driven gear.
 

Good luck with your project,
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.
 

Michigan Chapter SACC


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Joe:  Your Corvette's speedometer and tachometer are mechanical devices that indicate your car and your engine speed by a spinning cable that spins a bar magnet inside a metal cup, called the speed cup, that moves the pointer.  The cable has a square end on it that inserts into a square hole at the back of the speedometer (or tachometer) housing.  The input to the speedometer mechanism is a steel shaft about two inches long supported by two bronze (Oilite) bushings that are permanently lubricated.  The other end of this shaft attaches to the bar magnet.  Over time the lubricant dries out and can cause this shaft to bind in the two bushings, causing the cable to break.  Or the bushings can wear out causing the spinning magnet to come in physical contact with the speed cup and cause a "clanging" sound when the car is driven at speed.  If this is the case with you, continuing to drive the car can destroy the speed cup, and new parts are not available to repair it.  The speedometer shop will likely get the needed parts out of a used speedometer.  The steel shaft also has a worm gear cut on it that drives the odometer readout through a series of gears.

 
To determine what your problem is, disconnect the speedometer cable housing from the speedometer head.  There is a 1/8th inch part of the shaft exposed,  Grab it with your finger tips and to try to move it up and down and side to side.  If there is noticeable movement, then the bushings are worn out and you will have to remove the speedometer and have it rebuilt at a speedometer shop.  This problem normally does not cause binding that breaks the cable, so it is unlikely to be your problem.  Then take the broken off cable stub and insert into the shaft and try to spin it with your fingers.  If resistance is noted, then the bushings are dry and need to be re-lubricated.  You can do this yourself if you are handy, and you say you are.  While you are at it, check the tachometer the same way.

 
To re-lubricate the shaft, you will have to remove the speedometer from the car.  Using a 1/16 inch drill, drill a hole in the top of the die-cast zink housing about where the threads end.  This positions the hole about midway between the bushings.  Then use a hypodermic needle or some type of pointy oiler to inject a small amount of 30 weight engine oil into the housing through this hole.  Keep injecting until the shaft spins freely.  When the shaft spins freely, you are done with the oiling.  If removing the speedometer from the car is too much for you, you can drill the hole in the side of the housing in this location and pretty much achieve the same results.  There is not much room to work under the dash with the speedometer installed.
 
Check the results by spinning the shaft with a variable speed electric hand drill.  Make sure that the pointer goes up and down smoothly as the shaft speed is varied.  The speedometer is calibrated to indicate 60mph at 1001 rpm of the shaft speed.  The tachometer indicates twice shaft speed.  This is because the cable turns at half engine speed.

 
If you really feel up to it, remove the speedometer mechanism from the speedometer housing and oil or grease the odometer shafts and gears and everything else that moves.  Do not remove the die-cast housing containing the shaft and spinning magnet from the speedometer assembly.

 
I have used this method to re-lubricate many speedometers and tachometers, and it always works.

 
Larry Pearson

 

**********

Bruce,
On my '54 I'm having trouble finding a spare tire that will fit in the trunk well and allow the wood cover to full close. Any suggestions?   We have 205/75R15 Coker white walls on the corvette and they are about inch and half too fat.
 
Virgil


From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Virgil,
  Yes, your problem is real. I had bought (5) Coker bias-ply (Firestone) when I first restored my '54 in 2000  to keep it all original. They were terrible, egg shaped and would not balance.
I had to have them trued which took a lot of rubber off. They only lasted about 15k miles so I replaced with (4) Diamond-Back radials with W/W vulcanized on the outside. They are GREAT! Only problem is they are wider and will not fit un-restricted in the spare. So, I used one of the old Coker bias-ply as a spare and it just fits with no spare room. My suggestion is to try and swap with Coker and have them send you a bias-ply 670x15 and use as a spare. Or, you can live with the bulge in the trunk?
Cheers,
Bruce

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello:
 
My 1960 Corvette Grab Bar Bezels, are they Chrome Plated or are they Stainless Steel?

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

Dennis

 
The bezels on the ends of the grab bar are chrome plated.

 
Chip Werstein
 

 

 

 

 

**********

I wonder if I could get some assistance?    When I renewed my 2018 membership (SACC # 3987)  I had requested assistance and received a reply to send it to, Dr. Jack Hallada.   I am sending photos of an Ignition shield, that was in the trunk of my 1960 Corvette, which I purchased in 1968.  This shield as you can see by the photo's is steel, chrome plated with sharp corners.  I have gone thru a lot of manuals and have not been able to match it up?   The correct shape was stamped, rounded corners and I believe made of Stainless Steel.

        One friend, a Retired GM Service manager, though that it may have been an early proto type, he said he had seen, a lot of hand made items from GM over the years, on the early corvettes. Then again? It could be a piece someone made?

      I've emailed copies to Paragon Corvette, No one can give me any information either.

      I am in final stages of putting the "Vette" back on the road, As a kid I beat the heck out of it!  But I saved all the old original parts.  It will never be a concourse car, but! "I love to drive it!" and it looks great!

         Can anyone identify this Ignition Shield? What years (s).  Does it have any value?

      Any assistance would be appreciated!

 

Thank you!

 

Clifford


 

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  This shield appears to be from a 58-61 carbureted Corvette which mounted the ignition coil on the passenger side.  Fuel injected Corvettes mounted the coil on the driver’s side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Cliff:  If this isn't some sort of a prototype, then someone went to a lot of trouble and expense to create a top radio shield for the carbureted engines that could have been purchased at any Chevrolet parts counter.  I was able to buy this top shield from my dealer well into the 70's.  This top shield design was used on 1957 through 1962 radio equipped carbureted Corvettes. Fuel injection equipped Corvettes had a much different looking top shield because of a different coil location.   I don't know what the 1956 top shield looked like, but it was probably something like this unless it was some kind of carry-over from 1955.  The original top shield for these years was made out of three separate pieces of polished stainless steel that were spot welded together to form the finished part. Your shield dates back to before 1968 when you got it with your 1960 Corvette.  It appears to be made up of at least five separate pieces that were welded together and then chrome plated.
  
The original shields were normally mounted to the engine with two chrome plated wing bolts in the back and a chrome plated 1/4-20 hex head bolt on the top.  The shield attaches to spark plug wire support brackets in three different locations.  The back side had two slotted cutouts like the one shown in your photo. on the left side of your shield.  Some shields had a slot on one side and a round hole on the other side.  The one on my 1960 was done this way.  The right side of your shield has a big cutout that would not work with the wing nut, because it is too large.  Finally, there should be an oblong hole on the top surface for the hex bolt to go.  You have no hole there at all.  So the way your shield is configured it is beautiful, but it is not usable as a top radio shield.

 
What is it worth?  Unless you can prove that GM made it as a prototype, I don't think that anyone would want it.  Reproductions of the real thing are readily available.

 
Larry Pearson

 

********

My name is Dennis DeVito. I am currently in the final stages of my 1960 Corvette's Restoration Project.
My question is on the proper location of the Jacking Instructions Decal and the Positraction Decal on the Sparetire Coverboard.
I also have a Harrison Aluminum Top Tank Radiator, and would like the Factory Correct location of the Thermostat Decal's exact location on the which side of the top of the Radiator.
Please respond.

 

Thank You
Dennis

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dennis:  Original top tank aluminum radiators are very rare, and I have never seen one with the paper "CAUTION" sticker in place.  On the 1961 and 1962 aluminum radiators that use the separate aluminum expansion tank, the sticker is on the left (driver's) side and the Harrison metal tag is on the right side.  The CAUTION sticker on your radiator should go on the opposite side from the Harrison tag, probably the left side.  The location of this sticker is not "exact", and there is no location specification in the factory Assembly Manual.  As a point of interest, this same "CAUTION" sticker was also used on the 1960 Chevy sedans, but it was applied to the steel header in front of the radiator, and not on the radiator.

 
The red Positraction paper label goes on the left (driver's) side of the plywood spare tire cover and the black jacking instructions go on the right side.  They are glued in place with a yellow rubber cement type adhesive (like 3M weatherstrip adhesive in the spray can) that was sprayed on the wood (with lots of overspray) and then the paper labels were applied over the adhesive.  Both labels are approximately centered between the edge of the board and the center metal cover hold down cup, and are approximately in line with the metal hold down cup.  Nothing precise here.
 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Bruce,

I have a quick question for you. I am replacing the radiator hoses on
our 1954 Corvette. I'm looking to find out the correct hose clamps. Are
they spring clamps or tower clamps?

Also, what are your thoughts about converting to a 12 volt system?


Thanks,

Virgil

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi again,  
    I researched your request for hose clamps at home and this is what I found.
Two different clamps were used on early and late '54's. They are a flat metal strap about a 1/2" wide. and it is bent outward about 90 degrees. A small machine bolt fits through the holes to form the clamp. The second clamp is still a 1/2"  but it's center section has been stamped out of and doubled around to form a center reinforcement. This type is shown on the attached photo which was taken at Barrett/Jackson in Scottsdale this weekend of an original '54 un-restored VIN # 1289 (early production). Disregard the overflow tank small hose clamps which are Corbin spring clamps which were not used until 1955.
Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Virgil,
  The conversion to 12 V is easy, I did it to mine about 20 years ago. The 6v wire is larger so no problem there. Change the bulbs (all) including the dash and doors., the clock if working to quartz, and the starter and generator need to be rewound for 12V and keep the same housings. The float in the gas tank needs to be changed, the voltage regulator and most important add a resistor (porcelain) to the ign. line to the points. Obviously the coil to 12V. The major expense is the conversion of the radio to 12V. You will need to send to a radio guy to replace all tubes, I paid $400. I did not replace the horns since they were over $750 and when I use the horn, close your ears! I found a 12V DELCO battery that was sealed and glued 3 yellow tops on the top with the threads cut off.
Cheers,
Bruce Fuhrman  

 

 

 
Cheers,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

**********

Looking for Diagrams/Schematics for the Trunk Latch “fiberglass piece”  that is Bonded to the trunk Floor, with the Latch…
Also other parts like the  License plate Lamp/housing,  and,, or course a TRUNK LID….
Any info would be appreciated,  AND,  who may have some For Sale….
Thank you
Sam


 

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 
Sam:  It sounds like your car got rear-ended.  You should be able to buy everything you need from Corvette Central.  They have an online catalogue at www.corvettecentral.com, or you can call them at 800.345.3342.  I have a hard copy of their catalog from 2010, and all your needs seem to be there, and I assume that they still are.  Another good source is Paragon Reproductions, Inc., 800.882.4688, www.corvette-paragon.com.  This is from their 2004 catalog.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Looking for help identifying the block drains for cooling system flush
on my 1959 283.  Pics attached.  Which are the drain plugs - front or
back?  Also, any tips on accessing the lower radiator hose which seems
to require removal of the fan cowling.

Thanks!

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Clark:  The coolant drain plugs are the 9/16 inch steel plugs located in the middle of both sides of the engine block. You need to remove the plugs on both sides of the block and open the lower radiator drain petcock to completely drain the engine block.  I do not know what the front plugs on your block are for, and do not recall ever seeing these plugs on any of the small block Chevys that I own.  I own the following original engine Chevys:  1956 265ci, 1960 283ci, 1962 327ci, 1975 350 ci, and 1992 350 ci.  Your block does not look like any 283 ci block that I have ever seen.  But if it works, enjoy.  Neat looking oil pan!  The original oil pan on your Corvette was a high capacity steel 5 quart pan (6 quart oil change including the filter).  Even on the base engines.  The passenger cars had 4 quart oil pans, with a 5 quart oil change.

 
As far as the lower radiator hose, you have to remove the upper and lower fan shrouds to get at the front lower hose clamp.  There is an access hole in the right front side of the lower fan shroud but I have never been able to properly access the front lower hose clamp through that hole.  You can't get to this clamp from under the car because the frame cross member is in the way.  Use a good quality replacement lower hose and it will last you many years.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

Gentlemen:
 
Does anyone have detailed specifications/dimensions on ’61-’62 seats.  I finally pulled my ’61 from the upholstery shop where they had it for 4 months and it is still not completed.  They refurbished my seat frames added new foam and recovered them.  Seats look great but they do not fit properly.  Obviously they are “over-stuffed” for proper seating position and convertible frame clearance (when top is down).  I am fighting with them on fix but it would be great if I had detailed measurements and clearances.  Any help is much appreciated.
 


From: Larry Pearson,, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Gary:  There are no "measurements" published anywhere. The seat assemblies were constructed and upholstered in a separate facility and delivered to the assembly line ready to install in the car. No photographs exist showing the upholstery workers assembling the seats.  Al Knoch Interiors has produced a video showing how to install his seat covers over his seat foam and these videos cost about $100 each.  Maybe you could start with this.  Did you buy new seat foam from Al Knoch to install over the refurbished seat frame?  Back in 1961 Motor Trend did a road test on the 1961 Corvette and it shows how the seats looked and fit when the car was new.  The original seat foam was molded out of latex foam rubber which deteriorates when exposed to air over a period of time.  Did your upholstery shop add modern plastic foam rubber cut from a sheet over the original latex foam making the seat too wide to fit in the car?  The center pleated insert originally had a distinct depression in it.  Most upholstery shops over-stuff this area making it appear convex rather than concave.  But it should still fit in the car.  The seats should be narrow enough that the seat can be moved back and forth the entire range of the seat track without "jamming" against the center console.  If it jams against the center console, maybe you could remove the "hog rings" that attach the seat cover to the frame in that area and remove the excess foam rubber and then reinstall the hog rings (they can be re-shaped and re used).

 
You say that the seats "look great".  That's a good start.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

**********

 

I recently lost the motor in my 58 283 Fuelie (rod thru the oil pan) after only 450 miles on a rebuild from a machine shop. I will be replacing it  with a GM 350 290hp long block using 462 camel hump heads to raise the compression and  to keep some what of an original look. My question is since the new blocks do not have a road draft tube can I get away with using a vented oil breather cap on the oil fill tube to vent the engine? The Fuel Injection unit should work on that motor with that cam but I would rather not have to put a pvc or breather on the valve covers to keep a stock look. What affect will this have on the motor? I do not want to put a used rebuilt motor in the car again.

 

Thanks,

member #2034

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,

 

Your original engine block had a provision for a road draft tube to draw clean air through the oil filler cap although only hydraulic cam engines had this type of oil filler cap. Solid lifter engines did not have an oil filler cap that would breath fresh air into the crankcase.  In order for your replacement engine to vent itself you would need to add a PCV valve somewhere on one of the valve covers which would require some modification along with an oil filler cap that would permit fresh air into the engine.  These oil filler breather caps are available from various after market Corvette parts suppliers. In order to preserve the original look of your valve covers would require extensive modifications of the replacement engine block to provide a PCV valve that first appeared in 1961/1962 RPO 242 PCV valve applications. After market engine blocks that do not have the road draft tube provision are a crap shoot but can be made to work if you are willing to modify and add a PCV valve to one of your original valve covers.

 

 

**********


 
I’M LOOKING FOR A REPLACEMENT 6” X 9”SPEAKER THAT WILL FIT MY 62. THE PROBLEM I’M HAVING IS THAT THE 4 STUDS ON THE DASH HOLD DOWN ARE NOT LONG ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE THE AFTERMARKET SPEAKERS THAT ARE ABOUT ½” THICK AT THE MOUNTING FLANGE AND THERE IS NOT ENOUGH LENGTH ON THE 4 STUDS TO GET THE NUTS ON. I ASSUME THE OEM UNITS WERE CLOSE TO FLUSH THUS PROVIDING ENOUGH LENGTH TO SECURE THE HOLD DOWN NUTS. I SEE AFTERMARKET SMALL DUAL SPEAKERS MOUNTED TO A 6” X 9” PLATE BUT I’M NOT SURE HOW THICK THAT PLATE IS OR IF IT WILL WORK WITH MY STOCK HOLD DOWN STUD LENGTH. ANY HELP WOULD BE APPRECIATED.
BILL
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Bill:  Chip Werstein offered some good suggestions, and I have some additional thoughts.

 
Do you have the original speaker?  If so, use a razor blade and trim the thickness of the cardboard seal to match the thickness of the original speaker cone.  The 1/2" thickness that you report is way too thick.  If you have the original speaker and the cone is torn with no missing pieces, it can usually be repaired using Elmer's white glue and toilet paper.  Yes, toilet paper.  It works great.  If you want it to look black, use a black felt tip pen to blacken it.  Or as chip suggested, look for someone to re-cone it.  Whatever speaker you end up using, the original transformer must be used or the radio output transistor will immediately burn out if you connect the radio output directly to the speaker voice coil.  The radio output transistor is directly connected the transformer primary coil, which is part of its bias circuit, and the four ohm resistance of the voice coil is much too low.

 
I do not recommend dual-cone speakers.  That only complicates things from an impedance standpoint and may destroy the radio output transistor or cause the output to distort.

 
Larry Pearson

 


 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Bill,

 
I have installed many speakers in C-1 Corvettes and never experienced this problem. I would check 3 things.

 
1. Are the 4 studs on your speaker grill oval broken or somehow too short?

 
2. Is there excess foam on the dash pad which prevents the oval from going down as far as it should?

 
3. Did you slot ( or make oval) the stud holes for the speaker grill oval? If you didn't, the vinyl on the pad will hold the oval up too high.

 
Perhaps you could take an original speaker and have it re-coned.

 
Chip Werstein


 

**********

Am rebuilding 1960 and cannot find the castle nut that holds pinion yoke
onto the pinion shaft.  Tried buying a 7/8" fine thread nut at machine
shop, but the threads seemed too coarse. Anybody no what the nut size is
(thread count) and where I can get one?

Thanks,

Tom

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

Tom:  Corvette Central has this nut under catalog number 582107 and comes with a new washer.  It actually is a locking nut and you are supposed to use a new nut and washer every time you remove it.  The nut is pinched to make it resistant to coming loose.  According to the ST-12 shop manual, page 4-10, the nut is to be torqued to 150-190 foot-pounds.  I suggest that you use a large pipe wrench to hold the "pinion yoke" from turning while torqueing the nut..  Originally they had a special tool to hold it and this tool is shown on page 4-10.  It would be easiest if you tightened the nut with the differential installed in the rear axle housing.  The pipe wrench can then rest against the garage floor.  I suggest that you install a new pinion seal, because it can leak, and then you can do the whole job over again.

 
Larry Pearson. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

NCRS Member number 63986, not a member of SACC yet.

I have a 1962 Corvette Survivor, 327 CI engine, 250 HP, 4 speed transmission.  Car was running find up to a couple of days ago.  Battery charged, fuel in car, when you crank it, turns over, but nothing happens, will not start.

There is a brown wire loose under the dash, might be from the ignition switch, however, I have a colostomy and am not able to look under the dash.  Going to get this bag off my side November 3, 2017.

Everything is the same on car, most likely something simple but??????

Any suggestions or comments welcomed.

Thank you, Steve


 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Steve:  The 18 gauge brown wire loose under the dash is most likely the problem.  This wire goes from the lower part of the center connector on the ignition switch and the other end goes to the ballast resistor under the hood.  The brown wire from the windshield wiper motor also connects to the same lug on the ballast resistor.  The brown wire at the ignition switch locks into the plastic connector and is retained by a tab that is bent slightly up on the crimped-on connector.  This is one of three wires that go into this connector.  Make sure that the brown wire connector locks into the plastic connector, or this problem might repeat itself.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 
I have a 1959 Corvette with a single Carter 4 barrel WCFB on the 283.  I have the passenger side exhaust manifold casting # 3750556 that has the hole for the inner choke tube, but no choke tube.  The casting does not have an exit hole bored through at the base opposing to top hole.  I am confused, I see there is a lower choke tube that can be purchase, but if I press it in and attache the upper tube to it, then the Carter choke would be directly connected to the heat and pressure of the exhaust gasses - this doesn't seem correct to me.  Am I missing something?  Is the choke tube that is pressed into the manifold open at the other end in the exhaust allowing the pressurized gas to flow to the choke body?
 
Any description or diagrams would help.  I've searched on the internet and read vague discussions, but I am perplexed by this.

 

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dane:  All  Chevrolet V-8 engines starting in 1955 with a carburetor had what is known as a heat stove in the passenger exhaust manifold.  The purpose of the heat stove is to heat up the ambient air being drawn into the automatic choke housing by a manifold vacuum passage inside the carburetor.  This heated air causes a bi-metallic coil inside the choke housing to heat up and twist open the automatic choke valve inside the carburetor air horn and, through linkage, turn a fast idle cam on the base of the carburetor to slow the cold fast idle.

 
Starting in 1957 the heat stove consists of an approximately 6-inch stainless steel hollow tube that is pressed into this exhaust manifold through holes bored in the top and bottom side of the manifold at an angle and in perfect alignment.  Your exhaust manifold must have both of these holes.  They never made an exhaust manifold with just the top hole, as you seem to be telling us. If your manifold is defective, you will have to buy a replacement manifold with a good tube in it.  Or try your luck in drilling the lower hole in alignment with the upper hole.  Or plug the holes and use an after market electric choke housing.  The solid axle fuel injected engines had manifolds without the heat stove.  These manifolds without the heat stove are very rare and valuable.  The cast-in part numbers are the same for both manifolds.

 
Sometimes the tube burns through and the tube must be replaced.  You don't want hot exhaust gasses being drawn into the choke housing.  Replacement tubes are available through Corvette Central.  Be careful if you are drilling out the remains of a burned out tube that you do not enlarge the holes in the cast iron manifold or the replacement tube will not stay in place.  Use a pin punch to drive out the old tube remains.  The upper end of  heat stove connects to the carburetor choke housing with a length of 1/4 brake line and a compression ferrule and special brass hex nut.  The lower end of the stove tube is open to ambient air.  In 1962 a special lower tube assembly connected into the lower end and came up and transitioned to a rubber hose that pushed over a brass tube in the side of the carburetor air horn, thereby causing filtered air to enter the choke housing.

 
Larry Pearson

 


 


 

**********

hi,   i have a 62 corvette and the tach only goes up to about 12 to 1500 rpms, i have checked the cable connections and all seems fine.     any thoughts besides replacing the tach  ?
i really do not want to pull out the cluster  !!       thanks in advance for any thoughts            charles
 

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The tachometer in your Corvette operates on a bunch of spinning magnets that register RPM.  Your tachometer is history and needs to be rebuilt by a reputable rebuilder.  On the West Coast many people rely on Valley Vettes, Mike Poirer in San Diego, 619-461-1952.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I have some additional thoughts on this.  The solid axle tachometer operates just like the solid axle speedometer, except that it indicates twice shaft speed.  A spinning magnet assembly driven off the tachometer (or speedometer) cable operates inside an aluminum cup called the speed cup and causes the cup, which attaches to a shaft that the pointer is on, to turn against a coil spring.  The unit is calibrated by charging or discharging the magnetism in the tips of the spinning magnet assembly. The problem usually is with wear in the bushings that support the spinning magnet assembly.  Or the problem can be with the speed cup shaft bushings. Or both.  Because of this, you should contact a local speedometer shop that can repair old mechanical speedometers to get it rebuilt.  Corvette Central offers a repair service for solid axle speedometers and tachometers, and they can do the repair for you no matter where you live.  It is hard to find parts for these early units and a local shop might not be able to repair your unit.  If you have a local shop rebuild it, be sure to tell them to calibrate it to read twice shaft speed!

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 



 

**********

Hi, Can you guys help me with some information on the correct speed nuts for a set of 58 trunk spears? I have looked almost everywhere but I cant find anyone that knows. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks for you time,.............E McIntosh
 

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter advisor: 

The 58 trunk spears are retained by PAL nuts, not speed nuts.  The PAL nut is a self tapping hex headed sheet metal formed nut that cuts its own threads on the trunk spear studs and they have "PAL" stamped on the flange area.  They come in various sizes depending on the size of the stud they are being threaded on.  I think that you need a 1/8th inch size.  The inside cavity of these nuts were filled with grey 3M Strip Caulk to prevent water leakage into the trunk.  Contact Corvette Central to see if they sell them.  If not, contact me and I will send you some at no charge.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I AM A NEW MEMBER # 3993 AND HAVE A FEW TECHNICAL QUESTIONS MAYBE SOMEONE CAN HELP ME WITH.
 
1)      MY FACTOR HUBCAPS SEAM TO BE TURNING ON THE RIMS AND STARTING TO PINCH THE AIR STEMS. THE RIMS HAVE 4-BUMP-OUTS TO HOLD THE HUBCAPS BUT THEY STILL TRY TO ROTATE FOR SOME REASON.
2)       I CURRENTLY HAVE AN OLD AM/FM-CASSETE PLAYER (WONDERBAR IN STORAGE) BUT THIS RADIO IS SHOT. I AM LOOKING FOR A REPLACEMENT AND THERE SEEM TO BE MANY OUT THERE. HOWEVER MOST ARE HIGH-TECH WITH ELECTRONIC PRESETS ETC. I DISCONNECT MY BATTERY EVERY TIME AND DON’T WANT TO DEAL WITH FLASHING LIGHTS AND HAVING TO RE-SET RADIO STATIONS ETC. DO YOU KNOW OF A UNIT THAT COULD WORK FOR ME?
THANKS FOR YOUR TIME!
BILL

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advsor: 

Bill,

 

 
Don't know what the problem could be with your hubcaps..................unless they are reproductions and not originals. I have heard that repros can fall off.

 
I have 2 reproduction am-fm stereo wonderbar with radios with inputs. They work great and keep their settings when the battery is disconnected. Contact Len Marino 626-358-1466 to purchase one.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 
   I have, ready to install, in my (late off the line) 1954 Corvette,
a battery tray with 2 diagonal bars extending out.
 
   The worn out battery tray in the car is the flat type.
 
   How is it best installed?
 
   Are both types of trays acceptable for a '54?
 
   Also, have you found an aceptable tie-down
for an Optima Red Top battery?
 
Please advise.
 
Thank you,
Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Bob,
    To my knowledge there was only one type battery tray used in the '54. The 2 diagonal bars straddle the frame and are attached with bolts to the frame (see photo), I also included a top view. 
   I do not have any info on the Optima Red battery installation, but be creative!
   You can access info on membership in SACC on our web site, www.solidaxle.org  .
Cheers,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Should my powerglide transmission on my 1960 Corvette start in "both" neutral and park or in "either" neutral or park. It presently will only start in park. Thanks, Wayne

 

From: Joe LeMay, SoCal Chapter: 

The Performance Verification for C1s says the car starts in both park and neutral.
 
Joe

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1962. My question is about the tach gauge. There is a low RPM and a High RPM gauge. Are these tach gauges related to the HP? What determines if a low or high is correct for my car?

Best regards / Mit freundlichen Grüssen / un saludo /
诚挚问

Ron

From Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

RPM red line is directly related to engine horsepower.  The 250 and 300 horsepower cars are equipped with a hydraulic camshafts and use the low RPM red line tachometer.  The 340 and 360 horsepower engines had solid lifter camshafts and came with the high RPM red line tachometer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I recently saw a C1 vette with cove moldings and inserts like a 61 but the driver told me it was a 62 vette. Was the trim an option or could it have been added to the 62 by the owner? Thanks

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  Stainless cove separation trim was not available, from the factory on a 62 Corvette.  Of course, once it left the factory, the owner could have done what they wanted...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Only added to the car by an owner as GM did very few COPO cars in the day as only the very high ups in the corporate ladder could get a one off special Corvette from St. Louis. Maybe the owner was clueless as to what year he had!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Jeff:  The 1962 had a raised bead instead of stainless steel moldings like 1956-1961 Corvettes had.  It would be very hard to mount the 1961 moldings over this raised bead and have the result look good.  The raised bead cannot be ground smooth without the certainty of going completely through the fiberglass in the areas of the raised bead.  If this car really was a 1962, I suspect that the front fiberglass and door fiberglass was replaced with 1961 panels.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Trying to install antenna cable that runs inside the rocker , what the best way to get the cable from the trunk to the dash? Thanks
 

From: Bruce Fuhrman. SACC Secretary:  The method of placing the cable is not available in any books I have, however is easy to place under the carpet and behind the seat.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Lucio:  There is a 1953-1955 Corvette Assembly Instruction Manual (AIM) that is available through NCRS or the major Corvette parts suppliers, and you should obtain a copy if you have one of these cars.  This publication was prepared by Chevrolet engineering to instruct the assembly line in how to build the car.  This publication is all drawn by freehand, and there are no page numbers, but I think that you will find it to be very helpful.  The antenna lead was run through the rocker panel on the passenger side, along with the main wiring harness.  Apparently when the body was being constructed a pull wire was included to assist in the installation of the main wiring harness and the radio antenna cable.  Running the cable under the carpet would be the easiest approach, but this is not how the factory did it, as you will see when you get your AIM.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

My question is I would like to know detail specifications on the 1958 convertible top weather stripping,fastening for it,screw type and size of all retainers,and procedures for adjusting the top to the body and the windshield Thanks

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

For help understanding the 1958 Corvette Convertible top mechanism and installation, you need to refer to the official Chevrolet Shop Manual for all C1 Corvettes, Corvette Servicing Guide, Publication ST-12.  This publication can be obtained from most of the Corvette Parts Suppliers, and is a “must have” for C1 owners.  The information you need is found in Section 1, BODY, pages 1-31 through 1-34.  It is not complete, and I do not know any source to go to for all the small details.  These tops are not easy to install and I suggest that you go to an experienced upholstery shop to have the work done.  It is virtually impossible using words to explain how to install one of these tops.  Al Knoch sells videos that teach you how to install these tops.  He also offers a top installation service at Meets he attends.  Corvette Central sells all the weatherstripping and hardware you will need, and their catalog illustrations will help you figure out what you need and where it goes.

 

The original weather stripping used on the 1956 through 1958 Corvettes was cloth covered with molded in mounting studs and steel reinforcements, and has been discontinued since 1959.  You have to use the 1959 through 1962 style weather stripping and attaching hardware illustrated in figure 79 on page 1-74.  Each of the six rubber weather strips on the side frames are attached using black-painted steel retainer strips and #8-32 round-head Phillips screws and special weld nuts as shown in figure 79.  There is also a header weather stripping that installs with its own metal retainer and special screws and the rear deck bow weather strip, which is not illustrated.  The header and rear deck bow weatherstrips don’t get installed until after the top fabric is installed to them.  The rear deck bow weather strip attaches with screws and staples.  There are also two (left and right) short weatherstrips that bridge the gap between the top frame and the rear deck bow.  These attach with screws and 3M weatherstrip adhesive, and are installed after the top fabric is in place.

 

Before attempting to install the top frame, every part of it must be painted and properly shaped (not bent).  The frame parts are painted semigloss black and the header is gloss black.  There are tacking strips (also called trim sticks) in the header, rear window bow and deck lid bow which must be in serviceable condition before the top fabric can be installed.  Tacking strips are petroleum impregnated (to make them waterproof) heavy cardboard strips that accept staples or tacks to hold the top fabric to these bows.  They usually need replacing or repair.  All pivot points must be lubricated with grease or 30w oil so they move freely.

 

To install the top frame to the car body, first install the side weatherstrips to the top frame using the metal retainers and special weld nuts on the inside, as shown in Figure 79.  Install the top frame to the car body a using the hardware shown in Figure 71 and adjust the frame up and down and back and forth until it fits the side windows perfectly when the windows are all the way up.  The side frames attach to the front header using slotted holes to assist in making the adjustments.  The door window stops must be properly adjusted so that the side windows go up the proper amount.  Not too high or too low.  If you have a hard top, use that to adjust the window stops so that the side windows go up the proper amount.  The linkage that goes up to the center pivot point on the side frames us used to raise the pivot point so it follows the shape of the side window frames.  That is all it does.  Do not proceed with the top fabric installation until the top frame fits the side windows as perfectly as possible.  Things will only get worse once the top fabric is installed.

 

I hope this information gets you moving in the right direction.  Get the Al Knoch video if you want to attempt to do the top installation yourself.

 

Larry Pearson

 

**********

1960 vette, rear leaf spring. I am replacing both. the front shackle, is that large bolt pressed in, it's threaded on one end only. how do you get that out of the schackle, hammer??

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advsor: 

Charlie,


 
The head of the shackle bolt is serrated so it won't spin in the bracket when you tighten the nut. In many cases it is rusted into the bracket. You probably can remove it with heat but the bracket and bolt my not be reusable. Worst case scenario.....use a cutting torch to cut the bolt out of the bracket. Both parts are available new from Paragon or Corvette Central. Note, I suspect it goes without saying that the spring assemble with front bracket attached must be removed from the chassis in order to drive the bolt out.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

Hello SACC Tech

        Im not a member,thought I would still ask.

I have a new press molded jig built front end for 62 corvette,I asked the Corvette Image this a.m  they do not drill because not everyone wants them.

The holes for top fender S.S were not drilled,which has not been to hard to do.  But the hard part ! has been the CORVETTE script and emblem above.

 Is there a Reliable template out there ?  This is difficult to do straight at correct location.  Help, car is in paint shop now.

Thanks

walt
 

From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Walt,
 
This is a common problem when replacing original body panels.
Make your own template using stiff paper to locate the holes on your original panels, then transfer to the new panel.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1958 fuel injected 250 HP corvette, that has been rebuilt from the ground up. We are having difficulty with the full injection unit. It has been rebuilt by known specialists (!) , It stars cold easily but when it warm up it stalls and won’t start.? Where do we start?? Thanks Ken B in Vancouver
 

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Well join the crowd with FI cars that won't/don't run in the heat.  The problem is todays 10% gasohol gasoline which boils and then percolates at 40 degrees less than pre gasohol fuel did.  The copper spider lines of FI cars are excellent of transferring engine heat and causing the fuel to percolate.  If under hood engine temperatures reach or exceed 180 degrees you will consistently have this problem and there are no known easy cures. Not sure if Canada has gasohol but I am sure it does as this problem is rampant in the Southwestern United States.  Racing fuel is an option but is crazy expensive and in California is illegal to use on surface streets and highways.  I tell my customers to just "park it" if the ambient outside temperature exceeds 90 degrees as there is no solution to this problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I need to know the tan paint color/code for the top bows on my 55 Vette.
I,m closing in on finishing the restoration this is one of the few item left to do.
Thanks.
Larry
 

From:  Bruce Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

There are no codes available in any of my books for the '53-'55 metal bows for the top. I was able to match the color perfectly by selecting several Beige spray cans from my local hardware store and checking the lids to the existing bow.
Good luck.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

**********

Hello, , Just rebuilt the steering box on my '62 C1. . That was easy enough with the Joe Calcagno instructions. .
. . Question is, The spring in the drag link suggests it should be tighter than just zero clearance. . What is the correct "tightness" ? ?

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advsor: 

Consult you ST 12 Corvette shop manual......page 9-3.


 
"Tighten plugs snugly to remove all end play of ball. Back off plugs 1/4 to 1/2 turn plus amount necessary to insert cotter pin."

 

 

 

 

 


 
Chip Werstein
 

 

 

**********

1962, is the license plate bracket, bumper reinforcement, painted black or body color? Thanks for your help.. Rear bumper 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Semi gloss black

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi:

 
I have one more question that you probably know the answer to.  If I have the ignition on, without the engine running, the ballast resistor gets extremely hot.  Hot enough to melt the insulation on the wires attached to it.  Is this normal?  I know that without the points opening and closing, the current through it is constant but should it get that hot?  No caution to not have the ignition on without the engine running in the owner's manual.

 
Thanks,
Chuck

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Chuck:  If you leave the ignition on with the engine not running and the points in the distributor happen to be closed, and you leave the ignition on for some period of tine, both the ballast resistor and the coil will get very hot, and you will discharge the battery.  This could be damaging to both of them, and you should avoid doing this.  I have not heard of the resistor getting so hot that the insulation melts on the connecting wires.  If you are running some kind of test and you want to leave the ignition on, "bump" the starter until the points are open, as evidenced by a low ammeter discharge reading.

 
If you are using an original "091" coil (these numbers are embossed on the side of the coil), you are supposed to use a ballast resistor of 0.5 ohms (marked with a black dot on the metal bracket).  If you are using a service replacement "202" coil, you should be using a 1.5 ohm ballast resistor (marked with a blue stripe).  If you are using an after market coil, I would play it safe and use a 1.5 ohm resistor, which should not cause so much heating.   

     

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

I can't figure out how the clips go for the chrome on the glove box, 1956 Corvette.
-William

From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter Advisor: 

The aluminum trim clips (Part # 14818) for the Glove Box Door are round on two opposite corners and square on the other two corners

with an interference threaded hole in the middle. It takes four clips. You insert two clips inside the back channel
of each door stainless trim pieces with the narrow sides parallel to the edges. Then rotate the clip 90 degrees clockwise
until it is seated under the lip edges of the trim piece. (The top of the trim strip must be held toward the upward
position and the clip must be rotated clockwise to keep from unseating the clip when the attaching screw is tightened) 
The clips should be located to line up with the holes in the glove box door. Then attach using a #10-24 screw with a washer head

 
The 2 Short trim pieces below glove box door are put on by attaching  NSS Clips to the outside of each side of the
glove box compartment (separator) (with the friction clip toward the sides) using the 10-24  hinge-mounting bolts 
with counter-sunk head. Then put washer & nut on inside of glove box. The bottom stainless trim pieces can then be slid
 onto the clips since they have an open bottom end 

 
The 2 top stainless trim pieces must be snapped onto  2 NSS clips on each side that are mounted directly to the fiberglass with sheet metal type screws  (with the friction clip toward the sides), These pieces are closed on both ends making it necessary for you to 
snap them onto the clips.

 
Bill Preston

 

**********

need some help locating choke connector rods for my 54. 115-221 is part number in old tech manuals. also my wiper motor is original and needs rebuilt, is there a kit to do this, or someone who rebuilds.

Thanks very much,

Mike

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Mike,
   I assume you are referring to the rod that connects the mechanical movement from the cable to the choke plate at the bottom of the carburetor. These may be difficult to find. Check www.vettegal.com she has a lot of carburetor parts and just have some laying around.
Good luck.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,


 
Your wiper motor can be restored by Valley Vettes in San Diego.......Mike Poirier. He does instruments too. I have used him for many years. 619-461-1952.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

I need more help?

Again I have Two 1962 Corvette .

One has steering column About 47 inches long.

The other column 45 inches long.

Can you please tell me witch one is correct?

THANK YOU

Sthua

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Sthua,


 
I just measured a 1957 steering column I have out of the car. Measuring the mast jacket from the steering box is 49". The shaft extends approx 21/2 " past the end of the mast jacket. I don't know the actual length of a 58 to 62 column, but I know for certain it is shorter, probably by about 3".

 
Chip Werstein

 


 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 
 

Sthua,
You have two 1962 Corvettes with different length steering columns.
The original one should have the VIN plate resistance welded to the top surface of the tube just forward of the cowl, under the hood. The VIN #  should also match your vehicle title Vin Number.
I'm guessing that the longer one is in the car with the shifted transmission and the distorted front motor support bracket.
Wrecked cars can get strange parts.
Your 1962 assembly manual should show the correct GM steering gear asm P/N.
 
Regards,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

What is the best way to adjust the steering box on a 1959 corvette it has to much play in steering wheel thanks for any help
 New member Richard

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Richard,
 
The steering gear adjustment is a slotted screw & jam nut on the left side of the gearbox.
Loosen the jam nut and turn the adjustment screw in or out till you achieve minimum free play then retighten the jam nut.
In order to make adjustment easier on my C-1s, I drilled a 1/2 inch hole in the left side inner fender in line with the adjustment screw.
However, a 58 year old steering gear set may well have extremely worn/flatted/brinnelled gears and may require rebuild.
 
In addition, there are several other components that affect steering freeplay which need to be checked.
Loose wheel bearings, loose/worn kingpins, worn/loose drag link, loose third arm bearing asm & loose tie-rod ends all contribute to freeplay in the steering wheel.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

Will a 61 speedometer fit a 58 Corvette

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

The 61 speedo will bolt right in to the 58 but I think numbers on the face and the pointer are slightly different. 


 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 


**********

I have a 62 Corvette, 300 HP with a Carter AFB.  My question is about a sticking choke.  The choke opens fine as the car heats up.  The problem is that the choke sticks open.  After the engine is cold and I tap the accelerator, the choke won't slam shut.  I always have to take the top off the air cleaner and push the butterfly closed while I hold open the accelerator.  I've checked everything and it seems to be that the metal piston inside the choke housing binds in the cylinder.  I've tried everything from silicone spray to emery paper but nothing seems to fix it.  I could buy a new choke but I'd rather fix it and save money.
Thanks,
Chuck
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I am experiencing a similar problem on my 62 340 hp car. All parts and linkage operate freely, but when cold the choke wont close and as a result the fast idle won't set either. Purely by accident, I left the three screws which hold the choke cover to the housing somewhat loose and the choke  began to work perfectly. I am now trying to find the right "tightness" for those screws. I may attempt to put a 2nd gasket between the choke cover and housing. My problem isn't solved yet, but I think I'm getting close. 


 
Chip Werstein  

 

 

 

 

**********

I have mufflers and exhaust pipes bought in early 70’s for my “60” and never used. The pipes have the tags and the mufflers are still in the boxes. I’m going to put them up for sale but would like to verify the numbers. I have searched on line and can’t find any listing for parts this old.
Is there someone I can contact or do you have this information.
 
         Part Numbers are:   3752558
                                             3752555
                                              3735167
                                              3735164
                                              3815511
                                              3815512           Thanks, Charlie B.
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Charlie:  The exhaust system you have was for the base engines (230hp & 245hp)  and uses the oval muffler.  Each side of your dual exhaust system was serviced with five separate parts, listed from the engine to the rear bumper outlets:  exhaust pipe, extension pipe (adapts muffler to the exhaust pipe, about 2' long), oval muffler, tail pipe, and tail pipe extension (about 19" long and adapts the tail pipe to the bumper opening).  Originally the mufflers were manufactured with the extension pipe made as part of the muffler, but the mufflers were serviced without this extension, so a separate part was needed to connect the exhaust pipe to the muffler.  Here is how the part numbers apply:
Exhaust pipe:  3735167 (L.H.), 3735164 (R.H.);  Extension pipes: 3815513 (L.H.), 385514 (R.H.);  Mufflers:  3815511 (L.H.), 3815512  (R.H.);  Tail pipe:  3752555 (L.H.), 3752556 (R.H.);  Tail pipe extension:  3762440 (L.H. & R.H.).  The tail pipes and tail pipe extensions were the same for all engines.  Also, if you are using the oval mufflers with the solid lifter engines, the extension pipes and the oval mufflers would work on those applications.  The exhaust pipes for the solid lifter engines had a crossover pipe arrangement, but otherwise were the same shape and diameter as the base engine application.

 
I can find no reference to your 3752558 part.  Maybe it is 3752556.  To complete the exhaust system you have, you are missing the extension pipes and the tail pipe extension pipes.  The mufflers, without the extensions, were probably also used on the passenger cars.

 
Larry Pearson

 

Charlie:  Some additional information since you are planning to sell these parts.  I have a 1972 Chevrolet  Corvette parts book, and it gives other applications for your exhaust parts.  The mufflers are listed as the low noise service parts for all 1955 (V-8) through 1962 Corvettes. This would apply to the high performance engines also.  The exhaust pipes are listed for all 1957-1962 base engine Corvettes.  The tail pipes are listed for 1957 (without the extensions) through 1960 Corvettes (the 1958-1960 Corvettes would need the extensions, which you don't have).

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

**********

There are two pieces of ss trim on the side of the car, one right behind the gull wing and one on the door . are they side specific? If so how can I tell rt from left?

Gil
 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Gil,
   They are not side specific. The tapered edge on each strip belongs at the hinge door opening. This provides clearance when opening the door. If you do not put the tapered edge here, the door will not open without bending the s/s strips.
Cheers,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi
I have a 1962 Corvette just bought.
I found after I started Driving it, Bad Vibration in drive train.
I put it on a lift and found that some body shimmed the shifter to fit
through floor hole.
They also Shimmed one side of trans Mount , Transmission tail touching X
Frame.
Bought new trans Mount , Installed Mount & took 15 washer out so
shifter  bolted up were it should .
Transmission Mount would not bolt in right, so I look into motor
mounting found by shimming up right side 3/4 inch
transmission moved into alignment . So I pulled Rad , Fan , Hoses out of
the way found Engine Tower Motor Mounts
Look uneven  R/S tower angled down and lower than L/S tower.
Looks like engine needs to come Forward 1/2 Inch.
Can you help me ? I need the Spec for front frame rails  and Engine
Tower Motor Mount?
Any help would be Appreciated
THANK YOU
Sthua

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Stash,
Unfortunately, you might be one of those Corvette lovers who bought somebodys cobbled together wreck.  
If the frame front horns are not bent/buckled/twisted and the wheel alignment is correct, then I suspect that either one or both of the front engine mount bracket to frame http://www.parts123.com/corvettecentral/dyndetail.pta?catalog=0000050e&ukey=29659 are bent.
Worst case, if the frame is bent and alignment is out, new frames are available http://www.vetteproducts.net/ .
 
If you scroll thru the technical help page, you will find my answer to Anthony regarding the location of the motor mount bracket location on his '59 frame rails. The same procedure is applicable to your '62.
 

 

(Anthony's question and answer) follows:

We have a 59 frame that the "L" brackets (both top and bottom) that mount the engine supports bolt to, have been destroyed and we would like to find the exact location for placement of the new "L" bracket. We have been unable to this point to find reference material with specifications & measurements. Can someone help with some direction to acquire these specifications or patterns that will position the brackets properly.

Eye balling of the location from another built frame has proven difficult in being precise.
Thank you

Anthony
 -----------------------------------

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tony,
 
I had the same problem in restoring a 1960 that had been "modified" into a straight front axle dragster.
I also had no luck in finding correct dimensions for locating the "L" brackets.
 
Since the transmission crossmember & trans support were intact, and the transmission / bell housing / engine block / front motor mount support bracket are one structural member, my solution was to literally bolt the components up to the frame.
 
I used a floor jack to raise the front of the block, with the transmission support acting as a fulcrum.
With the all the front motor mount components finger tight, the "L" brackets will pretty much locate themselves..Since my frame was sand blasted, I found grind marks where the previous brackets were ground off confirming the location.
Make sure the your components are centered in the frame and the vertical brackets are perpendicular to the frame horns before clamping the "L" brackets for welding.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

 

Hi, I would like info on becoming a member.  Question:  1962 .  Is there a compression connection in the manifold?
Also, I have a small exhaust leak. 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Don:  The tube from the carburetor  to the exhaust manifold has a compression fitting under the nut that threads into the automatic choke cover.  The other end simply pushes into what is called the "choke stove", which is a steel tube pressed into the exhaust manifold at an angle and is exposed to the hot exhaust gasses which heats up the air being sucked into the automatic choke assembly via manifold vacuum present under the choke cover.  After years of use, this choke stove tube can burn through, causing an exhaust leak into the automatic choke assembly.  Service replacement choke stove tubes should be available from Corvette Central.  To install the new tube, you must carefully drill out the old tube, being careful not to enlarge the holes in the cast iron exhaust manifold.

 
Prior to 1962, the lower end of the choke stove tube was open to the ambient air, and whatever dust and dirt that might be present in that air.  Starting in 1962, a lower tube assembly having a bracket on it that attaches to a special exhaust manifold bolt with a short threaded stud formed on the top of it was introduced.  This tube pushes into the lower end of the choke stove tube and goes up to the vicinity of the rocker arm cover where it ends.  A rubber hose pushes on to it and goes to a short tube located on the side of the carbureter air horn, where it gets filtered air from the air filter.  This choke stove tube is not present on 1962 (only) fuel injected engines.  The 1962 Corvette fuel injection unit is the first one that has a choke valve on the air meter, and this automatic choke is heated with a one-year only electrically heated cover assembly.  Starting in 1963, the fuel injection automatic choke assemblies were again heated via a choke stove in the exhaust manifold.  The 1962 right hand side 2 1/2 inch exhaust manifolds not having the choke stove tube are extremely rare and valuable.

 
Larry Pearson
 

**********

I purchased a 15" Corvette Central steering wheel hub with bell and rivets.  The holes in the steering wheel are smaller than the holes in the hub.  And the hub will not go onto the splines on the steering post. Has anyone else had this problem with the aftermarket parts?   If so, how was the problem remedied?

 
Thank you,
Larry
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Larry,
Your first call should be to Corvette Central for technical help with this.
Original wheels are riveted to the hub whereas aftermarket steering wheels, both 15" & 17", are are bolted together with special screws & nuts that externally appear similar to originals. All hubs are "keyed" so there is only one orientation that fits the shaft spline.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

 

 

 

**********

Any way to get the side mirror GLASS out of the housing? Flopping around. Guessing there is some kind of mech. device in there that needs something done to. Would love to put a Convex in place but so far no luck finding one that's the 4,1/4 dia.

Barry

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Barry:  There is nothing behind the mirror glass to make it tight.  The factory placed the mirror disc in the housing and then a machine rolled the lip of the housing tight against it.  The only way to get the glass out is to break it.  You can tighten it up by taking a suction cup and pull the mirror disc to one side and then work clear RTV Silicone sealant into the gap on the other side.  When the RTV cures, the mirror disc will stop rattling.  You can replace the original disc with a convex mirror if you can find a round convex mirror that is larger than the diameter of the housing and having it cut down by a glass shop to fit in the housing.  Use clear RTV Silicone sealant around the back side of the perimeter of the mirror disc, push it into the housing, and it will be secure when the RTV cures.  I successfully did this with the original outside mirror for my 1951 Oldsmobile when the glass broke all on its own.  The "fix" has been in place for over 30 years now. 

 
For your information, the original glass in your outside mirror is called "Black Glass".  On the original factory mirrors the black surface is on the outside surface of the mirror disc and it is easily scratched, and the scratches cannot be removed without damaging the remainder of the black surface.  On some service replacement mirrors, the black surface is on the back side of the glass.  NCRS judges look for this discrepancy.  There is a way to check it, if you are interested.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

**********

I have a 62 vette with brake shoes. The front end was completely rebuilt 4 years ago which included brakes and bearings as well. Yesterday I applied the brakes at a speed of about 40 mph and suddenly the steering wheel began to shimmy. The shimmy was very noticeable. Never occurred before. Drove home and parked it. I feel it is unsafe to drive.
Can you give me some advice on this unusual behavior what most likely where to begin looking.

Many thanks
Darrell
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  The brake shoes and or drums have become glazed or contaminated by oil or grease and erratic braking is causing the steering wheel to "shimmy".  Fixing this problem is not rocket science as you must examine the brake shoes and drums for these problems.  Sometimes just cleaning and sanding will be enough to correct the problem but complete replacement may be the only solution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a '61 Corvette.  The nuts inside the door that holds the striker plate has rusted and while trying to get them out they broke off.  How can i get in there and place a new striker plate nut componenet so I can put the striker plate on to shut my door?  Any help is appreciated.
 
Harold

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Harold,
As for as I know, there is only one way to access the striker nut plate which is located inside the door jam ( you can barely see it after removing the gas tank cover, but it is not accessable). After removing the rear tires, determine the aprox location of the nut plate in relation to the fender well. Then cut an aprox 5" square hole ( could be round I guess) as neatly as possible in the fender well. At that point you'll be able to access the plate. Once replaced you can glass up the hole using the piece you cut out. Perfect glass work is not necessary since that area of the fender well is undercoated. Once the glass work is complete, re undercoat the area. I have done this several times and it not as difficult as it may sound.

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

I have a 1960 with a 4 speed Muncie. While pulling the engine for a clean up and rebuild I decided to pull the tranny out and clean it up as well. While doing so I noticed that the cross member that the tranny mount is mounted on is spaced down from the x frame members by about 10 3/8 washers. The cross member bolts up to the x frame and does have room to be spaced down but just doesn't seem like something that would be done factory. Before I put it back together I wanted to reach out and see if others are that way as well.
 

 
Thanks

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dusty:  In the first place, the Muncie transmission did not exist in 1960.  I think it was introduced in late 1963 and was used in all the 1964's and later Mid Year Corvettes and sedans.  The 1960 Corvettes with 4-speeds came with iron cased T-10 transmissions with aluminum tail shafts.  How a Muncie transmission installs in a 1960 Corvette is unknown to me, or Chevrolet for that matter.  In 1962, the T-10 became all aluminum and the rear mount was moved forward, requiring a trapezoid shaped adaptor plate to make it work with the existing cross member and in place of the former mounting bracket.   They also used two 1/8 inch thick spacer bars (shims) (one on each side) to slightly lower the rear cross member.  Chevrolet never used washers to space the cross member down.  I suggest that you stack these spacer bars to lower the cross member as needed to make your Muncie work.  Corvette Central sells reproductions of the spacer bars (shims).  According to Corvette Central's catalog, the trapezoidal adaptor plate works to mount a Muncie in C1 Corvettes, and maybe you have it.

 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 


From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Larry is completely correct about the history of the factory transmission mounts prior to 1962.  The adaptor and spacers that he mentions will correctly adapt a Muncie transmission to a C1 Corvette as many others in the hobby have done this conversion.  When done you would think that Duntov and GM thought about of this conversion as it is so simple to do if you know what goes where.  I did it 25 years ago on my 1961.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello: I recently acquired a 1962 Corvette and am in process of restoration. I have been told by the previous owner that the 62 body is mounted on a 1958 frame. However, in replacing the rear axle bearings (outer) I discovered 3 unknown conditions.
1. The axle bearings have a single groove around the perimeter for a single o ring ?
 
2. There is no rear axle seal (garlock type) pressed inside the axle housing?
3. There is a small amount of play (slop) when pushing IN and pulling OUT on the axle shaft when installed and the 4 retainer bolts/plate is torqued in the housing?
 
Question? How can I determine the YEAR of manufacter of my housing?
I suspect that someone has installed 1957 (or earlier) axles and bearings in a 1958 axle housing assembly? Is this possible? I understand that the 1957 bearings are more narrow than those used in 1958.
My differential is a NON-POSI
 
Any help/input would be appreciated.
How do I join your  SACC organization?
Thanks in advance
William

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

William,

 
1.  Your axle bearings with one grove are non posi bearings.
2. the o ring is the axle seal. I always put some sealer in the housing where the bearing seats against the housing just for insurance. The o ring is sometimes not a totally effective seal.
3. I believe that axles are designed to have a small amount of play.

 
I have also read that the 56-7 axles and bearings were different from other years and that posi axles are different lenghts than non posi, but I have never paid any attention to that. I have changed rear ends in many Corvettes and early Chevys and never had a problem. If you're worried about it, I would suggest more research.

 
I believe 56 to 58 axle housings are all the same. 59-62 had the welded brackets for traction bars. All 56 thru 61 have a drain plug. 62's do not.

 
Chip Werstein

**********

1962 corvette, is the cowl vent screen painted body color, or black? 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 
Cowl vent screen is painted body color.

 

 

 

 

 

 


I realize that the top of the vent is painted body color, but the underside of my vent appears to have been painted a flat black. Including the screen. I see no trace of body color in this area. What is correct, all body color, or black and body color? Thanks, Dale Mullins 
 

From: Brad Bean, Solid Axle Corvette Club Vice President:  During an earlier repaint, someone may have painted the screen and underside black, so it would "disappear" when open. Or... bug hits chipped away at the original screen paint and it was easier/cheeper to take a spray can and paint it black. However, the correct/original color would have been the same as the car's exterior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi there . My name is Michael . I'm in Australia . I have a c1 corvette . I Ve completed a frame off restoration on my 61 corvette . I'm stumped with completing replacement  soft top . Try to download Al knocks video on replacing the canvas roof twice . Already spent 80 US dollars and don't have DVDs , I would be eternally grateful if someone could help with tech drawings or knowledge . Thank you
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Michael:  Whoever you bought the top from should have paper instructions with the top telling you how to install the top fabric.  If you have never installed a convertible top before I suggest that you pay an upholstery shop to do it.  If you want to do it yourself, it would be very helpful if the old top was still on the frame so you can see how it was installed.  Or if you have access to another 61 or 62 Corvette so you can see how the top is installed.  The 61 and 62 Corvette top frames are different from the earlier frames.  The rear bow that latches to the rear deck lid is made of aluminum and the top attaches to it with the rubber weatherstripping and a plastic bead that is forced inside the weatherstripping to retain the top fabric to the rear bow.  It is virtually impossible to tell you in words how to install the top fabric on the top frame.  Here are the basic steps you must take to install the top without a lot of detail:

 
1.  Install the six side weatherstrips to the top frame using the metal retainers and special weld nuts on the inside. 
2.  Install the top frame to the car body and adjust the frame up and down and back and forth until it fits the side windows perfectly when the windows are all the way up.  The side frames attach to the front header using slotted holes to assist in making the adjustments.  The window stops must be properly adjusted so that the side windows go up the proper amount.  Not too high or too low.  If you have a hard top, use that to adjust the window stops so that the side windows go up the proper amount.  The linkage that goes up to the center pivot point on the side frames is used to raise the pivot point so it follows the shape of the side window frames.  That is all it does.  Do not proceed until the top frame fits the side windows as perfectly as possible.  Things will only get worse once the top is installed.
3.  Install the top pads to the bows.  The top pads position the bows using flat head screws that secure the pads to the three front bows.  Measure a properly installed top to determine the spacing of the bows.  The bow above the rear window has a tacking strip and the pad is nailed or stapled to this. Don't attach it until step 6. The pads attach to the front header with nails or staples into tacking strips.  Don't attach until step 7.
4.  Remove the rear bow from the top frame and install the top to it using the rear deck weatherstrip and a plastic bead that is forced inside the weatherstrip to retain the top fabric to the rear bow.  Make sure it is accurately centered.  Install the two fabric straps that go on each side of the rear window to the rear bow using the metal clamps.  These clamps go on the inside of the car, not on the outside under the top fabric. These straps protect the rear window from excess stress that could tear it.
5.  Reinstall the rear bow to the top frame and clamp it to the deck lid using the two chrome clamps. You may find it necessary to unlatch the rear bow during the stapling process to make everything tight.  Now you have the top fabric attached to the rear bow and things get very difficult from this point if you want to avoid wrinkles.  You may have to re-do the job several times to get everything straight and tight and wrinkle free.  Don't cut the top fabric and pads to size until everything is right.  The top must end up being very tight on the frame or it will "balloon" at speed.
6.  The rear window fabric overlaps the top fabric at the rear window bow, which has a tacking strip for attaching the top.  The order of attachment is:  the rear window straps, then the pads, then the rear window fabric, then the top fabric, and last the "wire-on" binder (step 10).
7.  Nail or staple the pads to the front header.
8.  Roll the top fabric over the front header and nail it and the small side tabs to the tacking strips under the header.  After everything is right, screw the front header weatherstrip to the front header using the metal retainer and the oval head screws.
9.  Attach the side flaps to the top frame verticals using 3M weatherstrip adhesive.  The vertical weatherstrips have to be removed to do this.  Install the small corner weatherstrips that bridge the gap between the top frame and the rear bow weatherstrip before reinstalling the vertical weatherstrips.
10.  Using a silicone sealer, attach the "wire-on" binder on to the rear window tacking strip using tacks or staples. It is important that this area be sealed against water leakage to avoid water wicking onto the cloth backing on the top material, causing water stains inside the car.  Install the chrome ends to the "wire-on" binder after trimming them to the proper length.  Go inside the car and use a pin to locate the existing mounting holes.
 

**********

Greetings All - I'm a new owner of a 1962 Corvette which has the
original Wonderbar radio that does not work.  I think this is not an
unusual situation, so I hope others may give me the benefit of their
experience on how to remove this radio and advice on getting it
repaired.  Thank you in advance for your assistance.  Jim

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jim,
 
 
Congratulations on your "new" car.
Both my 1960's had non-functional Wonderbar radios that needed to be repaired.
Removal is relatively low tech after you have reviewed your 1962 Corvette Assembly Manual
(available from Corvette Central or Mid-America).
 
You may have to remove the package tray and pass side console-to-kick panel lower panel get access.
 
Disconnect the radio power wiring connector( LR), the radio speaker connector (Top) & antenna cable ( RR).
Then, remove the two radio knob sets & two retainer nuts.
 
Various cables, wiring, defroster duct & console lower trim may need to be moved aside or disconnected to allow the radio to  drop down & pulled out.
 
Support the bottom of the radio while you  remove the 1/2-20 7/16 head screw from the radio/support strap on the passenger side.
Both my Wonderbar radios were repaired at Corvette Clocks by Roger, in Jackson, TN. http://www.corvetteclocks.com/
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Good afternoon. Although I am not yet a member of your organization, I would appreciate your help with an issue I am having in converting from the road draft tube. I have looked in the Adams restoration book and also found that NCRS concludes that the correct PVC valve for the 62 via the AIM is 5649561. The problem is that the part listed is not identified other than the number listed. A search on that number is that the valve is discontued. There is no history or superseded number. There is also no CV-xxx identifier. My car is a fairly late build (12916/14531) and the valve for 63 is cv-590. I would appreciate any information concerning the correct valve for my car. Thank you in advance.  Don

From: Doug Prince, SOCAL Chapter Advisor:  AC Delco no longer services the CV-590 PV valve.  It is available from Paragon Reproduction Parts as their part number 14824 and is stamped correctly and is black oxide in color like the originals were. You will also need their part number 4318 which is a road draft tube adaptor and their part number 542K adaptor bolt and gasket kit.  These parts were all part of RPO 242 California Emissions.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Bill Preston, Red River Chapter Advisor: 

If the issue is just getting the car converted to a PCV valve system here's the solution:

 
Get an adapter from Paragon (part #4318 for $75)  or salvage from an early model Chevy (64--66) 
that goes where the draft tube went.
You can then use rubber hose from that up to the manifold with a PCV valve(Part # 8560 for $36)  in the hose.
 

 
If you need to meet NCRS criteria this is not the answer.

Bill Preston

 

 

 

**********

Hello to everyone

I recently purchased a 1961 Corvette and just realized when I pull the hood release, the hood passenger side will not pop up. I’ve looked online for solutions without any success. Does anyone have any suggestions? I think the barrel lock on the cable slipped and now cannot pull the release arm.
 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

This seemingly insignificant part and it's failure causes much distress and to C-1 owners annually.  Those who have had this problem (or have heard the horror stories from those who have), take a pair of pliers and bend a small "L" in the wire, so if the barrel screw comes loose, the bend will catch the barrel and still open the hood.  But, this is a preventive measure, not a solution to your current problem.  Unfortunately, the solution to your problem is more tedious and time consuming. 

 
Not reccomended, but most simple... I've heard of some owners, who had a poor quality hood, and didn't mind damaging it... so, they drilled a hole in the hood and pushed down on the release with a screwdriver, throughout the hole, then repaired & painted the hood.

 
However, a more painless method is to jack up the front end of your car and place it on sturdy jack stands, allowing you to access the engine bay from underneath. First, remove the right front wheel and tire.  Then remove the clutch head screws holding the wheel well splash shield and remove the splash shield.  This will give you access to the battery box from underneath.  You must then remove the battery box, disconnect the battery and remove it, by lowering it through the splash shield opening.

 
Becauase you will doing this by feel, knowing where screws/bolts are located is important, so consulting an assembly manual or looking at another '61 will help.  

 
You should then be able to work your hand up thorough the opening and pull down on the release.  If your arms are not long enough, some sort of long shaft tool, with a hook or an "L" on the end (such as a upholstery tool) will help.

 
Good luck.

**********
We have a 59 frame that the "L" brackets (both top and bottom) that mount the engine supports bolt to, have been destroyed and we would like to find the exact location for placement of the new "L" bracket. We have been unable to this point to find reference material with specifications & measurements. Can someone help with some direction to acquire these specifications or patterns that will position the brackets properly.

Eye balling of the location from another built frame has proven difficult in being precise.
Thank you

Anthony
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tony,
 
I had the same problem in restoring a 1960 that had been "modified" into a straight front axle dragster.
I also had no luck in finding correct dimensions for locating the "L" brackets.
 
Since the transmission crossmember & trans support were intact, and the transmission / bell housing / engine block / front motor mount support bracket are one structural member, my solution was to literally bolt the components up to the frame.
 
I used a floor jack to raise the front of the block, with the transmission support acting as a fulcrum.
With the all the front motor mount components finger tight, the "L" brackets will pretty much locate themselves..Since my frame was sand blasted, I found grind marks where the previous brackets were ground off confirming the location.
Make sure the your components are centered in the frame and the vertical brackets are perpendicular to the frame horns 
before clamping the "L" brackets for welding.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

I'm not a member yet but I could use your help. I have a '56 that  the rear wiring harness was stripped out. I need to know the path of the new harness through the body work into the rear. I don't find any appropriate holes.

Ken

1956 Corvette
 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Ken, Order a reproduction factory assembly manual for your '56 from either Corvette Central or Mid America Motorworks.  It will show you how the wiring harness is routed.  They run about $25.00.  

Max

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1962 that had the wrong OS mirror and I'm putting on the Y-50, but holes don't match. I need to know the correct placement before drilling new holes and sending to paint. I would appreciate any help on this matter.

 
Thanks
Kevin

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Kevin:  Except for the first few 1953 Corvettes produced, all 53-62 Corvettes came from the factory with Y-50 mirrors installed on the driver's door.  This was not true for Chevrolet sedans and trucks, which came without mirrors, and the selling dealer would sell and install one of several mirror designs available if the customer wanted an outside mirror.  Therefore detailed installation information is available on where to drill the holes on sedans and trucks, but not for Corvette.
The Corvette Assembly Instruction Manual (AIM) shows how the factory installed the mirror on page B28.  It says this:  "Drill two .219 dia. holes in inner panel to match outer panel after bonding".  So, evidently the outer door skin came pre drilled with the two mounting holes, and after it was bonded to the inner panel, the assembly line drilled the two holes through the inner panel.  After the car was painted, the Y-50 mirror got mounted using the mounting bracket and a paper gasket and two machine screws with a lock washer and nut. 
You indicate that you are having your 62 painted.  I recommend that you sand down to bare fiberglass in the area where the original Y-50 mirror was mounted and you should be able to locate the original holes that have probably been filled in.  Re-drill the original holes using a .219 inch drill and make sure that they line up with the mirror mounting bracket before having the car painted.

 
Larry Pearson

 

**********

I'm finding conflicting answers to the question, "Is the windshield wiper mounting plate supposed to be the bare metal finish, or painted semi gloss black"? I plan to have the car judged so need a NCRS correct response.
Thank you in advance.
Robert
 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

The wiper transmission plate was installed prior to engine compartment black out. So it should be semi gloss black. Consult your ncrs judging manual for conformation.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 


 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Robert:  The windshield wiper mounting plate was in place when the under hood blackout painting was done, and therefore the entire plate including the mounting hardware (the screw heads) got painted with the same semigloss black paint.  The wiper motor was mounted later and has no blackout paint on it.

 

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 


 

 

**********

Hi  We have problem with our fuel injection on 1962  won’t run at stop lights.  We have had the fuel injection system rebuilt.  We are looking for someone in California who can really work on this system.  We have heard about a specialist in Hesperia California.  I cannot find anything on the web.  Do you know any specialists in fuel injections in California?  Any help is appreciated.  Kathy

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Kathy

Fuel cars hate today's gas. I don't drive mine unless it's a cool day. There is no fix for the problem except 100 plus octane leaded gas. The southern California expert is in Canoga park .......Doug Prince.......818 425 0679

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Kathy,

Your fuel injection problem is not unique to anybody in SoCal where our summer temperatures reach 90 degree or more.  The problem is California gas is just terrible and  our summer blend makes everything worse. The fuel injection “spider lines” are only 40 thousands ID and are made from copper which is an excellent transfer of heat which causes the gasoline in them to boil and percolate.  Fuel injection cars with ambient under hood temperatures over 180 degrees will not idle or restart after engine shutoff.  I have been involved with rebuilding and restoring fuel injection units for over 35 years and I am currently on the technical list for the SoCal Chapter of Solid Axle Corvettes from our beginning.  Feel free to call me at 818-425-0679 for any suggestions that might help you but there is no easy fix for the problem of poor or no idle at stop lights. Rebuilding of your fuel injection unit will not solve your problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your brief description of the problem you are having raises a lot of questions that need answers.  It won't run at stop lights.  Does this mean that the engine won't idle?  Not cold, not hot, not over 180 degrees, not ever?  With the correct aluminum radiator, 170 degree thermostat, fan clutch, fan shroud, fan, and timing, the engine should not run over 180 degrees.  A hot engine will cause all the problems with California's gasoline that have been described by the others.  Does it run just fine off idle?  The unit has been rebuilt, but did anyone properly adjust the idle fuel and idle speed screws on the Air Meter?  Was the proper idle speed set?  On FI engines it must be set around 850 rpm.  If it was adjusted much  below 800 rpm, the engine will die, because the high pressure pump located at the rear of the Fuel Meter cannot deliver sufficient fuel pressure for the engine to idle at low engine speeds.  If the pump is badly worn, the idle speed may have to be set higher than 900rpm.  There could be problems with clogged passageways in the Air Meter idle circuit. This happened to me.  Is the unit a true 1962 unit, or is it a collection of parts from various units?  The Rochester part numbers for the 1962 Corvette were 7017355 (very early), and 7017360 (most of the 62's).  The 1962 unit was the first unit to have a true choke on the air meter, and for that reason is considered to be, possibly, the best unit of all of them, including 63-65 units.  By 1962, Rochester had most of the bugs worked out of their Ramjet Fuel Injection system.  The 1962 Ramjet units usually work very well, even with the bad gas.  Mine does.

 To learn more about your fuel injection unit, you need to read pages 6M-1 through 6M-33 in Chevrolet's official shop manual for the solid axle Corvettes, Corvette Servicing Guide, publication ST-12.  This book is available as a reprint from all the Corvette parts suppliers.  The Fuel Injection section in 6M deals mostly with your 1962 unit.  Compare the pictures with what you have.

Larry Pearson

 

**********

how to replace a 1961 corvette speedometer housing. is there a bulkhead under the dash? I try  and it wont come out
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

HB Chevy,
 
The speedometer housing is attached on the interior area of the Instrument Cluster by two Phillips head machine screws. 
To get access to those, the instrument cluster has to be disassembled from the dashboard which is held in by 5- 5/16 bolts. The "bulkhead" is the cluster support bracket which does NOT require removal. Just make sure you have located all 5 attachment bolts.
The two on the outside (closest to the driver) are hidden under the dash pad.
 
Keep in mind that you are playing in some expensive/entensive effort territory if you tear the pad or break the cluster casting.
Use masking tape to tag any wiring you disconnect to remove the cluster housing.
Take digital pictures BEFORE you tear into this area. Trust me. You WILL forget exactly how to reassemble.
 
All this information (and more) is available in the assembly manual for your car (that you haven't read yet, but will I hope)
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

I'm not a member yet, but will be..I've purchased a 1954 all original corvette. It runs great but I noticed something. When I start the car the oil pressure gauge does not want to kick in until I hit the accelerator a little bit. Almost like the rpms need to hit a certain point for it to work. While sitting idle after starting it will climb to 30-35 psi and stays that way while driving. But once the engine is hot and a few miles on it when I come to a redlight or stop the oil pressure drops to 15-20 psi.
I cannot find anywhere the specs for what it should be. Any help would be most appreciated. Thank you in advance..
Duke

From: Bruce Fuhrman,SACC Secretary: 

Hi Duke,
    Congrats on your new '54. There are 2 different oil pumps used on the 235 engine in '54. Until about May of 1954 they used a 1/2" gear pump. They then switched to a 3/4" gear to provide more pressure to the rod bearings. Assuming you have an early VIN (below 3000) you still have the smaller pump, the pressures you are reading seem about normal for an engine that is 62 yrs. old. As far as the low pressure at start up it could be several things. The oil gear pump is rpm sensitive and the pressure should rise with engine rpm. If the car sits for several days the copper tube to the gage does drain down and will take some time to refill and reflect pressure on the gage. The gage is old school and a direct pressure not electric via a pressure diaphragm. There may be some old sludge in the copper line to the gage and you may want to remove it  and clean it out with solvent and air pressure.
 
Hope this helps,
Bruce Fuhrman
1954 Corvette

 

 

**********

My 59 Corvette has the word ivory written in the trunk could you please tell me what that means?
Mark
 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  Before these cars were painted, workers wrote the primary exterior color name inside the trunk, on the fiberglass wall separating the passenger compartment and trunk with a grease pencil.  This writing would have been painted over, but sometime the outline is still visible (if not removed during a restoration).  

89 Corvettes were painted "Classic Cream" for 1959 and only 5 were painted "special" colors. Although a layman might mistake the color name, it's doubtful an assembly workers would have made that error when writing the car's color name.

This is a long shot, but if written in the afore mentioned manner and location, it may merit some additional research and documentation.  If your car is one of the 5 "special color" Corvettes and was originally painted "Ivory" at the St. Louis, assembly plant, you may have a rare car.

 

 


 

From: Chip Werstein, Southern California Chapter Advisor: 

Noland Adams documented this subject quite well many years ago. Note that during the C-1 years there were 3 different "whites" used. 53-57 was polo white. 58-60 was snowcrest white and 61-62 was ermine white. Starting in 1958 the primary body color was written in green grease pencil on the right side of the fiberglass trunk divider. Although I can't recall ever checking a white 59 trunk, I have seen several 60 white cars with the color indicated as ivory............never white. I have also seen black, turq, maroon,silver,red, and charq. I can assume that all 58- 60 Corvettes painted white will have ivory written in the trunk. 

 
Why did the St. Louis factory call the Corvette color Ivory rather than white? My guess...........and it is only a guess...........is that there were other cars and trucks built in St. Louis that may have used different white paints. Perhaps each "white" was given a nickname so it wouldn't get accidently used on the wrong vehicle. Ivory my have been a Corvette only color or maybe stated better, ivory was the only white that was to be used on a Corvette. With all that said, ivory written in the trunk of your 59 tells us your car was painted snowcrest white at the factory.

 
Chip Werstein


From: Max Brockhouse,SACC President:  Actually, Ivory is a 1959 color.  I have seen one other Corvette with ivory, a parts car.  If Larry Richter were still with us, he could fill in the blanks.  I believe it was  a late production color, changed from Classic Cream.  Most likely  a very "low" production number.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I bought my 55 Corvette in the 70's with a non original engine and the VIN has the V scratched in rather than stamped.  I know in those days a lot of "hand" assembly was going on but in my older years I started wondering if this was originally a 6 cylinder, are there any other markers I can look for to establish whether this was originally a 6 or V8. 
 
Larry

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Larry,
   The only clues I can offer are as follows;
1. The '54 all had VIN #'s E54S0XXXX
2. The '55 had 2 versions; 6 Cyl was E55S0XXX, The V-8 had a prefix "V" either stamped or etched in front of the VIN.
3. Other clues, there should be a gold V on each front fender above the CHEVROLET for the V-8 version.
4. The V-8 engine required a small notch being cut in the right front frame to accommodate the V-8 fuel pump.
5. There is a VIN # stamped on the top of the frame just below the drivers seat (left cheek) that is only visible only by cleaning and applying chalk and wipe off then use a flashlight and mirror. Option, remove body to check VIN # !! 
    There were only a limited # of 6 cyl. cars built in 55.
 Hope this helps,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 


**********

Hi:
I have the same engine as in your vettes…My is 235 three YH’s In my dirt track race car.
 
I have trouble adjusting to get a smooth Idle…
 
I have a gauge to measure air intake…
 
Please give me the first settings to start…
 
Thanks
 
 
Ivan

From: Bruce Furhman, Sacc Secretary:

Hi Ivan,
  I have a '54 with the same 3 stock carbs. There is a small balance hole in the manifold between all 3 that negates me having to balance all separately. Each carb feeds 2 cylinders. I am able to control the idle by adjusting the small idle screws on the front of the carbs. Only idle issue I have experienced is when the carb accelerator pumps made of rubber (about 3/4" in dia.) have small pin holes which bleed into the carb throttle body and cause a rich idle. The pin holes are caused by the fuel (MTBE) additive which eat away at the rubber. If the carb accelerator pumps are over 7 years old they may be suspect. They can be replaced without removing the carbs from the manifold.  Overhaul kits can be purchased from several sources on the Internet.
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman   

 

 

 

 

**********

Installing a package tray in a 62 corvette:

The tray has been installed incorrectly in my car, I have ordered the 19 piece install kit but I cannot see where the  “l-brackets hook” any help will be appreciated              thanks

Charles
 

From:  Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:   Charles:  The installation instructions for all the pieces you have are found in the 1962 Corvette Assembly Instruction Manual (1962 Corvette AIM), which is available from all the major Corvette Parts Suppliers.  This is a document that the Corvette designers prepared for the assembly plant to use to assemble the car and has been reproduced for Corvette restorers to use.  The information you need is found in Section B, sheet 12 "Tray-Instrument Panel".  I assume that all the holes are already drilled in your instrument panel.  If not, the job will be more difficult, because the AIM does not specify where to drill the holes in the instrument panel where two "L" brackets and three screws along the back of the tray attach to.  The AIM does not have written instructions on how to install the pieces.  The drawing just shows a "blowup" showing all the parts.  None of the installation screws thread directly into the instrument panel fiberglass.  Clip nuts or machine screws and nuts must be used.  Two "L" brackets are riveted to the tray.  If yours are not riveted to the tray and no rivets were supplied, you will have to use machine screws with with lock washers.  These two "L" brackets screw to two other "L" brackets that attach to the instrument panel on each side of the tray.  Of course, the tray must be painted to match the interior color.

 
The Corvette Servicing Guide, ST-12, is the "official" Chevrolet shop manual for the Solid Axle Corvettes.  It is also available from the Corvette Parts Suppliers as a reprint.  The installation of the Instrument Panel Tray is illustrated in Figure 14 on page 1-7 and a brief instruction is found on page 1-8 of this book.

 
Larry Pearson

 

**********

My 61 vette's horn will not blow. When I press on
 the horn button it tries to blow and stops. The generator
 shows total negative discharge until I remove my hand from
 the horn. Any help or suggestions on this matter is greatly
 appreciated.

Harold

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  Harold:  You don't say if this is a new problem that suddenly came up, or if the horns never worked.  So I will tell you how the horns are activated and how to troubleshoot the problem.

Your Corvette originally came with two horns that are mounted on the left and right side of the area in front of the radiator.  These horns consist of a high note and a low note horn.  The horns are marked where the sound comes out with a "H" for high note and a "L" for low note. The horns are mounted so that their outlets point toward the grille, not up or not down.   Does your car have both horns? You can see them from outside the car through the grille.   If not, you need to purchase one or both horns.  If you have skinny arms and small hands, reach in with the hood open and determine if the horns are securely attached to the car fiberglass.  If one or both are loosely attached, you need to tighten the 1/2 inch hex bolts attaching them.  The attaching hardware for each horn consists of a 1/2 inch hex bolt with a 5/16 inch coarse thread, an external star lock washer (to penetrate the black paint on the horn body and give the horn body a good ground connection), and a ground lug with a black wire on it.  All this threads into a steel nut plate that is rivited with two aluminum rivets to the inner fender fiberglass panel on the wheelwell side.  If you need to tighten or loosten these bolts, make sure that they are not rusted in place.  Examine them from the wheelwell side with a flashlight and spray the threads with WD 40 or something like it.  These bolts are grade 3 and it is easy to break them off if you use too much force.  Believe me, you do not want to break this bolt off!!!  Corvette Central sells replacement nut plates and attaching rivets, but it is very difficult to install the rivets with the inner fender in place.  Chevy riveted the nut plate in place on the inner fender before they bonded the inner fender to the car body.

The horns are activated by a Horn Relay, which is attached to the driver's side inner fender fiberglass, just behind the radiator header, with two Phillips head self tapping screws.  The original relays had a black painted cover, or a silvery cadmium plated cover.  Either cover version is embossed with the words"Delco Remy".  The Horn Relay has three wires connected to it using slotted head screws.  The terminals are marked "S", "B", and "H" (according to the wiring diagram).  I do not have a horn relay in front of me.  The "S" wire is a 20 gauge tan wire and it goes to the horn button inside the car.  The "B" wire is a 12 gauge red wire and goes to the car battery 12 volt supply.  The "H" wire is a 14 gauge black wire and connects to the push on terminals on both horns. (Remember:  the lower the wire size number, the bigger the wire is.)  This black wire applys 12 volts to both horns simultaneously to activate them.  When the horns are activated, the coils inside of them draw lots of current, and that is why the ammeter shows a severe discharge when the horns are activated.  When you depress the horn button inside the car, it applies a ground to the 20 gauge tan wire on the Horn Relay, causing the relay coil to energize and apply 12 volts to the horns.  If the horns don't blow, take a dc voltmeter and verify that the "B" terminal on the relay has 12 volts on it (it always has 12 volts on it, and if it doesn't, you have to fix it), and the "H" terminal has 12 volts on it when the relay is activated with the horn button.  If the voltage on the "H" terminal measures less than 12 volts, the contact inside the relay may be corroded and the relay is defective.  You can pry the tabs on the relay cover open and access the inside of the relay.  You may be able to file or sand the contact surfaces to remove the corrosion and restore the relay to proper operation.  If the activating coil is bad, you may be able to fix it or you will have to replace the Horn Relay.  You can activate the Horn Relay from under the hood by applying a ground from the engine block (the engine block on our Corvettes is "ground", not the car's frame) directly to the "S" terminal on the relay using a jumper wire.  If the horns work by applying a ground directly to the relay, but the horn button inside the car doesn't activate the relay, then the problem is inside the steering wheel hub or the wiring from the slip ring inside the hub to the relay via the tan wire to the relay.

If everything checks out ok to this point, then the problem is with the horns or the wiring going to the horns from the Horn Relay "H" terminal or the ground wire connected to each horn.  Check that both horns have a black ground wire connected to their mounting bolts and that the bolts are tight.  Each horn is powered with a push on terminal on the end of the horn wire.  Make sure that these connections to the horn terminals are pushed on all the way and are tight.  If everything checks out ok and the horns still don't work, then remove the wire from one of the horns and see if the other horn works.  If it doesn't, then that horn needs adjusting or rebuilding.  Disconnect the second horn and see if the other horn works.  Usually only one horn is defective, and you need to determine which one it is.  These horns have an adjusting screw on them.  You can use a 1/4 inch socket to adjust the screw.  This adjusting screw can be used to optimize the sound, or get the horn working if it doesn't work.  You should not have to turn the adjusting screw more than one turn in either direction to activate the horn.  Turning the screw excessively in a clockwise direction can damage the insides of the horn.  If one or both horns can't be made to work when mounted to the car, you will have to remove the defective horn(s) from the car.  Once outside the car, try to activate the inoperative horn by connecting it directly to a 12 volt car battery.  Connect the horn mounting bracket to the negative battery terminal (just push it against the terminal) and use a heavy duty (at least 14 gauge) jumper from the battery positive  to the horn terminal and see if you can adjust the horn to work.  If it still doesn't work, a rebuilding service is available through Corvette Central to rebuild your horn, or you can buy a service replacement horn.  These horns fail when water gets into the inner workings of the horn through a defective paper gasket that was used to seal the top and bottom pieces of the horn.  The horn consists of a top and bottom zinc die casting that is connected with a series of rivets through a paper gasket.  If the gasket fails, rain water gets inside the horn and rusts the electrical connections.  If you like to fix things, you can drill out the connecting rivets and try to clean up the rusted connections.  Re-attach things using aluminum rivets or screws and nuts with lock washers.  Use plenty of RTV sealant in place of the paper gasket.  I've done it!  Don't discard an inoperative original horn.  The core is valuable.

Larry Pearson

**********

As My car was featured in the Summer 2015 issue of SACC Magazine I forgot to remember that My car came with a driver's compartment tonneau cover, ie, a 3 top car.
Does any one else in the club have or know of any such aftermarket accessory?
 
One of the previous owners must have had a great sense of style to go to the expence to show off His car as something Special !
 
John

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President: 

This most likely was installed by an upholstery shop.  This was very popular to do to the  two setter convertibles in the 60's.  Road racing was becoming of age and it provided an edge against wind resistance in an open cockpit.  Usually, it had a zipper allowing the driver to be out to drive then it could be zipped shut to keep out the elements.  Normally, it had snaps all the way around so it could be totally removed to allow for your girlfriend to ride too.  Even if you did not road race, it made you look cool to have one.

I bought my first '57 T-bird in '69 and it had one installed on it when I purchased it.  Be proud you own a piece of car hobby history and how times change.

Max Brockhouse SACC President E-mail: saccmb@hotmail.com

 

**********

HI GENTLEMAN , I HAVE A 1959 CORVETTE THAT
CAME WITH  THE OPTION HARD TOP ONLY, I NOW HAVE  BOUGHT  THE
CONVT  TOP BOW ASSY.  EXAMINATION OF WHERE THE CONVT BOW ASSY WOULD
MOUNT TO THE BODY,'' BEHIND THE  SEATS'' I DON'T SEE  THE MOUNTING
 BOLT HOLES, MY QUESTION IS, AT THE FACTORY BUILD, WERE THE BRACKETS MOLDED
IN THE FIBERGLASS, EVEN IF THE CAR CAME WITH THE HARDTOP ONLY
OPTION ?   THANK YOU  SAM, ACTON
CA.

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Purchase your self an assembly instruction manual for a '59 from either Corvette Central or Mid America Motor Works (about $25.00).  It will show you what metal brackets are missing that will allow you to mount your soft top.  Do you have the rear hold down clamps on your deck lid?  If not, you will need them as well.  Hardtops are held down with bolts.

Max Brockhouse SACC President


 


From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Sam,
 
Simple question with a comlex answer.
The first thing you must do is get an 1959 Corvette Assembly Manual.
Use it to identify all the various support brackets, mounting brackets, fasteners, rear deck lid and soft top rear attachment latches that are required to complete the transition.
 
Go visit a friend with a '58-'62 convertible and ask to look & take pictures of his car.
All the parts you need are available in after-market from various Corvette parts vendors.
In addition, although they are used and may be more expensive, original parts can still be found.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

Restoring my 62 corvette I have no pics of the internal parts of the doors
and where they go. Do you have pics of the doors or some kind of print?
Maybe you can show how to reinstall all the door parts with new felt and
rubber. Thanks Bob   
 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Purchase one or both of these book/manual; Noland Adams' THE COMPLETE CORVETTE RESTORATION & TECHNICAL GUIDE-VOL.1 1953-1962 or a 1962 assembly instruction manual.  Nolands' book is out of print and the assembly manuals can be ordered from mail order companies such as Corvette Central or Mid-America.

Max Brockhouse SACC President E-mail: saccmb@hotmail.com

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Bob:  All the answers to your questions about anything to do with your 1962 Corvette are to be found in Chevrolet's official Corvette Service Manual:  "Corvette Servicing Guide", publication #ST-12.  This Service Manual is available as a reprint from all the major Corvette Parts Suppliers.  The Doors are covered in Section 1 BODY, pages 1-13 through 1-20.  Almost any parts that you need are available from Corvette Central.  More service parts are available today than were available from Chevrolet when your car was new.

Another source for information on how your 1962 was built can be found in the 1962 CORVETTE ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTION MANUAL (AIM).  This manual is a reprint of a publication done by Corvette Engineering and consists of Engineering drawings showing the St Louis Assembly Plant how to build the car.  Information on the doors is found in Section F:  Side Doors, pages B53-B66.  

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

 

**********

Tail lights, brake lights, interior light, instrument lights not working.
The above mentioned lights all worked a few months ago, now not so. The rear blinkers work, (canceling switch no) and front parking lamps light.
I am targeting the main light switch, but just read about the issues caused by the turn signal switch.
Due to both brake light out, tail lights out, and insturment and interior lights out all at the same time, I believe the  light switch is culprit. (Fuses all ok)
All help or suggestions appreciated!  -Ed

From: Larry Pearson, Southern California Chapter:  Ed:  You don't say what year Corvette you have, and that might affect the recommendations I am making.  The front parking lights and rear tail lights have bulbs with two filiaments in them.  The smaller size filiament is for the running lights that come on when the headlight switch knob is pulled out to the first click and continue to operate when the knob is pulled completely out, activating the headlights in addition to the running lights.  The larger filiament in these bulbs are activated by the turn signal switch.  In addition, the brake light switch activates this larger filiament on the rear lights only.  If the turn signal is activated while applying the brakes, the flasher unit interrupts the brakelight filiament on one side only.  Therefore, if the brake lights don't work in the tail lights, the problem is either the brake light switch located under the dash just above the brake pedal arm, or the turn signal switch.  If the mechanical mechanism that returns the turn signal handle to the center position doesnt work properly, and wiggling it gets the brake lights to work, then the problem is in this mechanism, and you need to fix it.  Or the problem could be in the turn signal switch itself if the wiggling doesn't get the brake lights working.  The headlight switch is not involved with the brake lights or the turn signal light function.  

The turn signal switch can be taken apart by bending the four tabs up and carefully pulling it open.  There are two sliding contacts, each having a spring under them that push them up against metal contacts cast into the bakelite housing.  Don't lose the springs or the contacts, and note how the contacts are oriented.  Maybe the contact surfaces are oxadised and cleaning them will fix the problem.  Or the small springs may have overheated and partially collapsed, resulting in insufficient pressure to push the sliding contacts into a good connection.  Pulling on the springs to stretch them may restore their length and now things will work.  Replace any grease that you remove with a similar type grease to minimise contact wear.  Another possibility is bad solder joints where the colored wires connect to the switch terminals.  If the switch is bad and cannot be fixed, Corvette Central sells a replacement switch assembly.  When pushing the switch wires into the car connector, use long nose pliers to push them all the way in until they "click", or, in my experience, they will become disconnected.  Check that these connections are solid by gently pulling on them, because this might be the source of your problem.

The headlight switch controls the headlights, the parking lights in front, the running lights in the rear tail lamps, the instrument lights including the clock and radio, and the courtesy light(s)(these were optional before 1961 and may not be present in your car).  As explained above, pulling out the headlight control knob should result in the front and rear running lights being activated and the headlights being activated.  Turning this knob fully counterclockwise should activate the courtesy light(s)(if you have them).  Turning this knob clockwise should increase the brightness of the instrument lights to full bright when fully clockwise.  If the instrument lights brightness function is erratic, then the variable resistor (rheostat) windings on the front of the headlight switch need to be polished using fine sandpaper, along with the contacting surface on the wiper to remove corrosion that forms on these surfaces over time.  If the headlight switch functions don't work properly, the switch needs to be removed from the instrument housing for repair or replacement.  Disconnect the car battery before attempting to remove the headlight switch.  Remove the knob by pushing it all the way in and then depressing a spring loaded button on the bottom surface of the switch and then pulling the knob assembly all the way out of the switch.  Depressing the spring loaded button on the bottom of the switch releases the knob assembly from the switch.  With the knob removed from the switch, unscrew the special retaining nut using long nose pliers applied to the two notches.  Unplug the switch from the wiring harness plug and inspect the terminals on the top of the switch for evidence of overheating and loosness.  Maybe the big connector was not pushed all the way onto the terminals on top of the switch.  If nothing appears wrong, you can test the switch out of the instrument cluster and see if now it works.  If everything looks fine but the switch still doesn't work, you can pop it open and see if all the internal contacts look good.  Rebend the internal contacts as needed to make better contact and clean any corrosion off the contacts.  Polish the rheostat windings top surface and the contacting susrface of the wiper to improve its function.  If the switch still doesn't work, you will probably have to buy a new switch.  Again Corvette Central sells the switch.

**********

Hi
 SACC!
 Does a real, original NOS front bumper for 1958 have
 waves on the metal surface (under the chrome) of the
 bumper?I was told it should not have any waves,
 only the chrome process can be of poor quality (not show
 chrome).  A real NOS bumper is suppose to have a
 straight, flat surface.
 Also, can someone obtain a GM license, make a bumper
 and put a GM sticker on the bumper, calling it
 NOS?
 Aloha,
 Eric
 Corvette Clubs Hawaii State

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Eric.  An original "real" 1958-1960 and 1961-1962 front bumper has waves in it at the corner where the bumper turns to the side of the car.  This is because the bumper was constructed in two pieces and welded together at the corner, resulting in some waves where the welding was done, even after polishing.  Of course, a plating shop can grind all of these waves out and make the surface perfect.  GM could have made the surface perfect at the time of original manufacture, but this would take more labor and cost more money.  The original plating may also have streaks and roughness in parts of the bumper, especially on the lower side. It was not show quality.  Also, I have observed that GM service replacement bumpers were not finished as well as the original production bumpers installed at the time of manufacture of the car.  Service replacement bumpers sold by GM Parts Division were shipped in a corrugated cardboard box, not shipped bare with a sticker on
 them.  No GM logos or part numbers were stamped into the metal of original or GM service replacement bumpers, so, in my opinion, no license from GM would be needed to reproduce them.  These bumpers were discontinued by GM years ago, but are still being reproduced and sold by the Corvette parts suppliers.  I don't know if the current reproduction bumpers are being manufactured using the original GM tooling, but the quality is at least as good as the originals.  If you are planning to have NCRS judge your car, consult their Judging Manuals to see if deductions are being made for "over restoration"  for perfect bumpers.

 

 

**********

I purchased the car after it had had a frame off restoration and do not know the history.
When I purchased the car it was shipped directly to Calgary Alberta where it remained for three years and there were no problems with the paint.
I then had the car shipped to my shop in Corpus Christi where after the first summer the paint blisters appeared mostly on the front fenders and nose and grill areas.
The paint was stripped and car was repainted.  After the first summer the paint blisters reappeared but not necessarily in the same spots.
The hood, trunk, rear fenders, rear end never blustered.  The blisters on the doors were minimal.
Corpus is hot in the summer with high humidity, the opposite of Calgary, Alberty.
Thanks for taking the time to address my paint issues.
Don
 

From Bill Preston, Red River Chapter Advisor: 

It's been my experience that paint blisters come from one of three sources: contaminants embedded in the fiberglass from stripper and other chemicals, solvent trapped due to not waiting long enough between coats of paint, or trapped moisture. The only solution is to take the paint back off and thoroughly clean the fiberglass and let it sit in the 100 degree Texas sun for about a week before applying primer, etc. (A body shop bake oven will cure it too)


 
If there were fiberglass repairs in the bubbling areas, the Bondo tends to hold the contaminants more than the fiberglass itself.

 
Bill Preston

 

 

 

**********

There is NO bolt hole in cranks nose
For installing tool
Please advise me to install new balancer
Thank you
Vic
 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Victor:  On the low horsepower (hydraulic lifter engines), the harmonic balancer is a press fit on the crankshaft nose.  To install the replacement harmonic balancer, carefully orient it on the crankshaft keyway and hammer it on using a small sledge hammer and a block of soft metal, i.e. aluminum, to avoid damage to the front face of the new balancer.  If the engine is in the car, there isn't a lot of room to swing the hammer.  Whenever rebuilding a low horsepower engine it is advised to have the crankshaft drilled and tapped for a bolt to help in installing the balancer as well as keeping it from working its way off the crankshaft snout during use.  Also, if this is a fresh engine, be sure to install the spacer on the crankshaft before installing the balancer.  The spacer spaces the harmonic balancer out by the thickness of the front engine mount crossmember so the  generator and water pump belt will be in alignment.  Corvette Central illustrates the
 installation of this spacer in their catalog as part number 301120.  They also sell a harmonic balancer bolt kit.  I don't recall what the size of the bolt is.

Larry Pearson

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 
I am Michael from Germany. I restore my Corvette 1960. As I build a original engine 283 I am also searching for a correct transmission 4 Speed.
Can you please help me and say to me if this BW T 10
 
http://www.ebay.de/itm/291543776971?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
 
is correct and and I can buy it??? Shure that I need the Hurst 4 Speed Shifter Kit too.  It will be very very very delightful if you can help me!!!!!  Thanks a lot and have a nice day!!!  Attached you can see the newest photo from my engine after painting it 1 week ago.
 
Best regards
 
Michael

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Michael,
 
A Borg-Warner T-10 transmission is correct for your 1960 Corvette. The unit shown in the e-bay link was built in Feb 1959 and therefore a little early to be "Correct" for your car but, if as advertised, would certainly look original.
If your car currently has a 3-speed or no transmission at all, you will need a complete B-W shifter kit including shifter rods, shift links & clips. A correct shifter would have the reverse lock-out T-handle.
 
A Hurst shifter would not be correct for your car but would work OK.
If you go the Hurst route, it still requires the Borg-Warner linkage kit, NOT a Muncie kit.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC  

**********

My 62 has a wire coming out of the trunk latch. Did 62 have an option for electric trunk release?

Thanks

Paul

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Absolutely not.

(Note from website editor - Those type of trunk releases are a more
recent innovation.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I just completed the restoration of  my 59 Corvette and have  a question. The top is
 installed and fits the body great. The problem is putting it into the storage well. It hits on the rear corners and one
 side is so bad that the well cover sits up a couple inches. I don't want to change the top frame adjustments which
 will make the frame not fit the side windows. So what should I do? I  push and push the top down,
 tried folding the material every way possible and it still sits high in that corner. Thanks, jack  

           

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

 

The problem you are having is that the major reproduction top supplier (Al Knoch) is using a material that is much thicker (at least twice) than the original material, and that is why it is difficult to compress the folded top into the top compartment.  I still have some scraps of the original material and it is, literally, paper thin.  Al is in a bind on this.  Think about it.  If he were to accurately reproduce the original thin material, then the competition would  compare their heavier material with it and advertise that Al's tops are made of inferior flimsy material, and Al would lose sales of tops.  The only way you could get Al to change would be for NCRS to deduct originality points when judging the tops that are too thick.  Al would love that because then everyone having their cars judged would have to buy a new top. He has done this many times in the past.  His first tops had a sewn in rear window with no logo or date code, the wrong grain and the wrong binding grain.  Gradually, one by one, he fixed these these things and sold a whole lot of tops in the process.  I waited to buy mine until he fixed everything, because I knew what needed fixing.   His current tops look completely correct.  I have tried to get NCRS to fix their judging manuals many times and always got nowhere. 
 
One last point with the reproduction issue, and that is that the original logo and date code were heat stamped into the rear window.  The last tops I bought from Al, the logo and date stamp were cold stamped into the window.  The rear window plastic has a "memory", and after a few years, the logo and $50 date stamp completely disappears!  He will do it right if you insist when you order the top.  It is virtually impossible to remove a top fabric, return it to him, and have him do the logo and date over, and then reinstall the top.  I talked to him about this, and he understands.
 
Your only solution here is to push the top down as hard as you can and then slam the lid.  It helps to do this on a hot day.  Never fold the top down on a cold wintery day, no matter what it is made of (except 100% cloth tops).  The staples will pull out of the tacking strips and the top or rear window may tear.  The main interference is with the ends of the header, and there is no adjustment here.  Do not fool with the top frame adjustments.  Then nothing will fit when you raise the top.
 
Larry Pearson

 

 

**********

How do I install seat cushions for a 1960 corvette on their frame. I don't see any way to attach the seat and back cushions to the frame. The only clip I see on the frame is I think for the seat back cushion but that clip needs something else to hold the seat back cushion on. . Are the cushions bolted on the frame, if so how. Would appreciate any advise, help, comments that would help me get over this hurdle in my restoration. Thanks.

Tom
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tom,
 
Let's start with the basics. The seat backs and bottom cushions are driver or passenger and are symetrically opposite.
To tell the difference, the outside upper edge of each back is trimmed at an angle to clear the deck lid and leave room for the trim tab. Each seat back frame has two integral wire loops that hook over the top of the seat frame. There are two tabs resistence welded to the bottom of the seat frame that hook over and retain the lower integral wire loops on the seat sack. 
Once the back cushions are installed, the bottom cushions are nested into the seat frame with the upholstered side toward the door.
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor:  Tom:  The seat back frames each have two heavy steel loops at the top that hook over the top of the seat frame.  These should be bent as necessary to make a tight connection at the top of the frame to minimize rattles. The lower part of the seat backs have two flat steel tabs, each about one inch wide, that are bent up by you, the installer, to secure the bottom part of the seat backs to the seat frame.  These steel tabs are made up of soft steel and can be bent up and down repeatedly without breaking.  But on your car if the tabs are broken off, try securing the bottom of the seat backs to the seat frame using plastic tie wraps, which can be cut off when you want to remove the seat backs.

The seat cushions are held in place by gravity.  They are not bolted or tabbed to the seat frame.  There is a left and a right seat cushion, however, and it is easy to get them reversed.  The outside (facing the doors) of the bottom cushions each have an extension down that helps hide the seat frame from view.

Larry Pearson

 

 

**********

I need to replace all radiator hoses and there is very little room to get at the lower radiator hose clamp at the radiator. Do I need to remove the fan shroud to get at it? If not what is the trick?

Thanks in advance.

Joe


From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor: 
Although GM did provide an access notch in the lower two piece fan shroud it is practically impossible to loosen the lower hose and hose clamp with everything still in place.  You will save yourself much time and effort by removing the upper and lower fan shrouds to accomplish this task.  Good luck with this project.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

put new  dash pad in 61corvette but I did not take  apart  need  diagram to help  put lites  in speedo  and  gauges back together   thanks 

tom

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Tom: If you don't have it, you need to purchase a copy of Chevrolet publication ST-12, Corvette Servicing Guide.  This is the only official Chevrolet shop manual for the 1953-1962 Corvettes.  It should be easily obtainable from the major Corvette part suppliers.  The chassis wiring diagram for the 1961-62 Corvettes is shown on page 12-14.  The instrument lights are identified by the color of the wires going to the plug-in lamp sockets.  The colors are as follows:
     Dark Blue:  Right turn signal lamp
     Light Green:  High beam indicator lamp
     Light Blue:  Left turn signal lamp
     Tan:  Hand brake warning lamp.  This was sometimes an optional feature.  The lamp bulb is a special flashing type.
     Gray:  all the same instrument panel lights.   Two go to the speedometer housing;  one goes to the oil pressure/ammeter gauge housing;  one goes to the temperature/gasoline  gauge housing;  one goes to the clock in the center console;  one goes to the tachometer.

Make certain that the main instrument panel ground wire is connected to the left rear upper rocker arm cover screw.  It is a black with white trace 14-gauge wire.  On C1 Corvettes the engine block, not the frame, is the ground source for all the electrical systems on the car.  This wire must be there!!!  Remember, on Corvette the body is made of fiberglass and does not conduct electricity.  All lights and electrical devices must get their ground return from the engine block, which is connected to the battery negative terminal via a starter mounting bolt.  The Corvette electrical systems gets their power from a 12 Gauge red wire that connects to the center lug on the starter solenoid, which connects to the car battery positive terminal.

Larry Pearson

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tom,
 
First purchase after we buy an old Corvette is (or should be) an Assembly Manual.
Most Corvette parts vendors, including Corvette America, Mid-America, Corvette Central & Paragon Reproductions,
 will sell you one for your '61. It will contain all the illustrations you need for this project and more.
 
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC  

 

 

 

**********

I have the emergency brake light on my 61 vette and it has stopped working.  I have tried the wires and it appears to be something inside.  Is there anyone that repairs these since no one makes them new?

Harold

 

 
From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter Advisor: 

Assuming all the wires and contacts are good:

There's only 3 things that could not be working in your emergency brake light: the flasher, bulb or switch.
 
If it's the flasher that's the problem, replace it with a regular turn signal flasher.
Which would require rewiring where it connects to the wires.
 
If it's the light itself, you can replace the bulb. If it's the switch on the emergency
brake handle make sure it's making contact. If not, you should be able to "adjust" (bend)
the spring to help it make better contact. (The switch is on the ground side of the circuit)

 
I had to work on my switch recently, cleaning it up and "adjusting" it.
I don't know anyone who could rebuild the light as such.

Bill Preston

 

 

**********

Good morning-
I have a '61 Corvette with the 315 FI engine.  It starts and runs great but when it gets hot it is really hard to get started again. Normally I have to let it sit for 20 to 30 minutes to cool off. Then it starts and runs great again.  I changed the coil, thinkin that the oil inside it was overheating but that hasn't cured it.  Could it be the fuel?  I keep hearing that I need to run leaded fuel.
Thanks
Frank

From: Bill Preston, Red River Chapter Advisor: 

Here are possible solutions we use for the problems caused by using ethanol fuel in our Rochester Fuel Injector and even in carburetors .


 
1. We use 100LL aviation fuel available at our local small airport for about $5 per gallon. It has no ethanol. 
2. We also consult a website www.pure-gas.com or use their phone ap to locate non ethanol gas when travelling. Some of this is lower octane and we have to add an octane booster. (there is no good gas available within 50 miles of us)
3. We bring home non-ethanol fuel in gas cans whenever we are in an area that has it. Non-ethanol fuel can be stored for longer period of time than ethanol fuel.
4. You can take the ethanol out of the fuel. In a clear container add 10% water to ethanol fuel, shake well, let it sit for a few minutes, ethanol will bind to the water and visibly settle to the bottom. Drain ethanol/water off, which leaves non-ethanol gas with a lower octane than the original ethanol fuel. Add octane booster. (You can read complete articles about this on line)
6. We also bought a big expensive 55 gal. barrel of good gas ($10 per gallon) to have at home until we worked out these other solutions. Fortunately we haven't had to buy another one.
7. We have used a product called Sea Foam in each tank of gas used in our carbureted Chevy. Haven't done that with the FI.
8. Contact your legislator and explain to him/her that ethanol costs more to produce than gasoline, everyone gets lower gas mileage out of that stuff and using corn for fuel is causing the price of food to go up because there is more demand for the corn.

 
Bill Preston

From; Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Welcome to the “Club” Frank as gasohol is the culprit which is 10% ethanol.  Ethanol substantially lowers the boiling point of fuel that you currently purchase at your favorite gas station.  Rochester fuel injection units have very small copper fuel lines to each nozzle and copper is great conductor of heat.  What is happening with your car is as the underhood temperature rises the fuel in the spider begins to percolate causing the fuel injection to become overly rich thus stalling at stop signs and signal lights, very poor idling and extremely difficult to restart when hot.  The fuel injection plenum becomes super rich from the percolated fuel in the spider which then fills the plenum with unburned fuel vapors.  Fuel injected cars residing in Southern California and the West Coast in general all suffer this same problem.  The only leaded gas that you can buy is racing fuel which is extremely expensive and short lived in your 16 gallon gas tank.  There is an additive that I have recently become aware of that greatly reduces the percolation problem.  It is manufactured by Torco Oil Company and is called Accelerator.  Accelerator comes in 32 once cans and mixed 1 can to 10 gallons of 91 octane ethanol fuel raises the octane rating 10 full points to 101 and also helps with the percolation problem. We are seeing some encouraging results out here in Southern California where our summertime temperatures readily exceed 100 degrees.  One other “trick” is to immediately open your hood to let out the hot underhood temperatures that lead to percolation of your fuel injection system.  Give this product a try and best of luck.

 

**********

Could you please tell me if I still need the ballast resistor if I replaced my duel point distributor with a mallery  eletronic?      Thanks,  Dan
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  You do not need to run the factory ballast resistor if you have gone to the Mallory electronic distributor BUT be sure you are running 12 volts to it from the ignition switch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

How big of a cheater slick can i put in a stock wheel well of a stock 1962 corvette? thanks Bill

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Seven inches if the wheel off set is zero.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 61 vette and just ordered a new light switch.  In looking at my old switch the plastic piece that goes on the switch which holds all of the wires is broken and very damaged.  I desperately need one of these and have not been able to find one anywhere.  Do you have any suggestions on where I may find one of these?
-Harold
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Harold,
If this was an issue on my car, I would contact Lectric Limited directly. www.lectriclimited.com
Ask them if the just the plastic connector for the wiring harness they make is available.
Lectric Limited makes the complete wiring harness that can be purchased from most Corvette parts vendors.
 
Be very careful in removing the wire terminals from the connector.
Each one has an integral retainer tab that is if broken or badly deformed will make retention in the connector block difficult.  
 
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

From Gary, trying to buy a 1960, could a low vin 100300 have the vin on the door pillar or were they all on the steering column, also is there any way to trace back on these 12 digit vins, do you know if someone would have a picture of the vin frame location or possibly some reference points.
 
                                                                                             thanks Gary

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Gary
 
1960 Corvette vin tag was located on the driver door jam until aprox serial # 3000. After that it was spot welded to the steering column in the engine compartment.
 
Don't know what you mean by tracing back the vin, but your car is the 300th 1960 built with a build date of 9-16-59.
 
The vin is stamped twice on the top of the drivers side outside frame rail in the area aprox below the seat cushion. Using sandpaper, light and mirror you may be able to read it. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

Does someone have pictures on how the dash wiring is routed with the clips that hold the wiring harness?

-Athur

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Consult the 1962 assembly manual section 12, sheets 4.00, 6.00 and 12.00. Not great, but it's the best we have.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi
I am restoring a 1960 corvette for a friend of mine and was wondering how to remove the 4 tumblers in the glove box lock cylinder? I need to code the key to make new keys. The guy that owned this car before him matched the ign key to the doors! The doors,trunk and glove box have the same keys. All of those are keyed wrong also. The only way I can get the right key code is from the glove box lock. How do I get the tumblers out of the lock cylinder that seemed to be punched on both sides of the tumblers inside the lock cylinder?  The code on the lock cylinder is 8591. Went to a dealer and he gave me a no.out of the code book  but not the last no. 55533? Is the last no. a 2 or 3? And do I need only 4no.s or 6?  Please help me if you can.  Not sure if my friend is a member or not. Thnks.  Gary

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Gary,
 
I find your question a bit confusing so let me start this way. All C-1 Corvettes had one key which fit the ignition, glove box, doors and trunk. The lock codes were 4 numbers.
 
I sounds to me like the glove box and trunk need to be matched to the ignition and doors. I suggest you send the glove box and trunk locks along with your ignition key to Jessers Classic Keys 330-376-8181 to see if he can match everything up for you. You may find the original code on the ignition and door locks. Might be 8591, might not.
 
Sorry if I didn't understand your question correctly.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

My name is George. I am a member of SACC and have been for many 
years. I own a
1960 Corvette with a soft top and a hardtop. Recently, I 
had a new soft top
installed and now I am having a great deal of 
problems having the top lowered
far enough into the rear compartment to 
close the top lid! It was always a
tight fit before but now I am nearly 
damaging the soft top when I try to close
the lid. Is there a way to get 
the soft top LOWER into the rear compartment to
be able to close the lid 
easily? I've owned this car for 30 years and there's
always some 
adjusting to do to fix a problem. My 1957 Chevy Convertible top
has an 
instruction sheet that tells you to fold-in, or pull-out, the top
cover, 
BETWEEN top bows, as you lower, then fold over the top on TOP of the

completely lowered top. This procedure compacts the whole top assembly 
so
the top will fit completely in the rear compartment. The 1960 
Corvette rear
compartment space is crazy-small, compared with the '57 
though. With the
latest soft tops, the vinyl material seems a bit more 
STIFF and would seem to
cause more difficulty in trying to FOLD-IN to 
gain more compactness!
Any
suggestions? I am 'game' to learn some new tricks!!
Thanks for anything you can
offer to help!
George
From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  
George,
 
I would take it back to the installer and have him fix it. If that is not an option.............
 
1. remove the seat backs to assess the convertible top frame brackets
 
2. put the top down
 
3. loosen the 4 nuts that hold the frame tension arms to the mounting brackets (the inner brackets)
 
4. gently push each side of the top down into the well. The tension arm brackets should move down and to the rear slightly
 
5. tighten the nuts
 
6. carefully put the top in the up position making sure it doesn't hit the deck lid or anything else on the way up.
 
CAUTION......this adjustment will effect the top frame fit over the side windows, the header fit at the windshield, the rear bow clearance at the deck lid when in the up position as well as the stacking height of the top in the top well. The top frame adjustments should have been completed before the material was installed on the top frame. It is very difficult if not impossible to realign a top frame once the material is in place. Sometimes this fix works, many times it doesn't. Please be aware you may cause more harm than good.
 
Chip Werstein

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter advisor: 

George:  One of my 62's (in 1974) came with the original softop, and it was still useable, so I used it for many years until it finally tore.  When I folded it down into the top compartment, it practically fell into place and the lid was easy to close.  I replaced it with an inexpensive service replacement top that I paid $50 for at the Pomona Swap Meet.  This top is harder to fold down into the compartment, but offers little difficulty in closing the lid.  I do my own convertible top installations.
 
The problem you are having is that the major reproduction top supplier (Al Knoch) is using a material that is much thicker (at least twice) than the original material, and that is why it is difficult to compress the folded top into the top compartment.  I still have some scraps of the original material and it is, literally, paper thin.  Al is in a bind on this.  Think about it.  If he were to accurately reproduce the original thin material, then the competition would  compare their heavier material with it and advertise that Al's tops are made of inferior flimsy material, and Al would lose sales of tops.  The only way you could get Al to change would be for NCRS to deduct originality points when judging the tops that are too thick.  Al would love that because then everyone having their cars judged would have to buy a new top. He has done this many times in the past.  His first tops had a sewn in rear window with no logo or date code, the wrong grain and the wrong binding grain.  Gradually, one by one, he fixed these these things and sold a whole lot of tops in the process.  I waited to buy mine until he fixed everything, because I knew what needed fixing.   His current tops look completely correct.  I have tried to get NCRS to fix their judging manuals many times and always got nowhere. 
 
One last point with the reproduction issue, and that is that the original logo and date code were heat stamped into the rear window.  The last tops I bought from Al, the logo and date stamp were cold stamped into the window.  The rear window plastic has a "memory", and after a few years, the logo and $50 date stamp completely disappears!  He will do it right if you insist when you order the top.  It is virtually impossible to remove a top fabric, return it to him, and have him do the logo and date over, and then reinstall the top.  I talked to him about this, and he understands.
 
Your only solution here is to push the top down as hard as you can and then slam the lid.  It helps to do this on a hot day.  Never fold the top down on a cold wintery day, no matter what it is made of (except 100% cloth tops).  The staples will pull out of the tacking strips and the top or rear window may tear.  The main interference is with the ends of the header, and there is no adjustment here.  Do not fool with the top frame adjustments.  Then nothing will fit when you raise the top.
 
Larry Pearson

 

**********

Dear Sirs:

 I sent in my membership application form and my Money Order in US funds on February 26th and await my documentation.

 My question is: For my 1961 Corvette, what is the correct height from the ground to the top of the wheel wells in both front and back ?

 I want to ensure that the car is riding at the correct height.  I look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks and look forward to my membership.

 David R.
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Section O of the Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12 gives and excellent overview of the Corvette ride heights.  It can be ordered from Helm, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi
 
My name is Ken  and I will soon have my 62 Corvette back from restoration.  We are getting ready for the paint in just a couple of days and I need to know:
 
What color is the under the Hood, Trunk and Convertible Top Compartment supposed to be painted?  I think the hood and trunk are black, but have no idea about the Convertible top's compartment.  Is it Black too or painted the same color as the car's body.  I want my car to look completely stock and have all as original as I can possibly do.  Car was originally and will be Roman Red.  Also, is there a way to trace my cars origin?  I was told this car was originally purchased for James Gardner's (Not James Garner) but a different famous actor's wife as a gift.  I'd like to know if there is anyway to verify that?  Also my car's original motor is gone and the numbers on the 327 in it show it is from 1964.  I was also told that the motor had blown and was replaced under warranty in 1964.  This is the only thing that keeps it from being totally matching numbers.  So if there is a way to verify this, it would help with it's originality as I was told, if I can verify this, it would still be considered numbers matching.
 
I certainly appreciate your help and consideration.  I also plan on joining as soon as I officially have this great car on the road...hopefully by months end.
 
Best Regards,
 
Ken

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Ken,

Congratulations on the near completion of your 1962 Corvette.

Unlike today, in 1962 most new car warranties were for 12 months or 12,000 miles, whichever came first.  Therefore, it's possible but unlikely the warranty covered replacement of a '62 Corvette engine in 1964 (unless the car was not originally sold/titled until 1963).  Sorry, but unless you have documenting paperwork showing this, matching numbers will be almost impossible to substantiate.

Regarding the car's former owners... again unless you have documenting paperwork (copies of the different titles), the car's lineage is almost impossible to prove.  GM does not retain production or sales records this far back.  If you do not have these, the place to start would be to contact the person you purchased the car from and see if they retained any documentation.  If not and the car has been registered in the same state for some time, you can use the VIN # to apply for it's history from the state's Department of Transportation, Vehicle Registration Division.  If successful at finding former owner titles, and they have not moved since ownership, you can attempt to contact them, personally.

Paint is an easier question...

In 1962 the underside of the hood (along with entire engine compartment) were painted flat black "Duco" lacquer.

Starting with 1961, the Corvette's folding top and trunk compartments were painted the same as the "primary" exterior body color.  In 1960 and before, they were painted to match the car's interior.

Looking forward to having you join SACC and seeing your completed 1962!

Good Luck!

**********

I HAVE A 61 CORVETTE AND THE CONVERTIBLE TOP IS SAGGING IN THE MIDLE ON THE LEFT SIDE.   The right side is fine and no sagging.   I tried the adjustment on the left side behind the seat and it did not help any.   Suggestions appreciated.

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor: 

The answers I am giving you are illustrated on Figure 72 on page 1-32 of the official Chevrolet shop manual for all C1 Corvettes, Corvette Servicing Guide, Publication ST-12.  If you don't have this publication, I advise you to get a copy from any Corvette parts supplier.
 
The two top side roof rails (front and rear) tie together and pivot with a large slotted head screw in the middle.  The height of this pivot point is controlled by the Link (Rear Control) as illustrated in Figure 72.  To raise this pivot point to make it straight, loosten the two bolts that hold this Link to the bracket that attaches to the large vertical steel support bracket.  Unlatch the top header from the windshield frame (both sides).  Raise the top header about 2 inches above the windshield frame.  Push the pivot point up until it is as straight as you want it.  While holding the pivot point straight, tighten the two bolts that hold the Link to its bracket.  Latch the top header to the windshield frame, if you can.  If it won't latch, shightly loosen the two bolts enough so you can latch the top header to the windshield frame.  Go back and forth until you get it right.
 
Your real problem might be caused by the forward roof rail being bent at the pivot point.  This happens when, due to a lack of lubrication at the point of the large slotted head pivot screw,  the front side rail bends when you try to lower or raise the top.  In extreme cases this forward side rail will actually break in two.  Be careful that this doesn't happen. If it is bent, you may have to remove it to straighten it or weld it if it breaks.  Keep all joints on your top frame lubricated using 30 W engine oil.  Service replacement parts should be available from Corvette Central.
 
Larry Pearson

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Could it be that your windshield is leaning back too far.  If their is a gap between the glass and rubber weather stripping at the bottom of the windshield, your top will not fit either.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

 

 

**********

Here's the deal. I bought a (formerly) auto car for $500 that had been used for drag racing and brought it back from the dead.
Years ago I welded the clutch cross shaft support onto the frame in what thought was the right spot.
I was close.
I have the engine out for it's third rebuild and would like to cut this thing off and put it in the right place.
You may have guessed I'm a backyard guy, but enthusiastic.
Not much on that old beast is original but 188,000 miles will do that to ya.
Thanks for any help.
P.S. I'm not much of a joiner, but I'll give your ORG a look see.
Max

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor: 

maxudog:  I assume that you are trying to convert a Powerglide 1960 Corvette to a 4-speed car and there is nothing there and you are referring to the the measurement given in the Corvette Assembly Instruction Manual (AIM).  The 28.06 inch measurement is from "C/L of Gauge Hole" to the 3723607 Bracket Assy (Frame Bracket).  I don't think that anyone alive knows where this Gauge Hole was.  The factory probably used a jig to locate the Frame Bracket, and no one has that fixture.  So you will have to "eyeball" the location of the Bracket on the frame.  It shouldn't be that hard to do.  Mount the 3723603 Bracket to the bellhousing with two bolts as shown.  Then mount the 3732881 Cross Shaft over the ball on this bracket after placing one 3743307 spacer (a thick felt washer that acts as a seal between the end of the Cross Shaft and the bracket) over the ball.  Then install a second 3743307 spacer over the ball on the Frame Bracket, insert the ball into the other end of the Cross Shaft and set the Frame Bracket on the frame.  Take a carpenter's square and adjust the Frame Bracket as necessary fore or aft so that the Cross Shaft is at right angles to the 3723603 Bracket.  The height of the Frame Bracket is not adjustable.  Mark the location on the frame with a crayon and weld the Frame Bracket in place to the frame. 
 
There is a second much smaller bracket (3723786) that is welded to the frame and acts as an attachment to the frame for the large 3744159 Over Center Assist Spring via a 3720152 hook.  This spring reduces the foot pressure needed to depress the clutch pedal when using a three finger Borg & Beck type pressure plate, which your car came with.  If you are using a diaphgram type pressure plate, this assist spring may not be needed.  The 1963 Corvette went to a diaphgram pressure plate and this assist spring was not used.  This Assist Spring bracket centerline is 5.32 inches back from the Frame Bracket centerline.  Make the measurement and weld the bracket in place as shown in the AIM illustration.
 
All parts should be available from Corvette Central.
 
Larry Pearson

**********

I have a 54 vette and I'm certain the powerglide in it is not the correct one. After purchasing several books for hundreds of dollars and months of research I cannot find the definitive answer as to the correct casting number for a 1954 corvette powerglide. Can you help me with this issue.

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Duke,
   According to my books and my '54, all 1954 Vette's had a cast iron Powerglide cases which was the same as the passenger car except for the shift lever location and the fill pipe length which was much shorter (about 6"). The casting codes all began with a "C" followed by the mo. (1-12) and the day (1-31). Ex.- C II9 is January 19, 1954.
The first about 1,100 Powerglide's were P/N 3709676 and the last about 2,300 were P/N3713604.
Hope this helps,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

**********

Gentlemen,
 
I am not a member of your organization.  However, I am wondering if it is possible to remove the PowerGlide transmission, 1954 Corvette,  without pulling the engine.
 
That is, do you think a transmission shop could do this if the car is put up on a lift ??
 
I know that there is very little clearance for transmission movement down there.
 
My fear is that the vehicle's finish might get damaged if the engine/transmission assembly is pulled as a unit. 
 
I had new seals put in the transmission 15 years ago when the engine & transmission were out of the car.  The car was repainted at the time and has not been driven much since then. 
 
Thanks very much for any information or guidance you can provide.
 
Jim

From: Ken Amrick, SACC Publications Editor:

Are you sure it must be removed?  Sometimes repairs can be made without removing the unit.
Have your shop check it out first because it's a lot of work removing and installing the unit. 
Removing the engine and trans as a unit would be very scary. If all that weight accidently banged into the fiberglass firewall, you would do expensive damage. 
I've removed and replaced the Powerglide transmission on my '55 without removing the engine.  It's been a few years so I don't remember all the details, but I think the exhaust pipes will have to be moved out of the way.  I have a '55 and it's a V8. I don't think that makes a difference though.  The back of the engine will have to be supported, but lowered slightly to get enough clearance. It is a close fit around the X frame, but it will come out.   Ken 

 

**********

Hi,

 I’ve got a 1961 Corvette and want to know the correct color for painting the underside of my hood and trunk lid.

 thank you,

 Rich

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

For the 1961 Corvette, the "hood pannel inside" was to have been painted "flat black Duco (lacquer)". 

 Starring with a small number of late '60 Corvettes and all '61 Corvettes... the entire trunk compartment, as well as underside of trunk lid was painted the same as the car's primary body color.

 This is verified on page 403 of Noland Adams' "The Complete Corvette Restoration & Technical Guide - Vol. 1; 1953 Through 1962"  If you are restoring a 1961 Corvette, this book is well worth the investment.

 Good luck!

 Brad Bean

 

 

**********

Hello,

I'm a new member! I've been waiting for my 1958 front bumpers to come back from the plating shop and I've been going thru the re-installation process and wondering about the bumper grommets. Are the mounting bolts for the bumpers tightened from the underside and then the rubber grommets punched thru the bracket window towards the front of the car? Does the smaller outside dimension of the gasket face the front of the car (to make it easier to push thru and position)? It seems simple but I've been giving this way too much thought...any help would be appreciated!

Thanks, Tom

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal, Chapter Advisor: 

Tom:  The rubber seal that installs in the "bracket window" should be installed over the bumper bracket and the lip on the seal installed into the edge of the fiberglass opening.  The seal has a slit cut into it top to bottom and shorter slits cut on the top and bottom to allow it to easily slip over the bumper bracket.  Install the seal first before attempting to install the bumper bolt through the bumper bracket and into the bumper.  Use your fingers to start the bumper bolt threading into the bumper.  Use an end wrench, preferably one with a ratchening box end, to tighten this bumper bolt.  Before completely tightening this bolt, install the side bolt along with the rubber pad (goes between the bumper and the fiberglass outside surface), the steel spacer sleeve (goes over the bolt from the inside of the fender and ends up sandwiched between the bumper backside and the rear bumper bracket), and steel "U" shims as necessary.  See page 11-5 of the official Chevrolet C1 shop manual Corvette Servicing Guide, publication ST-12, to see how this is done.  The steel spacer sleeve typically rusts away and must be replaced if it is gone.  You can make your own out of steel water pipe or buy a replacement from Corvette Central.  After both bolts are started, tighten them up so that the bumper bar is exactly centered between the fiberglass body extensions above and below it.  I advise you to apply Lubriplate grease on the threads of both bolts before installing them to keep them from rusting in place.
 
Larry Pearson

 

**********

ANY INFO ON THIS SEAT BELT BUCKLE WE TALKED ABOUT A FEW WEEKS AGO?  IT'S OFF A 62--SERIAL # 20867S100540--TO REFRESH--MY QUESTION ,IS THIS BUCKLE WITH THE ROUND RECESS CUT INTO IT CORRECT BECAUSE ALL THE BUCKLE'S I'AM SEEING DO NOT HAVE THIS RECESS CUT,THEY ARE FLAT! -IF IT IS CORRECT  DOES A DECAL GO IN THAT RECESS?----THANKS,MIKE

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,
 
I have never seen a seat belt buckle like the one you have. All 62 Corvettes used a flat buckle and on early cars like yours ( # 540 ) the buckle would have been painted interior color. Corvette Central sells very nice reproduction seat belt assemblies at a reasonable price.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

Good Evening,

I am switching to 205 or 215 radial tires and would like to know what alignment specs. I should go by?

Thanks,

Bill

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

Bill,
 
Use the factory alignment specs for your car on both bias ply and radial tires. I like 215-75-R15 tires on the stock 5" rims. Coker makes wide whites that size in both BF Goodrich and Coker brand. No major manufacturer makes that size today except in an SUV tire. I recently replaced the tires on my 62 and ended up buying 205-75-R15 Goodrich TA Radials and turned the letters in. They were $100 each vs $260 each from Coker. I don't like the size as well because they are about 1.5 inches shorter than the original 670-15's and makes my 3.55 gear feel like 4.11's. But they look good.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

DEAR SIRS, I JUST SENT IN MY MEMBERSHIP FORM AND CHECK LAST WEEK. COULD YOU TELL ME THE GM PART # THAT IS STAMPED ON THE 1962 REAR SHOCKS,  I’ AM GETTING PART # 3197611- IS THIS CORRECT? THANKS, MIKE
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Mike,
 
Original 1962 standard equipment shocks have a stamped part number and date code They are painted gloss black and have smooth bodies....not spiral. Fronts 5552976 and rears 555593. An example date code wood be 4 D 62 which indicates 4th week April, 1962.
 
Chip Werstein 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
My name is Jay and I am in the process redoing the 4 speed shifter on my 1961 Vette. Can you help me find a diagram of the shifter?
Thanks,

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Jay: I looked everywhere and could not find a blow-up illustration showing exactly how all the parts in the shifter go together.  My illustrated 1972 Chevrolet Corvette parts book sold all the pieces that made it up, but did not show an exploded view of all the pieces and how they go together.  It showed arrows pointing to the pieces in a completely assembled shifter.  If you take yours apart, take digital pictures of the pieces coming out so you can get them back in the correct order and orientation. There is no need to take it apart unless you have to.  You can lubricate it from to top with 30W engine oil.  Nobody services all the pieces that make up the shifter body, but Corvette Central sells a complete shifter, less rods, for about $400.  If you can find the source of the reproduction shifter, maybe you can buy individual pieces.  The "T" reverse lockout handle assembly with spring is sold separately by Corvette Central.
 
Corvette Central services the rods that connect to the transmission shifting levers and the anti rattle spring that connects a small stud sticking out the side of the shifter arm to a small bracket secured to the center bolt on the bottom plate that the ball on the bottom of the shifter rod slides in.  One of the problems with this shifter design is shifter "buzz" caused by driveline vibrations and slop caused by wear or missing pieces in the shifter assembly.  To minimize this "buzz", make shure everything is tight and all the anti-rattle devices are in place.  Each of the three shifter rods is secured to its shifter lever with a special spring clip, not a cotter key.  Each shifter rod connects to the transmission levers with a forked end that is secured with a clevis pin and cotter key, and a spring steel "wave washer" in the middle to eliminate rattles at this point.  A big source of shifter "buzz" comes from  wear on the sides of the pivot ball machined on the botton end of the shifter rod.  This ball slides back and forth in a sheet metal channel.  With use, wear develops flat spots on the sides of this ball and this creates side-to-side slop that is a serious source of shifter "buzz".  To take up the wear, I have tried heat shrink tubing on the ball, but it quickly wears out and the noise comes back.  I have found success in carefully bending the sheet metal channel inward to take up the wear, and this works great.  Pack grease in the slot to minimize future wear. Excessive driveline vibrations will cause the shifter to become noisy no matter what you do to the shifter.  A possible source is an out of balance pressure plate, excessively worn transmission rear ball bearing, worn out engine mounts, or an out of balance driveshaft.  Put your hand on the shifter in 4th gear at speed, and if you feel a strong vibration, you need to find the source and fix it.  I have three C1's with original shifters and all the anti rattle devices in place and they shift the transmission prefectly and the shifters are totally quiet at all speeds.
 
The procedure to adjust the length of the three shifter rods going from the shifter to the transmission shifting levers is only found in the passenger car shop manuals.  If you own a 1961 Corvette, you should own the 1961 Chevrolet  Passenger Car Shop Manual, publication number S&M 32.  The Chevrolet passenger cars with 4-speed transmissions used the same basic shifter as Corvette, except with a much longer shifter rod in the car.  The adjustment procedure is found on page 12-29.  It shows a linkage gauge block which, when installed on the top of the shifter, holds the shifter mechanism in neutral so you can work under the car and adjust the length of the shifter rods to the transmission shifting levers.  Dimensions are given and you can make this gauge block up yourself.  I always make these adjustments with the transmission out of the car and you can easily make the adjustments without the need for the gauge block.  Once the adjustments are properly made, there is no need to re-adjust them in the future.
 
Larry Pearson

**********

Good Morning,

The rebound strap is missing on my 1961 corvette.  I am totally renovating this car.  What are the advantages of the rebound strap?  Also where can I find a diagram to properly reinstall this strap?  Thank you for your assistance.

Dave

From Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

David:  From your standpoint, the most important  purpose of the straps is to protect the rear shock absorbers from being damaged should the car's rear wheels leave the ground when going over a large bump at speed.  In this situation, with the straps gone or broken, the rear shock absorbers become hyperextend and can actually break from the force of the rear axle's weight and inertia suddenly trying to extend them to beyond full length.  If the shock absorbers become broken, then the rear axle could drop far enough to cause the driveshaft yoke to disengage from the rear of the transmission!  This situation is a very real possibility for C1 cars using Muncie transmissions and the short yokes available with the fine splines they require.  The straps are actually shorter than they need to be to only protect the rear shock absorbers from damage, and I suspect that limiting rear axle drop on the inside wheel during hard cornering may give some advantage to the car's handling.  These straps were used on all C1 Corvettes, and varied in length over the years.  By 1962 they were the longest at 29.5 inches.  The earlier years were as much as two inches shorter.  When you figure that the strap forms a loop, down and then back up, the difference over the years only amounts to one inch from the frame to the bottom of the axle housing.  What were they trying to prove?  I have never seen this done on sedans.
 
As far as installing them, there are two loops welded on the bottom of each side of the car's frame.  If they are gone on your car, you will have to make something up.  This part is no longer serviced.  The ends of each fabric strap loop over these and attach together using two steel rivets and two small rectangular steel reinforcement plates.  Corvette Central illustrates how this is done in their catalog.  They sell the straps and the plates and the rivets.  NCRS demands that the steel rivets be used or you lose points, but how do you properly compress steel rivets in this location up in the air?  I am told that special tools are available to compress the steel rivets, but I don't think that you need to go to all this trouble to make NCRS happy.  Chevrolet on page 4-5 of their official C1 Corvette shop manual, Corvette Servicing Guide, recommends that you use 1/4 inch bolts and nuts to replace the steel rivets once you drill them out.  Apparently you have nothing at all to remove.  I suggest that you use the bolts.  You can easily do this installation yourself.
 
Larry Pearson

**********

Hello, I’m not a member but hope that you will answer my question.  I have a 59 corvette and understand that a fused wire should be added in at least one area, to the black 12 gauge wire at the solenoid.  If so, should the fused wire be 14 gauge?

 Is fused wire recommended at any other spots and are there other electrical  changes recommended to protect the wiring and car?

 Thanks

 Jerry

 P. S. looked through all of the questions on the website and was surprised that this topic was not mentioned or maybe I missed it.

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

First of all, J & C needs to purchase a copy of Chevrolet's "official" shop manual for all C1's:  Corvette Servicing Guide, publication # ST-12.  Copies of this are available from all Corvette parts suppliers.  The schematic for the 1959 Corvette is found on page 12-13.  The main power feed for all the car's electrical systems (except the power top motor) is a black 12 gauge stranded wire that comes off the large battery terminal on the starter solenoid.  This wire is not fused and goes directly to one lug of the ammeter gauge.  The other terminal of the ammeter feeds the electrical systems in the car.  None of the wiring in a C1 is "fused" wire, whatever that is supposed to be.  All circuits needing to be fused are located in the car's fuse box located on the firewall on the driver's side.  Several circuits use a circuit breaker that automatically resets itself after the fault is corrected:  headlights (part of the headlight switch), power windows (located next to the windshield wiper motor), Power top motor, and windshield wiper motor (built in).
 
J & C need to join SACC.
 
Larry Pearson

 

 

 

**********

I need to replace the hub bolts on My c-1, #100 rear hub.

GM part catalog, Group 5.12,  shows two numbers.
  53-60 (1st design) # 3829376
  60-65 (2nd design) # 3980406
Would the dimensions matter with stock wheels ?


         JOHN

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

John,
 
I doubt there is any physical difference between the 2 studs you listed. Why not simply measure the length of the studs currently in your car and replace them with new studs from your local parts store?
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 
I enjoyed meeting everyone in Carlisle.
I am looking for some guidance on our 1960. I have been chasing a rattle noise and think I found it.
It appears that the first 2 bolts on the front side of the exhaust manifold are missing (on the driver side).Not one but two!
One of these bolts grab a small bracket that holds the shield that protects the spark plug wires. This shield is rattling at certain RPM. Some research shows that these are grade 8. Does anyone know the proper size and if a washer is used? Can I get them at a good hardware store? Any dressing on the threads to prevent loosening? It is a 283 single 4. I had the car in for some work in the spring and am not sure if they forgot to put them back or did not tighten them properly.
 Thanks Rainer   
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Rainer,
 
The bolts are not grade 8 and do not use thread sealer. The bolt heads have two circles on them.....one inside the other. There are 2 spacer washers used on each side of the motor to space the shielding "L" bracket away from the manifold. You can buy all this stuff from Paragon or Corvette Central and while you are at it you should order a 1960 assembly manual.....about $20. It will show you detailed drawings of the shielding as well as every other aspect of the car.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

Changing rear shocks on a 1961 corvette. how do i find access to the upper shock mount nut to remove it? thanks for any info.

Dom

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Chapter Advisor: 

The upper mounting nut on a C-1 rear shock can sometimes be challenging to remove. You can access it only from the bottom of the car on a 61 as it is located on a bracket welded to the cross member over the rear axle. Soak it in penetrating oil. Disconnect the lower shock mount. While holding the nut with a wrench grasp the upper body of the shock and attempt to unscrew it from the nut. This method works great on a S. Calif car, but if the nuts are rusted to the shock stud your only choice my be to break it off or burn it off.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

Hello People
 
I have a 1958 Corvette i have been driving last 35 years
Beginning of this summer i was on the hiway going 60 mph on the right lane and suddenly hit the brakes and found myself on the left lane. The car stopped but instantly pulled me to the left lane.
Since then i changed the wheel cylinders, brake adjusters and left everything else on because all of the springs and the shoes are in good condition and adjusted the brakes to the equal drag on both sides.
But i still have the same trouble as soon as i apply the brakes at high speed it pulls to the left
Would any one have an idea what's going on ?
Thank you very much
Oliver

From: Ken Amrick, Editor of SACC magazine, On Solid Ground: 

There could be numerous reasons why the brakes are pulling to one side, and you already eliminated a few of them. I saw this same problem recently on a 1964 Corvette. It pulled strongly to the left when braking and the owner already tried all the typical causes.   With both front wheels raised enough to spin the wheels by hand, have someone apply light pressure to the brakes.  If one wheel is easier to spin than the other, brake fluid may be flowing into the wheel cylinders at an uneven rate.  I removed the brake hose on the right side and tried blowing through it. I was surprised to find it was so restricted I couldn't blow air through it.  I replaced both brake hoses, and flushed out the old hydraulic fluid. Now it stops nice and smooth again.

 

**********

I recently joined the solid axle club at  Corvettes at Carlisle.  I have not received my membership card or membership number.  However, I would like to know what gauge restoration shops the club members would recommend.  I am in the middle of restoring a 1961 jewel blue corvette.  Your assistance is greatly needed and appreciated.

Thank You,

Dave

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Dave, you might want to check out Clocks by Roger.  His ads appear in most Corvette Publications.  The website is http://www.corvetteclocks.com/.  He restores  gages in all years cars.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Gentlemen,

I recently came across your technical help board, and am impressed with accuracy of your responses and the logic of your advice. Having said this…Even though I’m not a member, I respectfully submit the following question.

I’m in the process of converting my base engine, single 4 barrel, 57 vette, to a 579E engine, injected with a 4520 system.  To complete the process, I need to install the crossed flags and FI badges on each of fender coves and the trunk. Do you know of a source to obtain the dimension to properly mount/locate these emblems?

I appreciate your time and I’m looking forward to your response..
Regards,

Jeff

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  You want to convert your base motor Corvette to a 579E Air Box Corvette which is going to be a very tall order and quite expensive to pull off.  The air box itself is practically nonexistent, you will need a 908 distributor for the tach drive, a 7014520 fuel injection with serial numbers that begin with a “2” and not a “1” as per Ken Kayser fuel injection book, a correctly dated 57 cast iron four speed transmission which are quite rare and very expensive.  The voltage regulator will have to be moved to the passenger side inner fender because of the interference of the air box.  The 579E air cleaner adaptor is a special piece and will have to be hand made up and attached to the rear brake cold air hose.  Like I said “this is a really tall order” and will require the expertise and talents of somebody that knows what they are doing. Real 579E Corvettes also came with RPO 686 Big Brakes.  Only 51 579E Corvettes are known to have been produced.  Member, Chip Werstein, just did a full body off restoration of an Air Box Corvette and could provide you much additional information.  The flags and placement are the easy part.  Best of luck with this project.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi.  I have a 1962 corvette which just started leaking at the center of the rear.   It appears not to be the pinion seal, but rather the mating surface from they carrier to the differential body.  Is this common, any easy fix, or what is the procedure for diagnosis and repair? Thank you.  Matt

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Matt,
 
Pretty much everything 50+ years old will leak somewhere so I don't think this is an uncommon problem. I suggest the following.
 
1. Check the differential filler plug making sure it is tight and not leaking from that area. (Note there is no drain plug on a 62)
 
2. Tighten the 10 nuts which retain the differential to the housing.
 
3. If neither of these solve the leak you will need to remove the differential from the housing and replace the diff to housing gasket. This involves draining the rear end, pulling the rear axles, removing the 10 nuts, removing the differential, cleaning the mating surfaces and reassembly. This is also a good time to check your rear axle seals and rear brakes for any issues.
 
Chip Werstein

 

From:  Mike McCloskey, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Two hour project.  Remove rear tires, brake drums & the 4 bolts retaining each rear axle to the backing plates.  Pull each one out about 3 inches.  Remove 10 housing nuts.  Catch old lube.   Buy axle gaskets & 10 bolt housing gasket & lube.  Remove rear u joint u bolts.  Clean all old gasket surfaces.  Use a good sealer when going back together.  Add lube until level with fill hole.  Good time to change pinion seal too.  Use jack stands.  You can do it.  Mike McCloskey
 

**********

RE;  Upper fan shroud:
 
  1,  I am the fellow, that wrote in about having difficulty installing the upper fan shroud on by 57.  I did unloosen the core support, the front four body bolts( along the firewall), and finally raised the front end to allow the shroud installation.  I have to raise it about a 1/4 of an inch!!!
 
This action now will lead to some re-shimming of the car as the passenger door now needs adjusting.  I could just adjust the strike, but it appears that a shim or two would be a better choice. 
 
Any thoughts on this?
 
2.  One thing that has :bugged" me for many years:
 
The ribbed rubber strips that are placed on the frame prior to re-installing the body to the frame.
 
Were these glued originally?  They seem to fall out from time to time. 
 
3.  A very common appearance issue, is the front hood alignment with the front of the car.  In some cases the hood hinges don't have enough "play" in them to allow the hood to sit in the opening without the front edge of the hood  being higher than the front edge of the  car.  During the restoration of our 56, we adjusted the hood during body work, and raised, (built up), the front of the body so the hood fit perfectly.  Not wanting to over-restore this 57, we did not do that.  Is there play in the body mounting to the core support, that effectively "raises the front of the slightly?  I seem to recall there is little plat with the existing bolt holes where the front of the body is bolted to the core support.   Am I missing something here?  
 
I appreciate all your help!
 
Best regards!
 
 
Bill

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

The screws attaching the inner fenders to the radiator core support as well as the core support to front crossmember need to be loosened to allow the front end to be raised to match the hood profile.
Re-shimming  the body to the frame to match adjacent body lines should be done before moving the door latch. Rubber pads were attached to the top of the frame with yellow weather strip adhesive.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

Hello I just came across your website. I just acquired a 60 vette that's got an original automatic trans , Right now the car is stuck in park, I do not see any kind of release button or safety on the shifter set up, Do you know if there is one hidden or something? I just don't want to force it and break something if I don't know where something is, thanks.

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Allen,
 
You have more issues than one memo can cover.
The most important one is this, go to the local DMV with the widow who you are buying the car from.
Have her request a duplicate title for the car so that you can legally prove ownership by having them transfer title to you. 
Since the car has been tampered with and the VIN tag is missing, it is very possible that whoever stole the hardtop & horn button also may have taken the VIN tag and could well have registered it to another car.  Read Ron Melaragni's  article regarding proving ownership of his 1961 in a recent issue of "On Solid Ground" to help understand what you are facing.

 
Depending on when the 1960 Corvette was built, the VIN tag would either be in the front inside the driver door opening or resistance welded to the top of the steering column just forward of the firewall.
 
I would make sure I could legally own it before spending a lot of $$$$ fixing mechanical issues.
 
Good luck,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

My 62 has the generator on the left side of the engine and the expansion tank on the right side. This appears to be original. I've seen this on other 62's from time to time. Can you tell me what that's all about. Thanks so much

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  I am quite certain that the St.Louis assembly plant did not produce a 1962 Corvette with the generator/expansion tank configuration that you describe on your car.  Probably got somehow rearranged with an engine rebuild or water pump exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Doug Prince is right.  The factory never mounted the generator on the driver's (left) side and the expansion tank on the passenger (right) side in the 1961-2 models.  As explained below, the engine compartment and expansion tank are not configured to do this.
 
The generator mounting bracket is bolted to two bosses on the right side exhaust manifold.  The generator mounted on this bracket is controlled by the voltage regulator mounted on a special shaped pad molded into the right side inner fender fiberglass via a short shielded cable.  To move the generator to the left side, the voltage regulator also has to be moved.  Where do you mount the voltage regulator on the left side?  There is no mounting pad molded into the left side inner fender fiberglass.
 
The radiator expansion tank mounts via a strap type mounting bracket to two bosses on the left side exhaust manifold.  The tank is fed on the bottom elbow via a short 3/4 inch heater hose from a right angle fitting on top of the water pump.  If the tank is moved to the right side, then the elbow fitting on the bottom of the tank will be aimed to the right, away from the water pump.  How do you connect the tank bottom fitting to the water pump top fitting?  Using 2 feet of heater hose?  No.
 

 

Larry Pearson

 

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Could you send me a explosion view of the emerg. Brake handle assy. For 53-54 c1 vette. Please.

Frank

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:

Greetings,
  I could not find an explosion view in my tech books, so here are two photos of my 1954 original parking brake assembly. I hope this helps .
 
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1962 327/340hp corvette that I just purchased to be all original with 26k miles. The shocks are the spiral style shocks, is this correct for 1962? Thanks!

Joey
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Spiral shocks were OEM equipment on 1962 Corvettes and will be dated and painted somewhat gloss black.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*********

I have a 1959 Corvette with a non-matching 283 4brl engine (it’s too slow). I want to replace it with the biggest engine I can fit (without modifications) in the engine compartment. I do want an engine with dual-quads as I love the sound and look. How big can/should I go – 327, 350, 427? I want it to sound “hot rod” and be quick but also look somewhat stock. Thanks,  Sean

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  I believe a 383 will fill the bill and remain very stock appearing if you decide to run cast iron cylinder heads. Plenty of torque and horsepower and I would recommend a roller lifter camshaft for even more performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I am replacing my whitewall 670X15 bias ply tires and stock wheels with radial tires and custom wheels for better handling on my 1958 Corvette, and only using the bias ply for show purposes. I have been told I can use Torquethrust 2 -15X 7 wheels and p225r tires. What I have seen on this tech site is that 15X6 wheels and p205r  tires would be the largest  that would fit. I would like your advice please, thanking you in advance , Bill.

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Bill, the first thing you need to keep in mind with your 58 is that the front suspension is from a 1949 Chevrolet sedan, and is designed for 5 inch wheels and the 6.70x15 tire.  The optional wheel was 5.5 inches.  This is the same wheel that the 1963-7 Stingrays used, but the center hole has to be enlarged slightly to fit over the larger front hubs that C1's used. These wheels do not have the ability to mount the full wheel covers that the 56-62 models used.  Going to 6 and 7 inch wheels with 205 or 215 radial tires is asking for trouble with fender lip breakage and frequent front wheel bearing failure.  Whatever wheel you try to use, the offset must be the same as the stock wheel, or you will place unacceptable loads on the small outer wheel bearing, resulting in frequent failure of this bearing.  This is the case even if you go to replacement tapered roller bearings in place of the stock ball bearings. Basically, the center line of whatever wheel you end up with must be directly over the large inner wheel bearing, which is designed to carry the weight of the vehicle.  Changing the wheel offset, in or out, causes more of the vehicle weight to be borne by the small outer bearing, which it is not designed to do.  The rear axle bearings on C1's are not affected by changes in wheel offset from stock.
The correct radial tire size for your car is 195 75R15.  This size is not common, but it is the only size that works properly on 5 and 5.5 inch wheels.  The 205 and 215 sizes require 6 inch rims to work properly, and these heavy tires cause a high unsprung weight, resulting in a harsh ride.
I will try to forward to you a lengthly analysis on C1 tires I wrote just yesterday.  If you want awsome handling and super wide tires on your ride, sell your 58 and buy a new C7.
 
Larry Pearson

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The Torquethrust Wheels and tires will fit and you will love the look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello I just bought a 1962 corvette, it started for me and ran... As soon as I touched the button on the knob, on the left of steering wheel under the temp gauge, the car died. I can't jump it or start it now ... I was wondering what that button did??? If u can help I'd be greatly appreciated thx...Justin

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:   It is the windshield washer system vacuum button that when pushed operated the windshield washer water to spray and also activated the windshield wipers.  It is quite possible that a prior owner has made this button into a “kill switch” for the engines ignition system.  Verification should be quite easy to do.

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Advisor:  The aluminum button in the center of the windshield wiper knob causes the windshield washer to activate and the windshield wiper motor to activate through a vacuum controlled timer mounted on top of the windshield wiper motor. If you pushed the button and the engine died, I suspect that a defective wiper motor grounded out the ignition at the ballast resistor, causing the engine to die. This may have caused a fuse to blow.
The windshield wiper motor gets its power from the same brown 18-gauge wire that connects to the ignition switch and powers the car's ignition through the ballast resistor located next to the wiper motor. They tie together through a screw connection on one end of the ballast resistor. First, make sure that the screw connection is tight. If it is, loosten the screw and remove the wire going to the wiper motor. Your car should now start and run. If it doesn't, check out the condition of the terminal on the end of the brown wire and make sure that 12 volts appears here when the ignition is turned on. Maybe the wire is broken at the terminal connection. I always felt that 18 gauge is too small for this much of a load with the wiper motor running in addition to the ignition load. Again, check for a blown fuse.
Good luck with this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi

I have a WCFB Carter carb that has been giving me fits.
I had it to National Carb twice and after $200 I still have the same
problem, does not feed enough fuel to get over 48 MPH
I have a steady stream of fuel from the third fuel pump,
gives me a quart in 40 seconds @ 5 lbs pressure.
I do not need to restore this carb just fix it....do you have
a reliable source for this type of repair
Thanks
Larry
Okeechobee FL

From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 
Larry,
 
I have never owned a dual carb set-up but the front carb is the primary and as such, my guess is that your low speed issues would be similar to the operation of the 1X4 Carter WCFB.
 
I had a similar issue with my 230 HP many years ago that turned out to be the accelerator pump in the front of the carb that wasn't lifting the metering rods. No matter how I feathered the gas pedal it wouldn't go over 45 MPH.
The metering rods & their lift linkage were sticking in a rebuilt carb that sat too long.
Cleaning the rods & an accelerator pump kit took care of the issue.
 
Look into joining the Sunshine State Chapte

r and talk to them about references to local shops who may specialize in adjusting & synchronizing dual quads.

 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

I have purchased a 1959 corvette and the speedometer does not work at this time.  The odometer continue to register mileage but the speedometer needle does not move.  Are there some tricks that I can try before removing the speedometer and having it gone through.  I would love not to have to remove the dash and take the speedometer out.  Let me know if you have any ideas.   Kevin

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Other than a little Voodoo there is nothing that I can think of short of pulling the instrument housing out and having the speedometer rebuilt and you should have the tachometer rebuilt at the same time.  Good luck with your project as working upside down is not much fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Yesterday the handle on my hood release cable pulled off. Is there a way to put it back on, in other words how is it attached to the cable? I tried to screw it back on but it pulled back off. Any information on this is much appreciated. I do not want to buy a new repro assembly as I hear they are junk made in China.

Tom

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tom,
 
I had the same thing happen to my car.
Use a small pair of vice grips as an emergency release handle to get the hood up.
Your hood release handle was manufactured as die-cast over a knurled rod so you have a couple choices.
 
1) Push the handle back on using some of the newer two stage plastic weld adhesives on the market.
    Hold the shaft in the handle tightly in place while the adhesive cures.
    Drill a cross-hole as small as possible thru the handle & shaft, press a brad/nail into the hole, snip
    the sharp end off about 1/16 in and peen as a rivet.
Or
 
2) Buy the "correct" replacement that costs $110 instead of $80 for the cheap version.
    Check out Corvette Central P/N 461131 or Paragon Reproductions P/N 13828.
    Both are GM P/N 1990947
 
If you opt for the new cable, make sure you bend the cable wire ends to 30-40 degree angle just past the screw clamps after they are adjusted & tightened . This keeps the clamp from falling off, leaving you unable to open the hood without breaking something.
  
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

DEAR SIRS,

COULD YOU TELL ME THE CORRECT HEAD BOLT MARKING ON A 1962 CORVETTE 327??? THANKS,

MIKE

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,
 
1959-1962 head bolts had a double circle headmark.
Check out Paragon Reproduction P/N 13661K.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,

 My hood front pass side how do I adjust the latch it pops up driving?

Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  When my '54 had the same issue, I noted that the weld at the base of the post to the flange had some play. I had a welder tac weld it in 4 places and it made it rigid and it stayed down. Also, shut down from center, not the side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi
I have a 62 Corvette with a wiring problem. If my light switch is turned to illuminate the dash lights but not so far as to turn on the interior light then the dash lights stay on when the key is off and that draws down the battery. Turning the dimmer light switch completely clockwise (dash lights off) saves the battery. I tried a new switch but that did not fix the problem. I also checked the wiring diagram in my 62 Service Guide and the color codes/ connections appear correct. I saw however that the original and replacement light switch each have 8 possible connection positions but the car has only seven wires (also shown on the wiring diagram). Any suggestions

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Alan,
 
As I understand the function of the light switch,
 
With the knob pushed all the way in, only the courtesy light should turn on after the knob is rotated past the detent. Dash light dimmer function should be inactive because they should not be illuminated.
 
With the knob/shaft pulled out to the first detent position, the dash lights, parking lights , license plate light & tail lights should be on and then the dash light dimmer function should be active.
Rotating the knob should still activate the courtesy light.
 
With the knob/shaft pulled to the second detent position, head lights should be on, parking lights off, dash lights, license plate light & tail lights should be on, dash light dimmer function active.
Rotating the knob should still activate the courtesy light.

 
The light switch function should be independent of the ignition, whether on or off.
 
Operation other than what I have described would indicate to me that either the headlight switch is defective or that something is mis-wired.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

I am trying to replace the trunk springs on my 58 to solve the sagging trunk lid issue but I can not figure how to remove them. After removing the bottom nut the lid can not be raised enough to remove the spring, is there a way to remove the top nut and would that help to remove the spring ?

Thanks,
Mike
 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Yes, cut a slot in flat washers as wide as the trunk spring rods. It will not be real easy, but use a large flat blade screw driver and lift the spring up. Insert a washer, one at a time. This will add tension or strength to the weaken springs. Probably 5 washers to start with. Too many will not allow the trunk lid to close (the spring will not have enough travel to collapse). To my knowledge, currently no one is producing a reproduction spring with enough strength to hold the lid up. It is a larger problem for '58 owners because of the boat straps on the trunk lid.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

**********

I have a 61 vette the motor was rebuilt and a 3/4 cam installed 20 years ago. when this was done an edlebrock intake and a holley 650 carb was installed . the air cleaner , the ingintion shield and the carb and intake were all thrown away.
Motor was built J140 car was built oct 16th 1960. Ok do you know if original ingnition shielding and air filter will fit?
they also changed out the powerglide for a 3 speed 400 but i have the power glide but it needs rebuilt. any idea of what a rebuilt one cost and is mine worth anything as a core or for rebuilding?
thanks
Bud
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The factory air cleaner will not fit on a Holly carburetor….the factory shielding will still fit but I assume that it also has all been thrown away. 1961 was the last year for the cast iron Powerglide transmission. Unless you really, really want to go back to the Powerglide I would recommend that you stick with the current transmission as it is more efficient and less costly to rebuild if need be. Quality transmission rebuilders for the old cast iron Powerglide transmissions are few and far between. Good luck with your project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a friend thinking of purchasing a 1958 Vette. The car is said to be an original Fuel Injected car but is now carburated. The original fuel injection is not available so he would like to know how he can tell if the car is truely an original Fuel Injected car. Someone told me long ago that there a mounting hole, for fuel injected cars only, inside the engine compartment, left inner fender that was for the fuel injection air cleaner. Is that true and is there other ways to identify a fuel injected car?
Also, can you tell me what the tachometer redline should be for all 1958 engine options?
I will be joining the Solid Axle Club as I have a 1959 and a 1962 Corvette and this forum is just what I need.
Thanks,
Dan

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Dan,
Simple questions, complex answers.
All 1958 Corvettes had either 5500 or 6500 RPM redline depending on HP.

5500 RPM tachometer was used for 230 HP base engine & 250 HP fuel injected. Both of these would have been generator drive tachometers.

A 6500 RPM tachometer w/ generator drive would have been used in the 270 HP.

The 6500 RPM tachometer w/ distributor drive was used on 290 HP fuel injected engines.

So, back to your first question, how do you tell if it was really a FI car?
There were 504 cars w/ 250 HP FI & 1007 cars with 290 HP FI and although both are fuel injected,
the distributors, generators and routing of the tachometer cables were different.
Tachometer routing for the 290 HP required a special hole thru the firewall ~halfway between the distributor & the steering column.

In addition to the 2 air cleaner mounting holes (w/ riveted support bracket behind), due to access issues, the WSW reservoir was moved from driver side to the passenger side area just forward of the battery. There should also be screw holes in the left inner fender for attachment of the air cleaner inlet air hose straps.

Good luck to your friend,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

to sacctech


Must the canvas straps around the axle of a 1962 Corvette be in place for shipping on a follow along trailor?

Thank you

Larry

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The canvass straps that you refer to on this 1962 are rebound straps to control the car if it were to go over a significant bump in the road and keeps the rear tires in contact with the road. They have nothing to do with the chains that you refer to as these are in place to keep the car intact with the trailer as it is being towed down the road.

C1s are transported all over the country with the rebound straps in place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,

Can you help with the following

1. Can you recommend tires for this car, with standard 5" rims and body height.
Are there well regarded options for bias ply 670x15 and radials P205/75R15 that you could recommend. Would like to avoid rubbing under fenders

2. For international membership, is it possible to have a reduced annual fee if the magazine is received by email rather than post.

Thank you

Warren from New Zealand

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Warren,

You can put Coker American Classic 205-75R15 tires on your stock rims all the way around to get wider tires, radial performance and a stock appearance all in the same package w/o affecting your speedometer. That's what I would recommend.
They are available from Corvette Central as well as other outlets.

If you really want bias-ply tires, Corvette Central also sells reproduction Firestone, BF Goodrich & US Royal 6.70-15 tires that would be correct for your 1959. (Goodyear bias-ply tires were not available on Corvette until 1961). Just keep in mind that bias-ply tires are more for looks than for driving.

Regarding the overseas dues cost & e-mail of the quarterly club magazine "On Solid Ground", that is above my pay grade but those responsible are aware of your question.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

Website editor's note:  The club's award winning quarterly magazine is in print form only.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  P205/75R15s are perfect for your application which give you the correct ride height….depending on your preference there are many different manufacturers with equally different sidewall appearances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

What are the production quantities for each body color for 1958 Corvettes?
How many 290hp were made?

thanks,

Bob

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bob,

The answer to your questions & more is available in "Corvette Black Book" by author Mike Antonick.
Every Corvette owner needs one. It is updated yearly & can be purchased from any of the major Corvette parts vendors.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
 
I recently purchased the captioned car which is a Top Flight body off restored car.  I have not yet joined your club, but seriously looking into it.  This is Corvette #9 for me, but my first C1....I love it! 
 
My question is with respect to the soft top.  I live in Florida and my vehicle is always parked in the garage.  I keep the soft top securely fastened with both the back latches and front latches, but is it necessary to keep the back latches secured while parked?  When I go for my weekly ten mile drive through the country, I always have the soft top lowered to enjoy the ride.  I want to ensure that I do things correct so any assistance that you can provide would be very much appreciated.  I also heard something about rolling up a towel and putting it into the crease of the plastic window when I lower the top as not to damage the window...is this true or just a myth?
 
Thanks again,
 
Gordon

From: Brad Bean,  Vice President of SACC:  I too live in FL and like to take drives, esp. in the spring and fall. If your top is really taut, some owners like to undo the rear latches, when the car is garaged, to reduce chances of separating at the seams. However, if the top is not too tight and the garage is not temperature controlled, I like to keep the rear latches fastened so the vinyl remains taut and wrinkle free.

No myth regarding the rolled up towel in the crease of the rear window, when in the down position. The clear plastic scratches easily and this helps to minimize the wear. It also keeps the pointed stainless trim tips from penetrating the top when folded. Word of caution... make sure towel is not too thick as to cause stress on the metal frame joints; ovet time this could bend the frame.

I encourage you to join both SACC & the Sunshine State chapter of SACC. Most of these people have forgotten more about these cars than I will ever know.

Enjoy your new purchase!

Brad Bean

**********

Would you know where I might buy a Hardtop shipping box. I would appreciate any info you have.
Thank You
Lee

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Lee,
I would contact http://www.thehardtopshop.com/ or call them at 724-457-0680 for information on the size box required to ship a hardtop. After they fix them, they then ship them all over the USA.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC
 

 

 

 

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Same holds true for "The Glassworks" in the Pittsburg, PA area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 Two more simple questions: it is a fuelie car, but has carb, has a dual point distro not a fuelie one but from what i was told it is part of a GM kit that folks got back in the day to retro the fuel since no one knew how to setup for the changing season here in the east coast. I pulled the wires, they were clear and brittle and can see they were correct lengths and all, but Igot some Napa ones,  and well no power now, they were for sure solid copper wires.   Any ideas where to get the correct ones for a 60 fuel dual point setup?
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Adviser:  Correct length and style of spark plug wires are readily available from Paragon Corvette Reproductions or Corvette Central. These wire sets are manufactured by Electric Limited. 1960 Corvette spark plug wires were not dated. Fuel injected and carburetor Corvettes all used the same spark plug wires.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Wayne,
If you really have a Cascade Green 1960 big brake fuelly, please be very careful that you don't damage it or change anything until you have it professionally appraised.

As for spark plug wires for it, all 1960 Corvettes used the same wires regardless of horsepower.
They should be available from any of the major Corvette parts vendors to get GM Restoration Parts.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

**********

How does one remove the 3 side spears. also does anyone know if any of the backer place for all three, the visible one was ever chrome? I have a set on know that are painted over and well they are chrome underneath...

Looks like the wheel well cover may need to be unbolted and rich up in there? I can see the 3 long end nuts....

thank you
Wayne

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Wayne,

If you are referring to the three horizontal side spears in the cove, the speed nuts that fasten them are located behind the kick panels inside the car.
What you are seeing behind the splash pan are the speed nuts that fasten the crossed-flag emblems.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

**********

Missing Cover: I'm doing my first oil change on my recently acquired 1959 and upon removal of the oil filter I noticed there is no cover over the flywheel (picture attached). This appears to be the "flywheel housing extension". Are these known to fall off? I'm concerned that I may have driven without this in place and allowed debris to enter the housing. What would you recommend I should do to be sure I won't damage anything if I just replace the cover? Can you point me to the right size bolts for installing a new one and any other tips you might want to add such as proper seals, gaskets etc.? Thanks!
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Adviser:  No gaskets are required and the piece is available from any of the large restoration stores. You will have to remove the starter as this shield gets sandwiched between the starter housing and the bell housing. It is attached by four ¼ x 20 recessed hex head bolts with a captured external lock washer. These are the same style bolts that attach the oil pan to the engine and also available from reproduction sources. The picture indicates that your Corvette’s engine oil filter has been converted to a “spin on style.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

I'm putting a little '60 Vette back together and I was installin a new throwout bearing tonight and couldn't get the fork back on right. Is there a trick to it. The fork doesn't have enough play to slip past the rounded knob that the clip is supposed to hold on to.   Randy

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter Advisor:  Randy,

How did you get the clutch fork out ?? Whatever you did, try the reverse on re-assembly.

If that doesn't work, try backing the clutch fork pivot ball stud out of the bell housing to see if it will give you the clearance to install the fork, then re-torque. Otherwise, .............

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I own an original '67 big block that I have owned since I got out of high school in 1970, however my problem is with my wife's 1960, which she drives regularly in the summer. I gave her the car as a wedding gift 33 years ago.
It is a 3 speed.
Problem was last year or so the clutch wasn't disengaging properly, and you would get grinding going first to 2nd and 2nd to 3rd. The pedal was at the top and no adjustment left.
I put in a new clutch, pressure plate and throw out bearing, which were all the same size as the ones i replaced, unfortunately I can't get enough adjustment.
If I adjust the clutch rod so I get pedal then the throw out bearing rests right on the pressure plate( I know this is a no no), if I adjust so bearing is off the pressure plate I don't get enough clutch to shift properly. The grommet where the pedal rod hooks up was worn out so I turned down an insert to tighten this area up, it didn't seem like this grommet could add that much to the clutch adjustment.
The pedal/clutch is all the way at the end of the pedal.
 Obviously something is wrong but I don't know what.
Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks:

Paul
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Paul,
If your wife has been driving this car summers for 33 years, take another good look at the wear & elongated holes In all the clutch linkages. 
Inspect the clutch fork ball in the bell housing, the clutch fork where it contacts the ball, the holes where the push rod attaches to the fork, the pin hole in the push rod, the push rod pin and both pivot balls for the Z bracket. While you are giving it the attention it needs, you might want to add a grease fitting to the Z bracket tube and some felt packing around the pivot balls to keep the grease contained. 
 
Taking all the slack out of the system and proper lubrication should increase the adjustment available. 
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC


**********

Looking for info on what was the power train that came with my '60.
ref:Serial #100. I know is was a 283, but at what level?
The 1st owner, I have His name (*), bought the Vette 24 Dec. 1959.
Nice Christmas gift for someone !!

Also would like to find out how many owned My Vette before Me.
I may be the 4th ?
 JOHN
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter: 

John,
As one of our newest members, welcome to SACC.
 
VIN #00867S100100 tells us nothing except that it is the 100th 1960 Corvette built in St Louis.
Any additional information has to be determined from studying the car itself.
 
You have to look for clues as to which RPO's were installed in the car originally.
Things like which tachometer, WSW reservoir location, mounting holes under the hood with nothing attached, generator, starter & distributor P/N's.
Your car is early enough that it should have a copper/brass radiator regardless of engine option but it may have a 4 blade fan or a 5 blade clutched fan. 
They are all important clues as to the original engine, if it was replaced.
If it is original, the engine # will tell you what it is.
 
Regarding previous owners, check with your state DMV.
In Michigan, they will check the records for $15-$20 a name.
 
Good luck with your search,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

How to install speedometer cable in 1959 corvette . Thank you

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ron,
 
I'm going to make an assumption here that you already disconnected the transmission end of the speedometer cable casing and unsuccessfully tried to pull the cable out.
There is a collar around the cable in the small ferrule at the end attached to the speedometer that keeps the cable properly located in the cable housing.
To replace the cable, disconnect the small ferrule from the back of the speedometer, note/document how the speedometer cable assembly is routed under the instrument cluster and thru the firewall, then pull it out. SAVE THE GROMMET, you may need it later.
Also note the cable assembly routing from the firewall down to the transmission, then remove it.
 
Replace it with the correct length replacement assembly that can be purchased from most Corvette parts vendors. '59s are steel case with different lengths depending on whether the car has 3 speed,
4 speed T-10, 4 speed Muncie, or Powerglide transmission.
Be sure the new cable is properly lubed.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

Thanks , but my problem is that I can't get my hand under the dash to disconnect the speedometer cable .

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ron,
 
Sure you (or your mechanic) can.
Get a light, lay on your back with your head directly under the instrument cluster and look for the access that allows your fingers to turn the knurled ferrule nut.
You may have to push some wiring out of the way but I've done it dozens of times since 1968.
Lay a piece of cardboard over the lower seat frame so you don't tear your shirt or your back on the seat track attachment screw sticking up out of the frame.
 
Good luck.
Bill Huffman  
 

 

 

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Dear Sir,

Firstly I would like to confirm my desire to become a member of the solid axle corvette club and would like to know how I can do this.

 I am from western Australia and have just stumbled across the club in conversation with someone.

I have 4 corvettes, including a 1960 270HP corvette and would like to know which configuration my aluminium tank top radiator would have come in to confirm my car is correct. My Vin number is 00867S101617 and the engine number is dated F1208CU, which is December, so I am assuming my car is an early car produced in around January 1960? Hoping you can confirm this as well.

I am wondering if my car would have had the ribbed tank top with the sight hole or if it would have had the flat tank top with no sight hole. I would like to get confirmation so I can ensure this is correct as the car has been subject to a body off restoration and is in extremely nice condition. It may be that both types may have been in use at this time, but that is not clearly documented anywhere I have tried to find this information.

I am planning a holiday to the USA and need to place my order by tomorrow, so if I can get a response to this query, it would be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks in advance for your help.

 John

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

John,
 
Welcome to the Solid Axle Corvette Club.
Joining is as easy as clicking on the Membership & Application link (the 4th link above Technical Help), filling it out and sending it and a check to the address noted.

Your engine number indicated a 270 HP Corvette engine assembled in Flint on 8 Dec 1959.
It must have been built early and shipped fast because VIN # 00867S101617 is a car built in St Louis early in the second week of December. First Dec build was #1454 and last was #2059.
 
I can't answer your question regarding the tank top.
Both my '60s are early & both have copper/brass radiators.
However, because of where it is located and since there are not many old Corvettes in Australia, unless you imported it recently, I would assume that if it fits and appears original, it probably is.
The November/December/January time period had several changes going on.
   Transition from all copper to Copper or aluminum, based on application.
   Transition of VIN plate from driver door jam to steering column.
   Transition from engine number like yours to one incorporating the last digits of VIN #. 
As a consequence, stuff happened.
 
Good luck with your restoration,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

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Hi,

 I have a 1954 corvette in need of a top is pinpoint vinyle the correct type?

 Thanks,

Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Bob,
   No, the correct top is beige canvas. It can be found and purchased in Texas at  alknochinteriors.com

 

Bruce Fuhrman 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a 1960 corvette but it has 1961 sill plates.  I am going to install the correct sill plates but the old holes for the small step plate are not visible.  How do I correctly position the small step sill plate since no old holes are visible?  Woodge

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Woodge,
 
Lift & remove the seat cushions and the seat backs from the seat frames and set them aside.
That will give you access to the underside of where the small dimpled step plates are mounted.
Depending how the holes were filled, you may find hardened filler stalactites hanging down below the surface. This is exactly the same thing you would be looking for to find cove moulding holes that somebody had filled in on the door.
You may be able to use the seat frame a fulcrum to force the filler up out of the filled holes in the fiberglass. Or, you may have to remove the seat frame to get better access.   
The filler doesn't have to be pushed up out of the holes, just enough to show where they are located.
Then use a really small diameter punch, so you don't enlarge the holes, to drive the filler down thru.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

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Good Morning Sirs: My 1961 is being repainted following an accident and the painter wants to know if the inside of the trunk was originally black, or speckled. Could you please advise if it was speckled, was it light, medium or dark grey and if possible what the paint code was. Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have or to let me know how I may be of service. I look forward to hearing from you.
Regards, David

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  David

All 1961 Corvette trunks ( and the trunk lid bottom as well as the convertible top well and deck lid bottom) were painted body color. Note that the paint in these areas was not as glossy as the body because the factory prep was not very good nor were these areas polished out.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello
Can the radiator in a 1962 Corvette be removed without removing the fan shroud?
Thank you for any help you can give me.
Best regards,
Bob

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor: 

Bob,
 
In my experience, the radiator can not be removed without removing the fan shroud because it is almost impossible to access the lower hose for removal ( and re installation) from the radiator. In addition, the outlet at the bottom of the radiator will not clear the right lower portion of the shroud unless you modify/cut it. I always take the hood off too just to make access easier.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

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I just recently found your site and posted a question which you answered in just one day.  The solution offered did the trick. I wanted to say thanks and let you know I have sent my membership app in.  Honest the check is in the mail!
I now have another question which I would like some help on.  The 62 vett that I own, I believe it to be a numbers matched car, iIt still has the serial number plat riveted to the column , it matches the block number along with the transmission number etc, etc. My problem is I just can’t find out much about the car.  I purchased it about 21 years ago while in California from a very well known vet. dealer (they are still in business) with the original black plates on it.  I had it shipped back east and at the time was to ignorant to ask for any documentation, I just wanted to get it back and drive it.  I would like to learn more about it but don’t really know where to start to do my home work.  The serial number is 20867S101111.

Any suggestions on how to go about finding more about the car?
Curious George


PS Thanks to all who contribute to this site. You are a wonderful resource .
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

George,
 
Since I live in California I will try to answer your question. California DMV keeps records on cars for only about 3 years after they are no longer currently registered in Ca. So unless your car is still registered in Ca. on the black plates DMV will be no help.......and even if it was the records would probably show only your name going back a few years.
 
I would suggest contacting the dealer .......they may be able to help. Also, I would place ads in the NCRS Driveline, On Solid Ground and the S. California SACC newsletter The Solid Scoop under info wanted with a good description of the car and details of the purchase. It has only been 21 years........someone is likely to remember your car.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

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Hi ,
 
 Is the tach cable for a 1961 black or grey? All the reproduction suppliers list it as being grey. All the pictures I've seen of original engine compartments the cable sure looks like it's black.
 
My rear axle housing appears to be original (has mounts for strut rods, etc.). The casting numbers are L 561, 3725899, GM with a T over a 2. The casting number seems to be correct, it is non-posi. The date appears to be December 5th, 1961. My car is a late 61, 110063. The stamped code looks like BB1221. The first B is very faint, but the second B is very legible. The 1221 I believe is December 21st. But the BB doesn't seem close to any axle codes for 61s or 62s. Any help would be appreciated.
 
Thanks, Mike

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,
 
According to the NCRS 1961-62 judging manual, all 61 tach cables for non FI motors were black vinyl covered and driven off the generator.. FI tach cables were steel cased and driven off the distributor.
 
The read end you have is not original to your car. Based on your info, it came from a 1961 passenger car. BB indicates V8, 3 speed or 6 cyl, powerglide...........3.36 ratio, non posi.
 
Regarding the dates on the rear end......your 61 was built on June 28 so the casting date should be May or early June 1961 with an assembly date in the first half of June. Of course there are exceptions to this, but if you look for a correctly dated rear end, this is a good guideline to follow.
 

 

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I have a 59 all original Vet but I am not sure where to look
for the engine number,  I have manifold numbers but I do not
think they have a value.
Thanks
Larry

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Larry,
 
The engine number should be F(Flint) Mo & Day of assembly (ex. 1023 for Oct 23) plus two letter suffix (CQ,CR,CS,CT,CU, DG) depending on HP & transmission option.
Corvettes engines were not stamped with the VIN number until mid-1960 model year.
 
This number can be found on the stamp pad at the front of the engine just forward of the passenger side head. It may be hidden under the fuel pump to carburetor fuel line.
 
The intake part number & date code are important if your car is really "original".
The part number should match the HP application noted in the engine code and the casting date code (A thru L for Jan-Dec and numerical date, 1-31) must pre-date the car manufacturing date.
 
 
Good luck with your investigation,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

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I have a 1960 with dual quads, 245 Hp engine.  I bought it about 7 years ago and I do not know the history of the car.  Ever since I purchased the car it would overheat when I drove it with external temps much above 85 degrees.  Below that external temperature the engine temp would run above 180 degrees, probably 195 or so.  On warm days I can let it idle in the driveway and the engine temp will continue to climb.   I checked all of the usual things, fluid levels, coolant mix, I flushed the system, did a pressure check, changed the thermostat and nothing seems to help.  I checked the sender and temp gauge with my IR temp meter and they appear to be accurate.  Also, you can watch the temperature gauge and it will climb to 180 degrees (the temp of the thermostat) and it will hold there for a while and then it will begin to slowly climb.  I know that it is either an air flow or a water flow problem. 

 The water pump had a slight leak, so I decided to change that.  I am in the process of buying a matching numbers water pump but there is an issue there.  The pump that I took off was not a matching numbers pump, it was an aftermarket pump and it had been rebuilt.  On that pump, the distance from the pulley hub flange to the mounting surface of the pump was 5 5/8 inches.  The matching numbers pump that I received had a dimension of 5 ¾ inches, so the pulleys did not line up.  I did a little research and from what I can find, this dimension should be 5 5/8 like the one that I took off.  Is this correct?

 I am also addressing the air flow issue as well.  I read in the Corvette forums that overheating is a common problem.  Some people have improved it by eliminating the gaps between the radiator and fan shroud.  I have sealed that up by flattening a length of 5/8 inch heater hose and pushing it in the gap between the shroud and the radiator (this actually looks like it belongs there) and I have blocked off the square hole on the lower right fan shroud.  Now more of the air that the fan draws should flow through the radiator.  I am still waiting for the water pump before I can tell if I have improved the situation.

 I am thinking of the next step if this does not solve the problem.  This engine has the 4 blade fan directly mounted to the water pump pulley.  I noticed that there are two versions of the 4 blade fan, one up to ’57 and one after ’57.  I am not sure which one I have, how can I tell which one I have and what is the difference between these two?  Would this be part of the problem if I had the wrong one?  Should I consider switching to the 5 blade fan with the fan clutch?

 Thanks for any help that you can provide.

 Don

There is one more question that I forgot to ask that I hope you can pass along.  My car has the “conventional” copper brass radiator like the one shown below.  I am finding conflicting  information with regards to what radiator cap should be used, a 7 Lb. or 13 Lb.  The car came with a 7 Lb. cap, changing to the 13 Lb. cap did not change the overheating problem.

 Thanks,

Don

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Don,
It's good that you asked the second question because that would have been my first question back to you.  1960's came with both copper & aluminum.
Early ones appear to be all copper while later ones had copper for 230 HP base engine & aluminum w/ overflow tank for 245, 270 & 290 HP engines.
 
Copper radiator should have the 7 psi cap and all engines had a 170 degree thermostat.
The 13 psi cap would cause the engine to run a little warmer due to the pressure differential.
 
The 230 HP base engine had a 4 blade fan that was riveted.
The 245, 270 & 290 HP engines had 5 blade clutched fans.
 
Regarding the correct length for the water pump shaft, I would address that question to either
John Pirkle at Masters City Corvette Parts in Augusta, GA or Ron Burke at ChevyCool in Scottsdale, AZ.
That's what they do for a living and they both do it well.
 
Regarding the 5/8 hose between radiator & shroud, a properly installed shroud shouldn't  have that much clearance. However, in early Dec 1959 , at approx. VIN #1600, they added weather strip to the front underside of the hood to seal off airflow between the hood & the radiator. Adding that (and all the other radiator seals that are supposed to be there) would certainly help.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

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Hi
I have a 62 corvette with a rear light problem. Changing the signal light position turns on and off the brake lights when I hold the brake down. I can find a position about mid way between up and down on the turn signal when the brake lights work and another slightly up or down where just the drivers side works. When either signal side is active the brake on that side is off (not sure if that is the way it was designed to work). I have done the following without success : replaced the rear wiring harness, replaced the turn signal harness (twice), ran separate ground wire for the rear harness,and ran a separated fuel tank ground wire. I only succeeded in stopping my fuel Gage movement when the lights were activated.

 Thanks for your Help

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  This is a frequent problem with C1 Corvettes although most of my experience has been with 58-62s.  The first area of concern is usually the turn signal harness as all electrical to the rear of the car runs through this switch with the exception of the gas tank sender.  You have an all too typical grounding problem since you have already replaced the turn signal switch and the rear harness.  Your problem probably lies with the rear tail light socket to housing ground as this connection becomes corroded overtime.  I drill a very small hole between the tail light housing where it meets the tail light socket and screw in a small sheet metal screw between the two.  This will create a proper ground for the tail light housing and the tail light socket.  Since we are dealing with a fiberglass car grounds are very important for proper electrical function.  Good luck with this problem but this should solve it for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Alan,
 
Although grounding could be a problem, my guess is that your canceling cam assembly is worn out ( you did not indicate that you replaced it) and/or your turn signal cup is loose.
 
Chip Werstein 

 

 

 

 

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I think I need to rebuild my steering box.

My first concern is what are the steps I need to take to remove the steering box?

 

Jack

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  All C1 owners should a have copy of the Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12 on hand at all times.  Chapter 9 gives a very complete detail of servicing the C1 steering box and how to remove and install the unit.  Good luck with this project as all the rebuild components are available from the Corvette reproduction parts suppliers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello gentlemen!                                                                                     5/15/14
 
I have a 57 Corvette.  I have owned it since 1977!  The fan should was missing so I ordered one from Paragon.
It will not install properly.  When you view the photos in Nolan Adams' Corvette Restoration book, , it is noted that the upper shroud was installed to the lower shroud before the body drop.
 
This replacement shroud will not install as it should.  So............my question is this:  Should I loosen all the body bolts again to raise the car up enough so that the upper shroud bolts correctly to the core support, or am I missing something?  I hate to re shim the whole car again, just to get the upper shroud to fit.
 
Thanks for all your help!!!
 
 
Bill

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bill,
 
If I understand your question correctly, you bought a 20 year old previously wrecked 1957 Corvette that didn't have a fan shroud assembly but was "drivable". 30 some years later you decided to do a frame off restoration.   The body is now re-bolted tightly to the frame and in trying to complete the car, the fan shroud won't bolt up.
 
Simple question, complicated answer.
 
The body from firewall rearward is supported by the frame.
Shimming is to minimize body twist so the doors, deck lid & trunk are supported and fit correctly.
 
The body from firewall forward is supported by the radiator support which is supported by the front crossmember. The fan shroud actually defines the angle between the radiator support and the front horns of the frame.
 
The hood hinges attach directly to the radiator support. That, within the hinges adjustment limits, 
determines the hood height & position. The front end can be raised or lowered to match the body height to the front of the hood. 
 
If the doors, deck lid and trunk open & close properly and the edges are uniform, leave the body bolts/shims as is.  If not, loosen them for re-shimming later.
 
Remove the hood.
 
Loosen the two radiator support to front crossmember bolts.
 
Loosen the radiator support to inner fender bolts on each side.
  (They should have a large fender washer under the bolt head)
 
Loosely attach all the fan shroud attachment hardware.
 
After all the fasteners are installed,
start re-assembly by tightening the fan shroud to both the frame & radiator support.
Reattach the hood.
Raise the front end to match the hood and re-tighten the inner fender attaching bolts.
 
Retighten the radiator support to front crossmember bolts.
(NOTE- some re-shimming may be required between radiator support & front crossmember) 
 
If it still won't line up, there may be frame distortion from a previous accident that never got fixed.
It's possible that's why your car didn't have a fan shroud when you bought it.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

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Hi I was wondering if you happen to know where I can get a gasket rebuild kit for the original 3 speed transmission that came with a 1961 base model (230hp). I found the rebuild kits for the 4 speed but not for the 3 speed. Thank you!

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ryan,

If you haven't already done so, call (instead of looking in the catalog) the usual Corvette parts vendors and ask for a Saginaw 3 speed manual rebuild kit. Low volume items are not always in the catalog.

If Corvette Central, Paragon Reproductions, Chicago Corvette or 4 Speeds by Darrell in Vermillion, IL can't get you one, try a local  transmission repair shop or Chevy dealer. If you brought it in for repair, they would find you one.

The question I have for you is, do you really drive a car with a non-synchromesh 1st gear?  The reason parts are hard to find is that most owners convert them to 4 speed for drivability. Unless you have an absolutely original museum car, value should not be adversely affected by making it easier to drive.

Good luck in your search,                                                                                                                            Bill Huffman,                                                                                                                                                  President,  Michigan Chapter SACC

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Hello:

I am trying to replace the front brake drums on my 58, but they will not separate from the hub. The corvette servicing guide says the drum is held to the hub by three rivets which must be removed to replace the drum. Are these rivets available and if not where would I go to have them replaced?

Thanks
Mike
 

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,
 
Except for maybe "proving originality" the rivets aren't needed at all.
5 studs & lug nuts hold the drum & hub assembly together.
Not replacing the rivets will have no effect on your car's drivability.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

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Dear SACC,

If the assembly plate is missing to install restored original horns, does it require removing the hood and radiator to access this area to rivet on the assembly plate to the inner skirt fiberglass underbody?

And if I do not want to work with my head upside down, I would also need to remove the motor?

Thank you,

Eric

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  While no job is impossible it is my opinion that life will be much better for you to remove the hood for easier access to your particular problem as space before the radiator is very limited.  Good luck with this impending task at hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Here is the car-1962 was originally a carb car-converted to fuelie in 1987
The injection is a 1961-runs like a top .My question is what is the solenoid on the front of the engine
it has a vacuum line connected to the cranking sensor and vacuum advance. The car starts -will not idle
runs rich. I discounted that solenoid car runs like a top.I know that this is a modification someone placed there.
Is it needed? Should I get rid of it? replace it ? or forget it and drive the car. I think it is connected to a battery cut off
installed as part of an old pager alert security system. The Gentleman I purchased the car from owned it for 27 years
and is just not a mechanic and can not give me any information. The car originally came from California. The car is really
a driver for me-and my hope is it remains in my family for many years. A old love affair and distant dream now my reality
                Any help will  be great I will send pics.
                     John

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor:  The “Achilles Heel” for Rochester fuel injection units from 1958-1963 was the cold start cranking signal valve.  When this valve would fail and not close the fuel injection unit would run extremely rich and not idle.  This valve is currently available either brand new or rebuilt from Jim Thorpe, 563-359-7863 and sells for around $140.00.  This valve is also available from other fuel injection parts suppliers.  The purpose of this valve was to supply cranking engine manifold vacuum to the main control diaphragm for starting only.  As soon as the engine started and manifold vacuum to the valve was 3 inches or more it was to have closed off.  Failure to close itself off would cause over rich conditions and no idle quality.  If your engine will cold start without the need for the valve then don’t replace it but if cold starts are difficult then you should replace the valve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a completely rebuilt starter installed on my 1961 Corvette.  When I turn the ignition from the “start” position back to the “on” position the starter continues running.  What ideas do you have?
-David

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  I had a similar problem on a 62 Corvette that I was restoring.  The starter that I took out worked just fine but “how many of us have said no let’s get it rebuilt”!  Well “Murphy’s Law struck and the starter did the same thing as yours….it would not disengage and just kept cranking even with the key turned off.  I took it back to the rebuilder and they “forgot” to replace the some inexpensive parts in the bendix drive system of the starter housing end case.  The end of the bendix drive has a retainer, snap ring and thrust collar.  The thrust collar and snap ring were worn out and once they were replaced everything worked just fine again.  Reference a 1968 Motors Auto Repair Manual, page 167 for more more information and have your bendix drive replaced or serviced and this will solve your problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How do I remove and replace side cove trim on my 1956 corvette please? Thanks!

Jim

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

The procedure for cove trim removal & replacement is the same for 1956-1961.

Roll the windows all the way up,  Remove the door release knob, window regulator handle and

door lock lever,

Remove the door pull on '58-61,

Remove the door panel,

Remove the two inner door access covers,

Loosen the nut, star washer & flat washer from all the trim attachment studs inside the door,

Loosen the 2 nuts, star washers & flat washers at he front edge of each door. 

If the trim hasn't already separated from the door, rotate the stud CCW to release the head of the stud from the trim.  New door trim is available or you can have the old refurbished.

 To re-install, reverse the process.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

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I have a 1962 340hp. I know it is supposed to be timed at 10 degrees btdc. The tab looks like the attachment below. Could you explain to my how to read this and what notch on the tab I would use as a point of reference for 10btdc.
Thank you for you time and consideration.


Bart
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Each line on the tab represents 2 degrees of timing so that five lines from the 0 line to the A line would be 10 degrees BTDC.  Obviously this is a reproduction timing cover tab so be sure to line up the 0 mark with the groove in the harmonic balancer when you attach it to the timing cover….JB weld works great for this application and use the five minute brand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I was going to take my original 62 out of winter moth balls this week.  Started it up and the car lurched forword even though I had the clutch in.  I put the car in neutral and she cranked up just fine.  However I could not put it in any gear with the engine running.  With the engine off I could move thru the gears except reverse.  I have had this car for over twenty years and have not had one problem with it up until now.  Any thoughts on what the problem maybe or/how I could possibly fix it ?

Any help is appreciated,
George

From: Larry Pearson: SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I have this same problem with my 1960 Corvette and 1949 Plymouth from time to time. especially after not driving the cars for several months, or years.  Your clutch disc has bonded itself to the flywheel.  The solution is to break it loose.  With the clutch pedal depressed to the floor and the parking brake hard on and your right foot hard on the brake pedel, put the transmission in high gear and see if applying the starter can break it loose.  This always works for me.  The problem should not reocurr once you break the clutch loose from the flywheel and start using the car.  During the winter storage, rust probably formed on the flywheel and caused the clutch disc to stick to it. Clutch discs are made or a porous material that can absorb moisture from the air and cause the rusting.  If the problem continues to reocurr, or the above procedure doesn't free it, you will have to remove the clutch and clean everything.  Maybe you need a new clutch disc.
 
Larry Pearson

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I am not a member of the Solid Axle Organization but hoping you can give me some guidance.  I currently own a C-3 Corvette which I've had since 1992 but my favorites have always been the C-1's.  I'm at the point in my life where I can afford a C-1 and have narrowed my search down to the 1960 with the 283/245 horsepower or the 283/270 horsepower.  Can you please advise of the pros and cons of these power plants and reliability?  
 
 
                                          Thanks
 
                                          Sparky
                                          Pa.   

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Sparky,
 
The only major difference between these 2 motors is the camshaft........the 270hp is a solid lifter cam with a lumpy idle and may require occasional lifter adjustment. The 245hp is nothing more than a base 230 hp motor with dual quads and has a smooth idle. Both engines are very streetable, reliable and easy to drive. I prefer the 270 because I like the lumpy idle and solid lifter sound.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

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I cannot fill my tires because the stems are not quite long enough.  Do any of the companies like Ecklers or Corvette Central sell extenders?  I have seen generic versions but they appear to be for big SUVs and are too large.  Robert

From: Bill Hufman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Most tire stores (Discount Tire, Belle Tire, Sears, etc.) and auto parts outlets (Auto Zone, Advance Parts, NAPA Stores, etc.) will sell you valve stem extenders.
 
Probably more appropriately, there are usually three different stem lengths in two different seal diameters and the tire stores could install the proper length & balance your tires for you.
 
Corvette Central sells the correct valve stem for your C-1 with the smaller diameter seal & will sell you the correct "Dill" caps as well.
 
However, I found that the stem holes in most of my rims were oversize.
I used the correct length, larger diameter seal stems from Auto Zone with the "Dill" caps from Corvette Central and had Sears mount & balance the tires on a newer machine that didn't scratch the painted rims. 
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

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I have just purchased a 58 Corvette, It has a beautiful paint job of silver metallic blue, but there is some difference in the application of  the paint. The cove is white but the cove panel behind the front wheel has the body color of blue. also the panels underneath of the front and rear bumpers there is no clear coat and it is just the blue paint. I have seen some factory photos of the cove painted like this and photos of the area under the bumpers looking like it was not clear coated . My question did the painter take some discretionary differences or did some of the factory Corvettes come this way.? Soon too be a new member, thank you.   Bill.

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi  Regarding the Paint type.  All Corvette's were painted with lacquer through the 1981 model year, if built in St. Louis.  The ones built in Bowling Green did use a base-clear coat paint for the 1981 Cars.  To be factory correct no clear coat should be applied to the car.  Enjoy your 58.  Thanks Larry Richter

 

 

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Hi, I'm working on a 1960 corvette for a customer. Im woundering where the data plate location is at. Im looking for paint code number and any other information it might have. Was told might be under dash pass side by heater valve. Thanks for any information. Lanr

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Lane,
 
The short answer to your question is that there is no paint data plate on any 1953-1962 Corvette.
Depending on the build date, the VIN plate will either be just below the driver side upper door hinge attached with Phillips head screws up thru approx mid Nov 1959 or resistance welded to the top surface of the steering column just forward of the firewall.
You may find crayon markings that give an indication of paint color on the panel behind the passenger seat or in the trunk front panel behind the trunk liner cardboard.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Lanr,
 
There are no data plates on Corvettes prior to 1963. The original color may be found written in green crayon behind the cardboard trunk divider once the paint is scrapped away. It is usually on the right side. It will only tell you the primary color, not the cove or interior color. The interior color can usually be determined by examining the interior of the car for signs of original interior paint. Under the speedometer housing is usually a good spot to look for original interior color.

 

 

 

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President: 


 

The only paint indication on a 1960 Corvette will be in green crayon.  This will be located in the trunk.  Remove the cardboard  on the bulk head.  Look between the center support and the right hand spring tower.  If there is still paint , take a coin and press firm until paint chips or flakes off.  Once you find a green spot, go slightly right, left, down and up until letters begin to form. The green crayon is wax and paint will not stick, allowing the paint to flake off. That is why you do not want to grind or scratch vigorously.  This will only destroy it for ever.  I would suggest you apply clear on top of the color area once you find it to save it for another 50 years.  It will be written in a slight upward angle.  Long paint names will be shorten.  For example, BLk for black and BLUE for silverblue.  Good luck and let us know what you find.  The 1960 may not have left St. Louis painted silverblue.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

**********

Hello

Thank you for taking time to help.  I have recently started restoring my 54 corvette and when I went to remove the gas tank, I noticed that it had been leaking and when I got the tank out, I can see that it had been externally patched in three places and coated internally with sealer.  I think that it is time to replace the tank.  In searching the catalog parts companies, I could not locate anyone who actually sold a reproduction 54 gas tank.  Is there anyone that you could recommend that sells reproduction tanks or should I go to a local company in the area that claims to repairs gas tanks?  Although 98% of the car is and will be original, I am not concerned with regards to the authenticity of the gas tank so a reproduction tank is not an issue for me. 

Any guidance you can give would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for your time!! 

Daren 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Daren,

I have had too much trouble with rotted out gas tanks in the past. First, I tried an external patch, which worked a few days. Next, I removed the tank, rinsed it out, and poured in a yellow goop that was supposed to be an internal sealer. After sloshing it around to cover the interior, you drain out the excess and let it dry for a day or two. That was a BIG hassle, and it only worked a few days before it failed too. Finally I found a brand new gas tank (expensive) and the problem went away.

 In my opinion, the old tank is nothing but scrap metal. I found a company that can get you a stainless steel replacement gas tank for your 1954 Corvette. It is a little bit different in shape, but it is supposed to fit and function properly. You can call them at 530) 677-4270 Pacific time. I hope this works okay for you.

Good Luck. Noland Adams


 

**********

Hi!
Can anyone tell me how the 4.56 rear end gears performed on the 62 Corvette.
Off the line performance and highway driving??
Thanks!
 
Rich

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Rich,
 
Are you building a dragster or a driver ? Stock engine or GM Performance engine ?
A 4.56 will give you fast starts & acceleration but also high RPM and high ambient noise level  at driving speeds.  So, if you will be trying to drive this car, it is not advisable.
 
I had a '62 with a 3.08 with a worn engine and had to slip the clutch to get it rolling.
After rebuilding the 327-250 HP and adding a 327-350 HP cam, it ran well from a standing start
& at highway speeds but it never was mistaken as a dragster.
 
There is a reason GM had 3.70 as the standard Corvette axle ratio until the higher horsepower
327 came out in 1962.
 
Good luck with your project,
 
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  4:56 gears are strictly for drag racing and are/would be border line ridiculous for driving on the street.  The 327 engine produced more rear wheel torque than the 283 generation did and would be just fine with either 3:55 of 3:70 gears.  You will never pass a gas station with the 4:56s!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,

 I have 54 the post for the windows do not go all way down so I can not lock them in, one of the knobs is bent where would I get the parts to repair it and how hard is it to remove the door panel to replace it?

 Thanks,

Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Bob,
     The good news is the door panels and white metal bar are very easy to remove, simply bring a Phillips screwdriver. The other good news is there are no window wind mechanisms to deal with. The white plastic nobs and the chrome bezel are readily available (see below). The locking mechanism may be a challenge to find if broken. I am not sure why it will not engage. Do the front first then the rear should drop in the hole in the chrome. Is the chrome aligned properly? Did you replace / rebuild the side curtains and misalign the square pins? Also, try sliding the white ball as you try to engage the pin.
Hope this works.
Bruce Fuhrman
 
Options for '53-'55 parts;
 
E-BAY- vettegal.com (Mary Jo in Poway, CA)
Grossmueller's  908-213-8832  (In Phillipsburg, NJ)

 

 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Bob,

 1953 to 1955 Corvette side curtains (windows) is a complex combination of plastic, rubber, and different metal alloys with many specialized fasteners (rivets, screws, Etc.). Look in the member ads in our club magazine ON SOLID GROUND for Steve Newsom. He rebuilds and restores side curtains to a like-new condition. He’s in Texas at 281) 413-0028.

 Regards,  Noland Adams

**********

hi   
 
I have 62 corvette , has 180 thermostat  gauge showing 200 plus
 
thank you

Ray

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ray,
 
In no particular order, possible root causes are:
   Radiator/engine block needs flushing,
   Inadequate cooling level,
   Improper anti-freeze vs water coolant mix,
   Oil level low,
   Defective or too hot thermostat, 
   Defective temp sending unit,
   Defective temp gauge,
   Defective fan clutch,
   Defective water pump / blocked hoses,
   Fan belt too loose.
 
First thing I would do is check fluid levels. other items
Then, have the actual temperature checked against the gauge reading.
If the gauge is  right, check off the other items one by one, easiest to hardest, till you find the problem.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  If you have recently had the sending unit in the intake manifold replaced the current ones sold at most auto parts stores are not calibrated to our C1 temperature gauges.  I very reliable investment is to purchase a digital infrared heat gun.  This instrument will give you a very reliable temperature reading to know if you really have a problem.  If you find out that the car does not overheat but has an incorrect sender then you can go to any Radio Shack outlet and purchase a very inexpensive diode to be placed in line with your blue temperature gauge wire line and the sender.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Pearson, SACC Advisor: 

I have two 62's. One is 360hp and is all original including the sender, fan clutch, 170 thermostat (replaced with new Delco), water pump (rebuilt), and original 62B dated aluminum radiator (never has leaked yet).  I bought this car in 1972 and it never overheats. 
I bought a second '62 360hp in 1974 and it came with the original sender, a GM service replacement water pump, a 5-blade flex fan, 170 thermostat, and a replacement hand-crafted cross-flow copper radiator.  The FI has been replaced with an AFB 340hp setup.  The engine short block has been replaced with a GM service replacement unit for this application (bought in 1974) and uses the 30-30 camshaft.  It always ran over 180 degrees.  No matter what I did, it always ran hot.  Then I read some articles by the De Witt Corvette Radiators people explaining that the way the original aluminum radiators were constructed, they cool much better (30%) than any copper service replacement radiator can be made to cool.  Even though copper conducts heat (and electricity) much better than aluminum does.  In the 70's I bought a GM service replacement aluminum radiator to use in the FI car when the original aluminum radiator finally failed, and I still had it in storage in the garage.  So I decided to put it in this car to verify that De Witt's claims were true.  They are!  End of the overheating problem.
 
Some additional things to consider.  Today's service replacement fan clutches are calibrated to engage at 195 degrees, not 170 degrees.  They can be modified to engage at a lower temperature.  Years ago an article was written in the NCRS Restorer magazine on how to do this.  These cars all came with a 170 degree thermostat, not 180.  The 170 thermostats may still be available.  I have no ideas on getting a properly calibrated service replacement sender unit.  It is important that the fan shroud be completely in place.  Make certain that the fan blade tips are spaced out from the engine so they are just inside the fan shroud.  If you are using a fixed fan in place of the clutch fan it has to be properly spaced out from the water pump to achieve this.  On the 340 and 360hp cars there are flat rubber seals on each side of the radiator to prevent cooling air from bypassing the radiator on the sides.  There are also three flat rubber seals below the radiator glued to the fiberglass to seal the bottom of the radiator.  Consult the AIM to see how this is done.  Corvette Central should be able to supply the seals and special retainers for the side seals.  The engine timing must be set correctly (8 degrees, as I recall).  I use Podell's lead addative to prevent detonation in this engine (11.25:1 compression).
 
If you fix all of these things, you should have no more cooling problems. 
 
Larry Pearson

**********

Do you have any info about how many 1960 corvettes Tasco Turquoise had silver coves?  I have #100.
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

According to all the information I have from original Chevrolet documents to current NCRS judging guides, the only cove color available from the factory on a turquoise 1960 was white. 383 were painted turquoise with white coves.  However, note that 15 cars were painted "unknown special colors or primer".
 
We can assume that a dealer could and would paint the cove any color the costumer requested. In my opinion, it is unlikely your car came from the factory with a silver cove.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

Dear SACC,

I think I got a good one that may not have been seen before!

 I have my 58 trunk lid shimmed so the back and front of trunk lid is even with body line.  But both sides is 1/4 to 1/3 inch above the body line.  I believe the correct way to fix is to break loose the body rear upper surround and shim up and fit to the trunk lid or maybe install new upper rear surround.

 Question:  Can I do the opposite:  alter the shape of the trunk lid with to match the body line?  Can I add new fiberglass material to the trunk lid and then grind or cut off the old material on the sides of the trunk lid?

 Is this possible?

 Aloha,

Eric
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Eric,
None of these cars was perfect coming off the production line.
Over-restoring an old Corvette is like scrubbing a rare coin to "brighten" it up. 
Before you do anything, study as many other '58 cars as you can so that you know what "normal" looks like.
The reason for shimming is to allow the weather-seal to keep water out of the trunk area.
My advise............
If your trunk is wet, re-shim it.
If your trunk is dry, leave it be.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

**********

I’m thinking of using Shell diesel oil 10-40 w in my 1962 corvette with a 327 engine.  (?)  Dennis

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Many controversies about today’s oils and older cars with flat tappet camshafts.  Starting about six years ago many engine builders were confronted with rebuilt flat tappet engines with the camshaft going flat at or near break in.  The one thing we now know is that current engine oils do not have very much if any zinc dithiophosfate or phosphorus.  These compounds were very prevalent in the “old Days” but the oil companies began to remove them from their oils because they were not compatible with catalytic convertors in newer car exhaust systems.  The EPA has required auto manufacturers to warrant the catalytic convertors for 150,000 miles and the manufacturers went to the oil companies and made them produce engine oils that would not devoid the warranty.  Many specialty oil companies have moved into the void and sell and produce oils with high zinc and phosphorus compounds in them specifically marketed to our older cars with flat tappet camshafts.  Amsoil is just one of many oil companies that produce this type of oil today.  It is called Z-ROD and is a fully synthetic oil with high concentrations of zinc and phosphorus.  The downside of these specialty compounded oils is they are not cheap but neither is your older Corvette.  These specialty oils are an insurance policy for your older Corvette engines. 

 

 

 

**********

Do they make an insert to place in the convertible top bin on my 1957 Corvette.  All I have is the hard top and I want to clean up the soft top storage area.
Also does anyone produce the plug covers for the (2) holes in the bottom of the above top storage bin?
 
Thanks
 
Bob

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bob,
 
The two holes in the bottom of the folding top storage area are drain holes for water leakage,
so mine are left open.
In folding top equipped cars, there is a black felt pad glued to the tank cover. 
 
You could add a "big tank" cover to fill up the space or just use it as extra trunk space.
This area is not readily visible if you have a hardtop only car.

 
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Bob,
 
I have 2 57's in my garage. One is an early car, the other is late. Each has 3 holes in the bottom of the convertible top storage area. I believe the center hole, about 3/8" is a drain hole just in case water should get in the storage area. The other 2 holes which  are 2" in diameter and located just under the hinges, are access holes for installing the nuts on the top of the shock absorbers. Although I have never seen covers over those 2" holes, I believe originally they would have been covered. I cut out 2 square pieces of tar paper and glue them over the holes. 
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

Helping a friend restore a '59 Corvette. It is in pretty bad shape with a lot of monkeys playing around the car for years. The front emblem is on and cut through the Fiberglas. The rear emblem is missing and it looks and feels like someone did a lot of body work. Did the rear trunk emblem fit through a hole like the front emblem? Was it just put on with bolts through the Fiberglas? How can we find the correct position of the emblem on the trunk? I would appreciate any help you can give us.
Best regards,\Bryce

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Emblems in the front and back were the same and fit the same on 58 - 60.

 

Yes, the front and back emblems were mounted in the same fashion.  The convex "bowl" of the emblem fit in to the larger hole with the three studs fitting into the three smaller holes on the body/trunk lid.  The three studs are fastened with speed nuts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bryce,
 
58-60 have  hole in the front panel for the front emblem. They would have the same size hole in the trunk lid for the rear emblem. They use the same emblem front & rear and they attach with 3 speed nuts onto the 3 bezel studs.
 
If the trunk lid on your friend's 59 has no emblem hole, it may be a 56-57 trunk lid or one of the previous owners glassed or used body filler to close it.
 
Either way, there are two choices.
Buy a correct trunk lid w/ emblem hole or find a correct 59-60 to use to make a locator template.
A 58 car would work but the trunk spears would make the template more difficult to accurately locate for a 59. 
 
 Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

**********

I have a 1961 245HP duel wcfb carbs. It stalls on left hand turns only. I first thought it was vapor locking but temp from carb bowls to fuel pump is good. I tried using racing insulation on fuel line from fuel pump to fuel bowl/filter to be sure. I checked the  rubber fuel line from steel line to fuel pump, no problem with clearance or twisting or binding due to torque. Replaced fuel pump which seemed to have helped, but still have the stumble.

Do you think it is the Carter part number 145-142 brass bushing between the fuel bowl and the vacuum passage.

Out of ideas in N.C.

Chuck

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Adviser:  Stalling while only turning in one direction usually indicates that some of the floats are not set properly allowing fuel to slosh from one or more vent tubes.  The beauty of Rochester fuel injection is that it eliminated this problem!  Check and reset your float heights to factory specifications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,

I'm not a member but I came across your website and I have a question I'm hoping you can answer. I have owned two Corvettes many years ago. My first was a 1959 that I bought in 1964 and the second was a 66 I bought in 1985. Hands down my 59 was the car that gave me Corvette Fever.

I'm a little older now and have started a build on a new Morrison 62 solid axle chassis and not being able to find a 62 body that I could afford I opted for a Downs Industries replica 62. Unfortunately it is as hard a build as if I had bought a 62 wreck. Nothing fits, everything has to be customized to accept NOS or original parts. (I'm referring to the body, the chassis is perfect.). Now my question; Do the cut outs in the floor pan beneath the fuel tank have a purpose? The floor in my replica is solid. No holes. Someone on another forum suggested that the original cutouts were a safety feature and that has caused me some concern. Can you clarify this issue for me?

Thank you

Bob

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  You should probably contact Morrison first since they got you into this “mess” in the first place.  We are predominately a factory original organization with little or nothing to do with “kit cars.”  Good luck with your project…….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bob,

Although I don't disagree with Doug regarding kit cars, as a retired automotive engineer, I believe you have asked a safety related question that might be of interest to C-1 owners.

 

The holes below the fuel tank have three purposes;

1) Drain plug clearance hole on the far right (pass) side to allow the tank to be drained while

    still installed in the car.

2) Holes for front attachment of tank hold-down straps& attachment brackets to secure the

    tank in place. It is extremely important to use both the straps and the insulator

    between tank & straps to eliminate metal to metal contact.

    Loose tanks, wear / abrasion & possible sparking are not good.
3) Other holes are to allow circulation of air up & around the tank.

    Without these holes, gasoline vapors could leak into the passenger compartment.

 Other holes that may be missing are the tank vent hose holes that should be located in the gas filler area. The gas tank must be vented.

 In the long run, my bet is that it may be less expensive to buy a new body from these folks,
Back to the Future Products, LLC.

In any case,
Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

My 59 is an early car. Our research after buying a judging guide says the inside of the trunk should be interior color. My car will be black with red interior. So is the underside of the trunk lid red? Thanks for your help.

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Trunk compartment color has frequently been a point of discussion, as different examples exist.

 

Noland Adams' Corvette Restoration & Technical Guide, Volume 1 (pages 254 & 255) indicates that for 1958 throught 60 the trunk compartment color matches the car's interior.  He goes on to say the 1958 Corvette paint instructions indicate the hardtop, trunk compartment, deck lid panel (inside), and folding top lid panel (inside) were all painted the same; to match the car's interior.  He states the factory continued to use these same painting instructions for1959 and 1960.

 

He also cites an example of a 1960 Corvette where a trunk compartment was painted the same as the car's exterior.  He only indicates this for 1960 and states there is no rhyme nor reason as to the timing or why it occurred.

 

However, the NCRS judging manual ( page 12) states: "1958 and early 1959 trunks were painted interior color.  Remainder of 1959 to 1960 painted exterior body color."

 

You mention your Corvette is an early 59. If so, both opinions support painting the trunk interior the same as the car's interior color.  Nolans research supports the inside of the deck lid being the same as the trunk color.  There is a GM file photograph of this on an early 1958 prototype, on page 242 of his book.

 

**********

Hi,
I have a 1954 corvette will a 1953 fuel pump work in my car? Also you help me last week on the carb’s flooding all three were flooding, what should the pressure be from the pump?

 Thanks,
 Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

H Bob,
    The '53 fuel pump (AC 9797) is the same as the passenger car pump and easier to find. It will work on the '54 except you will not be able to locate the fuel filter by the pump where it was placed on the '54's. The '53 filter was mounted in front of the #1 carb. The '54 pump (AC 4132) has the fuel attachment lines angled to permit the filter to be added next to the pump.
   The fuel pumps produce about 10 psi. I put a pressure regulator in mine and set at 1.5 psi and I works fine, no flooding. You may have needle valve seats that are worn or accelerator pump diaphragms that are porous causing the flooding?
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Everyone.
    I have been trying to find out the correct ppg code in lacquer paint for for my 1954.The new tech manual and judging guide only says Metallic Beige for the interior pieces the car is Pennant blue. Does any one know the exact code  in lacquer they used.for the Metallic Beige.Thank you Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Bob,
    If there were codes in 1954, I do not know where they recorded them! Maybe Noland knows. When I restored my '54  we were able to find some protected original paint under the weather striping and some metal plates. We polished and clear coated the best spot and the painter computer color matched to the original color perfectly. There were only 300 painted Pennant Blue.
Good luck.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have another question, where on the frame are the vin numbers on the frame.  Rick

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  The stamped VIN # is stamped on the top of the frame rail on the left side about under the drivers thigh. It cannot be seen since there is only about a one inch gap between the Fiberglas floor and the frame. To check it, I had to make a thin wood stick,wrap it with sandpaper, then clean off many years of dirt and rust. Then clean off, pack in some white chalk or powder, then blow off. Then use a small dental mirror and flashlight to read the # and compare with the door post. They should match.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi

I have a 57 Vette. The door was not closing properly. I tried to adjust the door striker. Two of the 3 screws were stuck solid and impossible to loosen. I tried PB blaster, using an impact screwdriver, and finally I've drilled out the heads figuring I could get it with a stub remover. Still not working. I think a prior owner has glued the sticker bolts. Is there a way to access the bolts from the back side? What do you suggest.

Thanks,  Bob
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The door striker bolts screw into a nut plate that is behind the door jam and is basically not accessible unless you want to remove the wheels and cut through the body.  The screws have become completely rusted over time and this is not an uncommon problem with C1s.  I suggest that you grind off the remaining heads and drill out the screws and install helicoils to repair the holes in the nut plate itself.  Be patient and good luck with this project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
I just pick up a 1954 corvette a few issues: the first is when I start the car gas pours out of the carb’s and the engine starts shaking, and the top it came shipped  down how do I put it up what is the process?
Thank You,

Bob

From: Bruce Furhman, SACC Secretary: 

HI Bob,
 
    The gas coming out of the 3 carbs is either bad accelerator diaphragms (rubber which gets attacked by our new gas) and / or stuck needle valves in the float chambers. You need to rebuild the carbs and put a pressure regulator in line and set for about 2 psi.
  I am not sure what top you are referring to? The convertible top, hood or the top of the carbs?
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

Follow up: Thanks for the tip on the carb’s . The convertible top, having a hard time latching the rear to the deck is there a procedure do I start latching front middle bows or rear first? Thanks,Bob

From: Bruce Furhman, SACC Secretary:  Hi Bob,
OK, this is a common problem with '53 - '55 tops. Here is what I did to keep them latched assuming you want to keep all stock.
The back plates in the deck cover are probably worn and are made of soft metal. Any vibration and they pop loose. So, latch them first, then the front. I replaced the 2 plates which helped but did not keep them from coming loose on long trips. I then wedged a small piece of rubber between the chrome release lever and the base clip which keeps the teeth engaged in the base plate. You may want to place a rubber band or duct tape around the rubber and lever to assure it does not come out. This has worked for me on long trips.
Good luck.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

**********

I was driving my 62 original 327/300 hp about 60 mph, in the cool evening, when the engine just shuts down as if you would turn the ignition switch off. It was off for about 10 seconds then the engine restarts and continuous to run. Ok, odd...drove for another 2 or 3 minutes then off again. This time after I came to a stop on the side of the road.... She would not start.  Towed her home and look for electrical problem because it had gas going in the carb when I would pull back the throttle lever. Changed out the coil and she started right up. Great!!! When sitting behind the wheel it is automatic to look at each gauge for those whom have had one for decades.  Well, the battery was on constant discharge...not much...but it wasn't where it should have been. More especially when I would reive the engine it may move a fraction but would remain in the negative side. Turned on the lights still no movement. Thus, I changed out the volt regular, coil resistor still the same.  Your suggestion and/or experience on what I may do next would be much appreciated.

Thanks
3208

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Generator or regulator and most likely the coil voltage resistor problem, but I am not sure which.  At a recent antique tractor meeting (club that I am involved with) a battery shop spoke and he says always check the battery first.  If a battery is 3 years old it most likely has failed and sometimes it will not hold enough for a generator to keep up allowing for no spark to the engine.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Darrell,

Sounds like you had a defective ignition coil.

The voltage regulator that you replaced may not have been defective.

 I would advise you to polarize the electrical system.

Form a  4-5 inch insulated copper wire into a C-shape and arc across the Battery & Generator (top & bottom) terminals on the voltage regulator.

There is no way to know how long this condition has existed so be sure to have the battery & generator output checked after you get it running.  
Good luck,

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Simple question: how to install gasline/brake frameclips on 57. I push them in the holes and they are still loose. The ends going through the frame rails are crescent shaped and do not spring back. Whats the secret?
Thanks,
Bob

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Bob,
 
The reproduction brake/fuel line clips sold by the various Corvette suppliers simply do not function as they should. I always buy extras because I know some will break and others will fail. Any tension on the fuel and brake lines will pull the clips out of the frame. Make sure your lines are straight and true.............not always an easy thing to do.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I am restoring a 1959 corvette Black, silver coves and red interior. I have done research on the paint code for the red dash color and have found several different answers. I was hoping you could answer this question for me as we are at the point of needing to buy the red paint. We meet your club in Kissimmee Fl, Very nice group hope to meet again as we have two C1 corvettes and LOVE them. Thanks hope you can help me out with this question.  Debbie

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The red interior color of your 1959 Corvette was called Roman Red.  There were three different manufacturers of this lacquer color from St. Louis.  DuPont 2931LH, R&M A1138R and Ditzler DDL70961.  Lacquer paint is generally not available today but a high quality body and paint shop should be able mix up this color for you using modern paints and materials.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

good afternoon. My name is Don and I live in Ohio. Is there a local chapter or can I register otherwise? I do have a question about 57-62 positraction carriers. I am currently restoring my 62 that I have had since 1966. I have heard that there are two or three generations of carriers and I would like to know how to identify them so I can get the correct parts and also clutch packs. If there are sources for parts that you know about, that would be helpful also. Thanks, Don

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Don,

Unfortunately, there is not currently a local SACC chapter in the Ohio area but all it takes is a few interested C-1 owners to start one. You didn't say where you live in Ohio but after you join the National SACC, Michigan Chapter is authorized to admit members from NW Ohio & NE Indiana.

Contact me at MI_SACC@yahoo.com if you are interested.

 Regarding rebuilding a posi unit, I assume from your question that your car does not currently have a posi-traction differential. But whether that's true or not, contact Darrell Shepherd at 4 speeds by Darrell in Vermilion, IL.

He can rebuild your differential or sell you a correctly dated posi-traction unit.  Darrell has rebuilt two 3.70 posi units for me. I supplied the correct castings & flanges. 
He supplied the GM series 3 carriers and other internal components.

 Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

My 59 vette ,283 with carter wcfb 4bb starts good when cold. After driven half hour or more, fully warmed up, and shut off and restarted within 1 to about 2 minutes will starts good but if not started for 10 to 20 minutes it won't start unless I press the gas peddle to the floor. It acts like its flooded. I removed the air cleaner and can see an occasional dripping of gas in the manifold. Carburator has been rebuilt. Timing, point gap all good. Been told it's todays lousy gas. A friends 57 chevy 283 does the same thing. Hope someone has a solution as this is hard on starters. How do I join your organization? You help a lot of people. Thank you very much.

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Joining is easy.

Look for the membership application tab just above the technical help tab. 

Print it, fill it out & send it in.

If you live within the borders of an SACC Chapter,  you should give then a try also.

 Your car has a common issue that has been discussed previously

Basically, your '59 and your friend's '57 have the same cast iron intake manifold (3746829) with built in carburetor heating ports. The hot start problem is from the fuel boiling over into the carburetor throat and into the engine.
In order of difficulty:

 1) Switch to premium gas which has a higher boiling temp.
 2) Set the float level lower but not so low that it cavitates on hard turns.
 3) Put extra gaskets or a fiber spacer between the manifold & carburetor as a heat insulator.
 4)  Switch to the fuel injection intake manifold gasket set that closes off the carburetor heating ports
.
Good luck solving your flooding,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Hello, My name is Mike and l own a 1960 Corvette. I would like to go to a larger wheel and tire combo in the rear. I currently have a 6.70/15 stock tire on stock wheels. I would like to upgrade to a 7 inch tread width tire. What backspacing is needed on the wheel to fit this size tire without modifications to the body or suspension?

 
Thank you,

 
Mike

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,

You can put Coker American Classic 205-75R15 tires on your stock rims all the way around to get wider tires, radial performance and a stock appearance all in the same package w/o affecting your speedometer. That's what I would recommend. 

 

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Hi,  My name is Bob . I have a 1960 Honduras maroon corvette that I've owned since 1975.  It's mostly stock original except for some updates, tires carb, intake, electronic distrubuter,etc.  If you attended Memphis it was there!  My question and problem is, I have stock wheels and original hubcaps not after markets.  The hubcaps are a real bear to mount on the wheels Is there any trick or method to making this job any less of a strain .  I've spent hours taking the dents out and then only putting them back in when I install them.         IF this e-mail thing works out I have many questions about my car.   serial #9953  out of 10261   found a lot of 61 parts on the car that look like they were there from day one!       THANKS  BOB

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bob,

I saw you and your car in Memphis. I remembered it because I have one just like it.

 Regarding the wheel covers, I have a 2 1/2 inch diameter rubber hammer and a 1 1/2 inch vinyl lead shot filled hammer that I use depending on how tight the rim to wheel cover fit is.

-I have never dented mine but I sometime have to tap around the outside edge 2 or 3 times to
 make sure the cover is completely seated.

Always strike the cover squarely with the face of the hammer, never with the edge.

A piece of 2x4 to use as a tapping block might help in keeping the  hammer away from the cover.

Bill Huffman, Pres.  Michigan Chapter SACC  
 

**********

I am a new member and have a 1962 corvette 4 spd. I do not know if it was the original transmission. I took it to the shop that has been working on the car because I lost  a screw in the shifter and could not get the car out of reverse. The screw was installed, but the car now runs much less smooth, and vibrates more  than it did previously. I thought that the shifter made need adjustment and took it back to the shop. They said that  the adjustment was fine( the car shifts from one gear to another easily) but they noticed a jury rigged transmission mount that may be creating the problem. I order the correct transmission mount. They also noticed that the shaft on the drive shaft yoke was exposed to a greater length than it should be. They thought the trans may have been converted from a 3 speed and said that I need a new drive shaft, which I presume is longer than the one on the car

 My questions are( 1)  how much of the yoke shaft should be visible and (2) Are there different drive shaft lengths for a 4speed, a 3 speed and automatic trans( in case the car was initially an automatic trans).

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

New member,

Sounds like you may have a number of underlying issues that may need to be addressed.

Questions:

Stock shifter with reverse lock-out? Does it have the anti-rattle spring & bracket ?

Is the car really vibrating or is it the shifter? Or the drive shaft/ yoke ?

The 4 -speed transmission mount is different than a 3-speed mount although the transmission cross-member/support is the same.

If the transmission was misaligned, the spline on the output shaft or the drive shaft yoke spline could be loose/worn. On a '62, you should have the 26 tooth spline on shaft & yoke.

 Regarding yoke exposure, you most likely saw 1 to 1 1/2 inch of  exposed outside diameter due to rear suspension drop from being up on a hoist.

 Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Thank you for the earlier prompt reply's to several question I have sent to your relating to my 1960 C-1.

My primary issue with this car is that at 65 or 70 mph, my engine, with the 3.7 rear end is turning over 3,000 rpms.  If I go to a 3.08 posi this should drop my rpms down to around 2,600 or so.

I have owned this 1960, two 1969's, a 1999 and a 2007.  Both the 1999 and 2007 were 6 speed manual transmissions and at 70 mph the engine rpms were barely over 1,600.  What do you have to do to this car to get the rpms down to around 2,000 at 70 mph?

Season Greeting to You and Yours,

Don

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  It may be a case of wanting your cake and eating it too!  Remember you are driving a C1 Corvette and not a C5 or C6.  Six speed manuals are great today but your C1 is 54 years old.  Depending on what engine is currently in your C1 going to 3:08s will make it a real dog around town.  Based on my experience, I suggest that you may have to get used to the RPMs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*********

I have a Roman Red 1959 with white coves, white soft-top, and black interior.  I would like to add a hardtop which was originally part of the build, but no longer in my possession.  What is most proper, a white hard-top or red?  I prefer the red, but can live with white if that is more correct.  Thanks!  

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Most hardtops that I have seen are body color although there have been a few painted the cove color.


What is proper? Or were they even available in cove color from St. Louis?
I didn't work there, but I know a couple of guys who did.

They are blind copied on this memo so perhaps they can tell us .

 

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

From: John Hinckley, Michigan Chapter Advisor: 

Factory-installed hardtops left St. Louis in body color; there was no mechanism to order them any other way.
 
Regards,
 
John Hinckley

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC VP: 

Never say never, but hard tops were only offered, from the factory, painted the primary body color.

 

I am aware of one case where it was painted to match the cove, at the dealer prior to delivery, which I guess would have made it "original". 

 

Also, the headliner color and style should match the car's interior color and year.

 

Personal note... for investment purposes, it's nice to have a correct hard top, for a car which came with one.  I too purchased and restored one for my '60.  However, I enjoy driving the car with the top down and it was a pain taking a hard top of it on. Plus, if I left home with the hard top on, no matter how nice the day was, the hard top had to remain on until I returned home.  After one summer of using the hardtop, I stored it in the garage where it remained for 15 years; selling it rather than move it following retirement.

 

Just food for thought.

 

 

**********

I have recently purchased a 1960 Corvette that has had a frame off restoration. Since the restoration the bumper "down" nose panel has been damaged. I have located a replacement part from Zip Corvette parts.

 
My question is how much of the old nose down panel has to be removed in the area where it bonds to the nose "up" panel?
I have recently acquired several books on automotive fiberglass repairs and intend to install this part myself.
Any other guidance would be appreciated.
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ron,

The lower front panel as an OEM part extends from the center line of the headlights back to the wheel openings from one side to the other behind the bumpers and below the grill surround. You might want to consult a local Chevy dealer or body shop that does fiberglass repair to see if your lower panel can be repaired. An otherwise completely restored C-1 is a poor place to start learning fiberglass repair.

 

Remember the Hippocratic Oath, "Do your patient no harm".

Or as Dirty Harry says, "A man has to know his limitations".

 

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

Follow up question, I have owned both a  1999 and 2007 Corvette and both had the 6 speed transmission.

My goal on this car is to make it as drive able as possible yet maintaining the external appearance of being 100% original.  Do you know if it is possible to install one of these transmissions in this car?  I would like to get the motor turning around 2100 rpm at 70 if at all possible. The 1999 and 2007 were turning around 1600 with the six speed.

Thanks,

Don 

          From: Paul Lemieux, Michigan Chapter: 

My 59, 230 hp, had an original 3 speed, 3.70 geared drive line.  The trans started to leak quite a bit so a decision was made to replace it with a keisler built tremec 5 speed.  At 70, my engine is turning just 2100 rpm, this has made the car so much more fun to drive.  I also optioned to have the optional shifter which is identical to the stock 4 speed shifter.  I ordered directly from keisler and had the trans professional installed, I believe that Corvette Central also sells the keisler unit.

 
Paul

**********

Hi

I have just recently joined the club and my member number is 3701. I purchased a 1960 C1 that has had a frame off restoration in 2009.  I have been working out of country and the car was not driven until I retired in August of this year.  
There are three primary issues:

 
Issue #1:  The clutch pads are frozen and the limited slip feature of this rear 
                end is not working.  I have added one of the additives that was
                recommended, went to parking light did figure eights, and
                pads are still stuck.
                What is required to service these pads?

 
Issue #2:   The car has either a 4:11 or 4:56 rear end and at 70 MPH the 
                 tach is showing 3,000+ RPM. 
                I am getting parts estimates of between $ 1200 and $ 2400
                to install a posi 3:36. Any idea as to which estimate is reasonably
                correct?  Is a 3:08 possible?

 
Issue #3:   The car has a 383 stroker installed with an estimated HP of 450.
                 Since the car has the original tire size and I do not plan to spend
                 my weekends at the drag strip, I do not believe that the chassis
                 or rear end will  be at risk.  Do you believe otherwise?
                
Donald
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Don,

Let's address your questions one at a time.

 

1) I had a similar issue with a rebuilt 3.70 posi unit. I had it rebuilt, then went a couple years before I got around to installing it. We put in Posi-lube plus a GM additive and spent a couple hours doing figure 8s.  The clutch pads were still stuck.

 

Took the car on a 50 mile road trip, drained the axle lube completely, added another bottle of GM additive and then tried the figure 8s again. over the next week of short runs, the posi unit began working fine.

 

2) With a stock 3.70 axle in mine, it runs 3000-3500 RPM at highway speeds.

Since your car was recently redone, and if it has the original rear end, you should be able to read the axle code stamped on the passenger side front surface of the differential casting along with the differential assembly date.

Look for AN for 3.70, AP for 4.11 or AQ for 4.56.

 

Casting number on the driver side should be 3743833 along with a casting date.

Last complete rebuild cost me about $1800, summer of 2012.

Either a 3.55, 3.36 or 3.08 will require a new carrier.

It is your car, make yourself happy.

 3) The 1949 Chevrolet chassis with stock tires, brakes and steering in your 1960 Corvette was never designed to handle 450 HP in any way except CAREFULLY.

 Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres., Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
My name is Jay and I am looking for the pins and clips that hold the shifter to the trans. on a 1961 4 speed.
Thanks for your help,
Jay

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jay.
You don't say whether you have a Borg Warner T-10 or a Muncie Transmission. You also didn't say whether you have a stock shifter or a Hurst.

. An OEM original 61 Corvette w/4-speed should have a BW T-10 with T-handle reverse lock-out.  However, after 52 years any combination is possible.

 After you find out what is in your car, complete linkage kits for your combination are available from most Corvette parts vendors for less than $100. 

If you really only need the pins & clips, check Corvette Central P/Ns 531016 & 531115.

 

Bill Huffman, Pres.  Michigan Chapter SACC 
 

**********

Hi there, we have a 1958 Corvette with a 1962 283 engine with an aluminium intake manifold.   Can you tell us whether the 1962 283 corvette motor had an aluminium intake manifold from factory?

 Regards,

Dave

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  All 1962 Corvettes were assembled with the newly introduced 327 cubic inch engine with various horsepower ratings.  The 340 horsepower version had a single four barrel aluminum intake manifold.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello !
Trying to improve the turn signal cancel mechanism I got some information from Rarecorvettes that refers to some leaf springs that go under the turn signal ring.  With the mechanism laid out in front of me, I see neither the thin leaf springs, nor any place to mount them if I had 'em.  Is there a source for these internal steering column parts ?
Thanks,
Gary

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The turn signal cancelling cams very often wear out.  Paragon Reproductions sells a complete turn signal cancelling cam mechanism , part number 8960K.  Your turn signal housing has two small wheels that must be cleaned and lubricated in order for the new mechanism to work properly.  Use needle nose pliers to insure that they turn freely after cleaning and lubricating them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello. I have a question regarding starter motors for C1 Corvettes. I have a 1958 Corvette with the original 283 engine. I have tried to keep it mostly original.  I am trying to find out if anyone actually makes a high torque starter motor that will fit my engine. It does not have to be a mini starter, a full size starter will be fine. I have tired unsuccessfully twice in purchasing a high torque mini starter only to find out it does not fit my engine. The holes on the engine are 1/8" off from the holes on the starter.  The reason I am looking for a high torque versus a regular, is after I drive for about an hour and the engine is hot,, when I stop for a coffee and return to start the car, it is difficult to start. I have narrowed it down to the starter being overheated. I added a thermal wrap to the motor/ solenoid, but that did not really help. 
Or does anyone make a high quality starter that does not get overheated and will start easily in warm weather. (it gets warm in Calif.)
Any ideas or assistance is greatly appreciated.
 
Thank you,
Tim

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  This one is very easy.  Just buy a GM starter for a big block Corvette C2 as all C2s with the big engine had a high torque starter motor.  You will have to just change the end frame, the part that bolts to the starter in a C1 to the bell housing.  This is an easy fix and you will love the difference it makes.  I also suggest that you install a larger in diameter positive battery cable when you make this conversion. Go to a two gauge or larger as they flow more current with much less resistance to engine heat. Works like a charm for me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

****************************************************************************************************************


Hello there,

My dear husband who would kill me if he saw that I was typing this, misplaced the only set of keys we have to our 1961 Corvette.  I have a sneaking suspicion they are in the trunk, but he seems to think they are in the pocket to a USMC uniform that he turned back into the Corps when he retired last year.

Anyway - no locksmith wants to touch the car, so I thought I'd seek expert advice about how I go about fixing this dilemma.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Michelle

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The good news is, you can open the trunk without a locksmith.  The bad news is, you will have to damage the trunk emblem in order to do it.  Drill a series of holes in the plastic emblem to weaken it and break it out as well as the metal dish behind the emblem.  Now use this hole to reach the rod on the key tumbler inside the trunk lid. Now pull the rod until the latch releases.  Good luck and all is not lost

 

 

.

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

One way would be to remove the glove box key assembly and take to a locksmith. He can make a key which if a stock car should match the trunk lock.
Phil, an owner of a '62.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Herron, past Treasurer of SACC;  

"One key fits all" on my 57.  If your glove box is unlocked, open it and remove the lock.  The actual lock unit (inside the housing) will have a four digit number stamped on it; that's the key code for that lock.  I don't recall 61 for sure but assuming it's the same as 57 that code (and a competent locksmith) will be able to make a new key.  As an alternative, call AAA (I did once when I locked the keys in my trunk 3500 mi from home!).  I won't bother with the details but a locksmith came out and opened the trunk with no damage.
 
Bill Herron

 

**********

Im looking for a place to purchase a service manual that has the information on how to change and set up a new crown and pinion gear set.
Hope you can help.
Thanks

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Refer to Corvette Service Manual ST-12 Chapter 4.

**********
Hi,
Could you please supply me with the wheel alignment specs for my '61 Vette?
It's steering very average and I've got her booked in at the local tyre shop for adjustment but they haven't any spec's.

Thanks in advance,
Alex

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  

As per Corvette Service Manual ST-12 wheel alignment is as follows:

Caster    2 degrees  +- ½ degree

Camber   ½ degree +- ½ degree

King Pin Inclination   3 1/2 to 4 1/2 degrees

Toe-In (per wheel)    1/16th inch – 1/8thinch

Toe-Out on Turns

   Inner Wheel     20 degrees +- 2degrees

Outer Wheel 24 degrees +- 2dgrees

**********
I've got another question.

I need a service manual / rebuild manual with pictures of the original
3-Speed Saginaw transmission which is used in my 1960 Corvette.

It seems that there is no information or manual about this 3-Speed
transmission. That is very disappointing. Furthermore there are no rebuild
kits for this kind of transmission available?

Do you know where I can gather information about this transmission or even a
book? And where to buy any correct rebuild kit?

Thank you very much and have a nice day.


Yours sincerely


Ruedi Keller, Switzerland

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Information about rebuilding and repairing three speed manual transmissions can be found in a 1961 Chevrolet Passenger Car Shop Manual.  The chapter in this manual would also apply to your 1960 three speed transmission.

**********

I have a 1962 corvette and would like some help the number on the steering colm is #20867S103393 I would like to know the build date of the corvette and what would be the correct date code for the block and heads 327 340 hp with 4 speed any help would be great
Thanks Walt

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  Your '62 was built fairly early on the 15th of November1962.  Actually your '62 is fairly early production model year.  The '62 started production on September 17, 1962.

 

 

 

 

**********

What type of gas should I use in my 1959 vette it's a 283 automatic just restored,thank you Phil

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Your engine has lower compression than the high performance engines and should operate just fine on 91 Octane gasoline.  Today’s gasoline’s are 10% gasohol which is very detrimental to older cars fuel systems.  Gasohol attracts water which when combined with alcohol forms an acid compound which will start to eat away at the inside of older pot metal carburetors and metal fuel lines.  By adding one once of automatic transmission fluid to each gallon of gasoline will inhibit this process so that rust and acids can not form in your Corvette’s fuel system.

**********

Hi,
I just ran across your web site and I'm not an SACC member.  I have a 1960 Corvette and the generator has started to smoke so I'm guessing that it needs to be rebuilt. Do you have any recommendations for a shop that can either rebuild my current generator or a source where I can purchase a "new" generator?  I live in Minnesota but obviously I'd be willing to send the generator off to a shop that knows what they are doing.
Thanks.
Doug

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Doug,

When replacing parts on your 1960 Corvette, be aware that original parts are more valuable than common replacement parts. Even if your Corvette is modified, keep any original parts you have.

Normally generators are rebuildable if the case isn’t damaged. Every Corvette parts dealer will have a shop in their area that rebuilds generators, starters, distributors, master brake cylinders, Etc. If your part is original, be sure that you get your original rebuilt and returned. I don’t know where you live, but I’d contact the closest Corvette vendor first.

 If you can’t find a vendor, call Corvette Stop at 530) 677-4270. I have worked in Drew’s business for several years, and he knows about the needs of Corvette owners. Corvette Stop is in El Dorado County, California, just East of Sacramento. That’s why I suggested that you try a local source first.

 Enjoy your “60,

 Noland Adams

From Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  First off there are many qualified generator rebuilding shops scattered across the country but you must first determine that you have the correct generator that is original/correct for your Corvette to go through the motions of having it rebuilt.  If the generator in question is not original then you could obtain a generic replacement or seek out a rebuilt original that is correct for your Corvette.  If your generator still has the original Delco Remy metal tag affixed to the body it will either read 1102043 for all engines except for high performance fuel injection or 1102173 for high performance fuel injection engines.  If you have neither of these generators on your Corvette you could opt out for either a generic “over the counter” replacement or seek out a rebuilt correct generator for your Corvette.  NCRS Driveline or Ebay would be your best bet for correctness.

**********
How do I know when my car was built?? 104585           model year 1958.

From; Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Your 1958 Corvette was built early on February 25, 1958.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 I recently bought a neglected 61, and am concerned that it has the wrong driveshaft.  My question is this: what is the correct overall length of the driveshaft?   
 
I replaced two very badly arched rear springs with replacements from Paragon and now see that the yoke doesn't penetrate the transmission tailshaft up to the previously worn (bright), area?
Also, the driveshaft looks to be an aftermarket shaft.
 Thank You,
 Ger

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  Drive shaft measures 34 1/2" from center of front u joint to center of rear u joint. Yoke is 4 3/4 ".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
I've got another question about my 1960 Corvette.

I just cannot figure out how to install the door end tab which should be
bent and also holds the weatherstrip (see enclosed pictures).

Do you have a close-up picture of such a tab correctly installed? It seems
that it would otherwise make scratches at the door.

Thank you very much for an answer and have a nice day.

Yours sincerely

Ruedi

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Look in the 1960 assembly manual, section F, sheet 11. Once you install the retainer, you bend the vertical end up under the weatherstrip. And yes, sometimes it will scratch the door jam.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********
Can you tell me the proper diameter of the front coil springs for my 59 vette, what they put in the car measures 0.6685 and the suspension has absolutely no give whatsoever, any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance for your time, Pat

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  Original 53-62 standard Corvette spring coils measure .550 and the free ( unsprung) hight of the spring is 13 3/4". 57-59 heavy duty springs have a free hight of 11 1/8" . I do not know the coil diameter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
Can you tell the build date of my '62 FI by the VIN number?  The VIN ends with S107588.

Thanks
Steve

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Your car was built the first week of March probably on Thursday March the 1st of 1962.

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The first Corvette on March 1st was #7655 and the first Corvette built on March 2nd was #7724, so most likely March 1st 1962.

 

 

 

**********

Hi Guys!

 Thank for your help the last time.

 I have a ’58 car with oversized screw holes for door panels.  Problem is the oversize screws are loose.

 Question:  how can this be fixed?  I understand to fix fiberglass, both sides has to be sanded and roughed up to adhere new fiberglass layup to prepare for new holes, but I don’t think the inside of the inner door can be reached.

 Aloha,

Eric

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  Enlarge the holes in the door, insert plastic anchors (some are square & some are round) into the door.  Now' you can use the normal screw to hold your door panel on.

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  You don’t necessarily have to fiberglass repair both sides of the hole in the door panel as fiberglass repairing of the outside of the door panel hole is sufficient.  However it is like putting a band aid on the problem as it is usually just a one time repair that will strip out over time.  NCRS member Joe Calgagno used to market a metal repair kit that was a fantastic solution to the problem but I don’t think they are available anymore.  To make up this kit on your own is a real no brainer.  Obtain some real thin sheet metal from Lowes or Home Depot about 1/16th thick and cut it into pieces approximately ½ inch by 5/8ths inch and then drill two small holes for small rivets that will attach the metal pieces over the bad door panel holes.  You could skip this rivet step and fiberglass the metal pieces to the door panel.  With this repair you are now putting the door panel screws into metal and not a weak fiberglass repair.  I do this all the time and it works just great.

**********

I have a 54 Corvette vin number E54S003218, car has a top flight award but, major deduction was for engine block stamping. (Stamping improper, insistent?)
casting number, 911
casting date, C114 march 11, 1954
engine stamping, 04I95I7 F54YG My guestion is what date should the stamping be.
Per Corvette Birthday Book, Production date is 5-27-54.
Any help is appreciated.
Rick

From Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

Hi Rick'
     I have a '54 S/N 3329 which came with engine S/N 0727180. Mine was built in June '54. So, your dates look correct, however, the engine S/N would have been assembled approximately in March '54 based S/N's listed in Noland Adam's book and should have an engine S/N around 070XXXX, not 0419517. There are some production sequence abnormalities which can be explained since some cars have been found to have the original engines built 1-3 months before the car build date. All engines were run up on a test stand before installation. If there were any leaks, noises or other abnormalities, they were sent back to assembly for correction and when repaired, put back in the cycle. Obviously, this could take time. My current engine S/N is 0434847 which was assembled in about April of '54.
Hope this helps,
Bruce Fuhrman 

**********

 

 

Hello,
As I continue my search I realize there is huge amounts of wrong info being
posted on the web.............damn.
Stamped to the engine block-passengers side front on block F1018EB-I have found out(I think) what most of this means-F=Flint-though another web site said that Flint V-8's were designated with a V. 10-Oct.? 18-18th day?-EB-E=Corvette?  but what is the B for? I am so confused;and tired of asking.
Appreciate any help that you can offer.
                                            Thank You,
                                              Dan

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Advisor:  (You need to) Buy the NCRS judging manual!

From: Doug Prince, Socal Advisor:  Your engine was built in Flint, MI. October 18th and the engine is for a 283 c.i. passenger car with dual four barrel carbs and solid lifter cam that was 270 horsepower.  1958 Corvette engine codes for fuel injection was as follows:  CR 250 horsepower hydraulic cam with manual transmission, DH 250 horsepower hydraulic cam with Powerglide transmission and CS 290 horsepower solid lifter cam with manual transmission.  Sorry to tell you that you have the wrong engine block!

Dan,
 
It is not possible to determine what your motor (block) came out of without knowing the casting # and casting date of the block. Your decoding of the F1018 is correct.  However, EB is a suffex code that was used for several years and indicates the following applications.
 
1957                     283     passenger car  270hp
 
1958 thru 1961    283     passenger car   turboglide with 4 barrel carb
 
 
The only thing I can say with certainty  is that your block is not original to your car.
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Hello, 
 
I was changing my axle bearings and pulled the ham out (not a limited-slip), to flush out the rear housing when I found one of the side carrier gears with chip damage to the outer end surfaces of the teeth.  
Upon close inspection, it seems that none of the other gears have evidence of related damage and so wondered if this gear may have been used by some unscrupulous previous owner to patch up the differential for resale??
 
Anyway, I wouldn't mind finding a compatible 3.70 differential assembly to prepare as necessary for my car and wondered what other Chevs used this same unit.
 
Any help will be greatly appreciated.
 
Thanks,
Ger

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

These rear ends were used in 56-62 Corvettes, 55-64 Chevrolet, 62-64 or65 Chevy Nova.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I'M FINISHING RESTORATION ON A 1960 AND NOTICED THAT ABOUT 18" FROM THE BACK OF THE FRONT FENDERS A HUMP ON TOP OF BOTH FRONT FENDERS OF THE CAR.
I TRIED ADJUSTING THE BODY SHIMS BUT THAT MADE NO DIFFERENCE,DO YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS THAT MIGHT HELP ME CORRECT THIS PROBLEM? I HAVE CHECKED WITH OTHER OWNERS IN THE AREA AND THAT PROBLEM IS NOT VISIBLE ON THEIRS. THANKS---RON

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Chapter advisor:  Shim the front bumper brackets so you are not pulling rearward on the body when you tighten the bumper bolts. 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Ron,
 
I suspect the reason you have not received a response to your question is that it is impossible to identify the problem without seeing the car. My guess is one of the following:
 
1.  18" from the rear of the front fender is the point where the inner fender is bonded to the outer fender. The bonding material can cause a line across the fender at the bonding point, but not a "hump". I see this problem on 56-57 cars , but  not later ones.
 
2.   A front end may have been spliced onto the car at this point and poor body work may have resulted in the hump.
 
I doubt shimming will solve your problem. I would carefully inspect the front end fiberglass for prior repair work to help identify the cause of the problem. The easiest solution most likely will be sanding/grinding the area smooth and repainting the front end.
 
Again, I am only guessing. A competent Corvette body shop can provide a more definitive answer.
 
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Hi

I am having trouble with my brake lights working intermittently.  I know the problem is in the steering column where the turn signals and horn all come together.  However, I can't get it adjusted where the brake lights work and the horn doesn't sound when I turn the wheel.  Do you have a solution to this problem?  I'd welcome ideas for how to fix this problem permanently.  I've had this worked on multiple times.  It works for a while and then the problem returns.  Thus, I'm always worrying that the brake light aren't working.

Thanks for your help.

Jo

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  If you are using the original cancelling cam mechanism it is probably completely worn out.  Buy a current reproduction but KEEP the original cancelling cam spring as the spring that comes with the repro is Chinese and is not nearly as strong as the original and will not cancel the turn signal after the turn has been performed.  Be sure that you are using a new reproduction turn signal switch and make sure that all the connections are nice and tight at the steering column.  Be sure to clean and lubricate the cancelling cam wheels that are in the turn signal housing.

**********

Hello,

 1962 Corvette Headlight Switch.  How do you get the knob out of the switch? 

 I have a new switch and the nut wrench to get it out of the dash.

 Thanks,

 John

From: Max Brockshouse, SACC President:  Reach up under the dash, feel the light switch. on the top will be a small button with a spring holding it out, press the button down while pulling out on the knob, this will release the knob/rod assembly.  The knob rod will be three sided with a grove on the end/tip.  Use a LARGE screwdriver to remove the bezel on the out side of the dash, this will allow you to remove the light switch assembly.  To replace the knob into the switch, hold the button while inserting the knob, otherwise the rod will not seat in the switch assembly.

**********

Hi,
  I am restoring my 1960 Corvette rims. Is the entire wheel painted the same as the body color?
Frank

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Frank,
 
1960 Corvette wheels were dipped in semi gloss black paint. Then the front of the wheel was painted body color. Body color overspray can (and should be) seen on the backsides of the wheel.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********
I am restoring my 59 (owned since 1970, off the road for last 25 years, 77k miles) and have done a lot of reading/research (including much of Noland Adams guide and the Baird/Howey handbook). Today's questions (among the many) are about the suspension. First, the consensus appears to be to replace the coil springs BUT other than NOS (haven't looked for them yet) do all the replacement springs cause the front end to sit too high? Second question is, is there a way to evaluate the original springs or do I assume (as appears to be the case) that ALL 50 year old springs are now sagged somewhat and should just be replaced. Final question, is there one supplier that is most recommended for these front end parts, hopefully made in the USA?? Thanks, Barry

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Advisor:  Most original springs have some sag.  Check the assembly manual for front end curb height to determine how much sag your springs have.  All new springs, in my experience, are too tall.  There are many original used springs out there for your car from guys like David Sokolowski, 310-329-5334. Hope that helps.  Mike

**********

I have a 1962 Corvette 340 HP with a 4 speed tranny, I need to change the tranny oil and I have a couple of questions.
 
I noticed 2 plugs on the right side of tranny one low and one slightly higher, I'm assuming the lower is drain plug and the higher is the fill plug, is this correct?
 
Should I use Valvoline Synchromesh fluid or stick to 90w oil, I have read the specs and noticed that the 4 speed tranny has sync on all 4 gears, I'm assuming that they are brass due to the age of the car, what is the recommended fluid?
 
Any help would be appreciated.
 
Thanks
 
Robert

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Advisor:  You have the plug arrangement correct.  Fill until it runs our of upper plug...about 2 1/4 pints.  Unless your trans is shimmed tight and is difficult to shift into 2nd when cold I'd use the 90 weight (or 85-140).  If its a tight trans, use the GM manual trans fluid (more like 30w).  Mike

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

yes, the lower plug is the drain plug. I have always used 90 wt gear oil and never had any problems. However, I do live in S. Calif. and never have to deal with cold weather which may make a difference.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********
I have a block with casting num. 3756519 and engine code num. FOI28M could you tell what its out of? thanks, frank

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:

3756519 is a 283 block from 1958-1962.  Suffex "M" indicates 1958-1962 trademaster truck with manual trans. "F" indicates the block was cast in Flint, Mi. and 0128 is the build date........Jan.28. Can not identify the year without the block casting date.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Do you have any parts blowups or rebuild information for a washer pump assembly for a 1961 corvette

 Thanks for your help

 Ray

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

To the best of my knowledge, the only person who has parts and rebuilds C-1 washer pumps is Tom Maxwell     301-948-9481    tmax61@msn.com.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Folks,
I have a 59 corvette which has a sealed air cleaner.  How does one go about properly cleaning it?

From: Brad Bean, Vice President of SACC:  Not sure about others, but I have an early '60 which has the same sealed air cleaner. Once every few years, I soak mine for a few hours, in kerosene and then rinse and flush it with clean water. Seems to work for me.

Brad

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 A friend has a 1958 corvette that has been painted more than once. He wanted to know what the factory colors might have been. I found a website " corvette history 1958" in their article they said the 58s had a code plate on the engine side of the cowl. This had body identification, production build date and paint and trim codes. Now this has lead to some disagreement as to if it is there or not. Evidently it is not on his 58. Could you tell us if it is true?

 

thanks Jim

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Jim,

 The trim plate exists, but the first year for the factory installed trim plate was 1963, when it was located under the glove box door next to the serial number plate.

 There might be a hidden body color name in the trunk area. Remove the large cardboard panel in the front of the trunk area. Near or under the right trunk hinge the body color was written using a large lumber crayon (usually green). The name was covered by overspray when the trunk was painted. Using a quarter, scratch away the paint to reveal the color name. Ivory means white, but red, blk, blue, or char (charcoal) are obvious.

 Good Luck,

 Noland Adams

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  While the passenger cars & trucks did have the data plate you refer to, production Corvettes did not have any info attached anywhere except the Serial Number plate until 1963.  The only ways I know to determine the original color are to: 1) find an inconspicuous area and carefully remove the layers of paint until you get to the last one; and/or 2) take a quarter and lightly scrape the paint off of the trunk side of vertical divider panel between the trunk and decklid compartment.  Many, if not most of the 58-62s had the body paint color written in grease pencil there.  Note that (I believe on the later Solid Axles) the color might have been scribbled on the vertical panel in the passenger compartment behind one of the seat backs.  Since the color was written in grease pencil the paint would not adhere; hence a careful scraping usually reveals the color.
 
Bill Herron

**********

My generator on my 1960 restored Vette has no numbers, obviously a replacement. Is there a way to get it stamped??
 
Thanks,
 
Charlie
 
From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  
Corvette generators have a aluminum tag which is stamped with the part # and assembly date and rivited to the generator. Any of the Corvette parts suppliers should be able to provide you with a tag. You will need to give them the horse power and serial # or assembly date of your car for the tag to be made correctly. Note that the old rivits have usually been broken off by a rebuilder and you may want to have another rebuilder install the new tag to avoid damaging the generator.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

How do I tell original paint colors on my 62'.
Thanks in advance.
 
Joe

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Long story short; take the passenger seat out, then scratch gently until you find green wax marks under the paint.  It will have your paint color the Corvette left the St. Louis plant spelled out.  Also, look in hard to reach areas inside your Corvette for spots that have never been repainted over the years.

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

 I have a 62 that will not start. When I try to start the car there is nothing, no clicking sound, nothing. I have replaced the battery, starter, starter solenoid, ignition switch. The wiring harness is about 5 years old. I am stumped. What can I do next? Is there something I am missing? I sthere some test I can do?

 Thanks,

 Ron

 

From: Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:    

I guess the first thing I'd ask is does anything else work?  (ie headlamps).  If nothing works I'd start with the battery cables and trace them back (neg for proper ground & pos for proper attachment) and work my way further as necessary.  If you have working lights I'd be looking at the starting wiring circuit even though you've replaced some things - reproductions sometimes are not as well manufactured as the General's originals.
 
Bill Herron

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Assuming the starter, solenoid, battery, ign switch and STARTER HARNESS are all good, I would do the following......simple stuff 1st. If the simple things don't fix the problem I would assume that one of the other components in the starting circuit is defective.
 
* is there a battery shut off? They can be defective or wear out and when they do you will get nothing.....no clicking or anything. Remove it and connect your negitive cable directly to the battery.
 
*Check the negitive battery cable ground .......it should be connected to a starter bolt @ the bell housing and should be clean and tight.
 
* Check the starter harness @ the ignition switch to confirm it is pluged in correctly..........it is possible to plug it in so that one of the 3 prongs is not engaged.
 
* Check for power at the solenoid......if no power you have a bad battery or cables.... and starter switch....no power would indicate problem with starter harness.
 
* if you have a remote starter switch, you can bypass the ign switch and harness......if it turns over the problem would be in the switch or harness.
 
*We have a member here in S. Calif. who had the same problem..........turned our to be a bad battery. Check the battery with a voltmeter........it should read about 14 volts
 
Any competent repair shop could most likely resolve this problem quickly. The C-1 starting circuit is quite simple and the shop would have the right tools to analize the problem. I would be interested to hear how your problem is resolved.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********
I have completely restored my 1958 corvette with a 285 fuel injection system.  The engine was purchased and rebuilt in Tilton, NH and the fuel injection was purchased from Jack Podell.  We first had a problem with the exhaust overheating and Jack suggested that we advance the timing.  We did and it fixed the exhaust overheating problem.  Now the engine starts fine and runs well until it gets hot.  Once the engine gets hot, it runs rough.

I don't know what to do.  My life savings are in the car.

Regards,
Jerry

From:  Doug Prince, Fuel Injection Tech Advisor, SoCal Chapter of SACC:  My name is Doug Prince and I am the fuel injection technical advisor for the Southern California Chapter of SACC.  I have well over 30 years experience rebuilding and restoring Rochester Fuel Injection Units so I think I know a little bit about them.  Jerry Arcaro references a fuel injection unit that I do not recognize as his 1958 Corvette should have either a 7014900 or 7014900R fuel injection unit depending on whether it is a hydraulic cam 250 horsepower car or a solid lifter 290 horsepower car.  That said retarded ignition timing will cause the engine to run poorly and cause the exhaust manifolds to run extremely hot.  I have seen them turn red from heat and apparently Jack Podell was able to steer him in the right direction by advancing the ignition timing.  Starting up cold and running good and then running rough after warm up could be a function of a number of problems.  If the automatic choke and fast idle assembly is not working properly the fuel injection will continue to run in the cold start mode and the fuel meter will continue to be in full rich position and the ratio lever will be on the power stop.  One must observe that the ratio lever leaves the power stop position and then swings over to the economy stop position. Running rough after warm up could also be that the economy stop is too rich.  Another cause could be that the idle mixture screw is out of adjustment and is too rich.  Turning it clock wise will lean out the idle mixture.  The Chevrolet ST12 Service Manual has an excellent section pertaining to fuel injection and trouble shooting.  Jerry may have to rely on some outside expertise.

**********

Hello,
Although I am not a member yet...but will be shortly, I wonder if you could answer this question?
 
I recently completed a frame off restoration on my very low mileage, garage kept, 59 Vette. All work was done by me. While putting the original rear bumpers back on the car, I noticed there was a date stamp on the inside of each bumper in black ink. 
The stamp reads APR 22 AM. It would have appeared to me that this would have washed off over the years but it hasn't. It is a low mileage car and I am the 3rd owner and it's always been garage kept. I have all documentation and receipts (including copy of the original title and the original Bill of Sale) back to the original owner and am confident these are absolutely the original GM issued (not re-chromed) bumpers that came on the car and the car has never been in an accident. In all the restoration books that I have ever read, I have never seen mention of these date stamps. (Could this be a new discovery?) The APR 22 is obviously the date but I don't know what the AM stands for unless is was the morning shift...I don't know. Has anyone seen these date stamps before and can you shed any light on them? I have pictures attached. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 
P.S. I posted this question on the NCRS website but had little or no response. Have you ever heard of these date stamps? I wrote to Bob Beard who wrote the 1958 to 1960 Corvette restoration & judging book and he had never heard of these date stamps. He asked that I send him pictures to be included in his next book, which I did. Any info will be very much appreciated.
 
Thank you. 

 
Wayne

 

**********

I have a 1954 corvette and am getting it ready for NCRS judging September 16 and 17. My wiper arms may not b correct. They have TRICO with the letters smaller on each side and numbers as follows 2668725-2691186 CAL 1942-48-52BR. 546431 ad other patent pending numbers.

Thanks for your help,

Tommy

From: Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:  The date stamps on your pics look quite a bit like the ones I've seen on the instruments in my 56, 57 and 58 over the years.  I feel that those date stamps are correct and original, given your car's history.  It doesn't surprise me at all that for the most part they have not survived the passage of time.  What's the serial number of your car?  I'll bet that the assembly date was May, 1960 or later.

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Chevrolet dated many parts for traceability purposes. I have seen date stamps on trunk and deck lids ( under the hinge), door posts, speedometers, clocks, door panels, frames and wiper motors,  but never on bumpers. Living in S. California I have had the opportunity to see/inspect many original, non rusty cars over the years and have attempted to take note of unusual markings etc. Sorry I can't confirm that the dates were put on by the factory or vender, but it certainly could be the case. You didn't indicate the Vin # or build date of your car...........it must have a build date after April 22 ( May, June, July) if the stamp is original.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC:  

Hi Tommy,
    I have a '54 with what I believe are the original wiper arms. I looked at the drivers side info. It has the following:
"TRICO"- "SOME OF PATENTS. 202 0244 214 2146396.......... ends with 2564819. CAN. 1936-38-42-43-45-49. BR. 470652.......PATS PEND. MADE IN USA" All this info, except the TRICO requires a magnifying glass to read. I believe the NCRS judges may only verify the TRICO and a series on very small #'s??? 
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello, I was wondering if anyone could tell me what width Crager rims and size BFG radial T/A tires will fit my 61? I want to keep a 15" diameter.
Many thanks.

From: Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:  

I have 6" rims (not Cragar but Kelsey-Hayes/Buick Skylark wires) and 215-65R15 radials with no rubbing problems to speak of (assuming "normal" driving, but don't ask Doc H about that...) on my 57.  I believe your 61 has better rear wheel well/body clearance so you might be able to fit an even wider rim - BUT - I would be concerned with 1) front wheel clearance with anything wider and 2) proper rear springs so there's no body interference.
 
Bill Herron
#229

 

 

**********

I would like to know if it is possible that a July dated starter #1107233 2 g 23 be use on
a early 1963 corvette? help will be greatly appreciated. thanks

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

According to NCRS, all 1963 Corvettes used srarter # 1107243. 63's used a different bell housing (than 62's) which did  not have holes for starter bolts. All 63 starters bolted up into the block. I believe it is possible to change the gear end of the 62 starter so it would work with a 63 bell housing.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Can you provide a source for a quartz movement for my 60 Vette clock?
Also, instuctions on the job wouild be appreciated.
 
Thanks.
 
Dennis

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

I have used VALLEY VETTES ( Mike Poirier) in San Diego for many years. He is a very nice guy and his work is outstanding.......and a quartz conversion is very reasonable. 619-461-1952
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Since I’ve had the car, my ’60 trunk lid has always been sitting about ½” high at the driver’s side front edge. I thought at first it was just the way things are with the fiberglass body, but it’s starting to bother me now. Looks like someone may have overloaded the trunk at some time and forced the lid down, bending the horseshoe shaped hinge bracket. Is that possible?

The deck lid and passenger side trunk lid fit as well as can be expected, weatherstrip is not the issue. I can’t find any method of adjustment other than shims at the bottom of the hinge tower, but that would affect the nice, flush deck lid as well and besides, couldn’t make up ½”.

These hinge brackets look too sturdy to bend without breaking a lot of other things. Have you had experience with this? Suggestions?

Thanks,

Herman

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal advisor:  

I would suggest buying a trunk/deck lid shim kit from one of the Corvette parts suppliers. There are three bolts on your drivers side trunk lid hinge........insert 2 shims in the bottom bolt.........it will make the top of the lid "dive down". A 1/2 inch is a lot to make up, but if this helps and does not create fit problems elsewhere you can continue to shim until the problem is solved. Worst case scenario....you will improve the fit. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********
Just a quick question. I have a 1961 Corvette and it may need a camshaft replacement. If the radiator assembly is removed, will the cam come out without pulling the engine out?
 
Thanks,
 
Dale

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Dale,
 
The simple answer is yes. But,you must remove the intake manifold, drop the front of the oil pan, remove the water pump, front engine support and the timing cover. Be sure to support the front of the motor because the 4 bolts holding the water pump also support the engine.

 

**********
Hi I need to replace a set of  seat covers on my newly acquired 1960 Corvette, any recommendation on price and quality please before I get it shipped to Australia.

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  You can purchase the correct seat covers from Al Knock ( the manufacturer) ,Corvette Central or Paragon reproductions. The all come from Al Knock, but Paragon will give you a discount if you ask.

 

 

**********

I am wanting to restore the C-1 steering gear box in my 1962 Corvette and I was reading an article on how to do so.  It mentioned in the article that there were special tools required but never said which ones they were or where they were used nor where to obtain them. 
 
Could you assist me in this area? 
 
Regards,
 
Darrell

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Darrel,
 
I have rebuilt many steering boxes over the years. I have never replaced the upper bearing race because it requires a special tool to remove the old one....and no one has it. All other bearings and races are easily replaceable using common garage tools. There are three hard parts to this job.........removing the steering box/ column from the car, cleaning the steering box and re instalation. Be sure to buy the upper column bearing and the 3 column seals. NOTE.....the firewall retaining plate only goes on one way. If you reverse it, you'll be removing the column again. I speak from experience. I always adjust the rebuilt box on the bench by feel. I don't have an inch pound puller. Once it is in the car, I readjust the sector to my liking. There should be a little drag in the center position. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Need a little help.  I’ve had my baby for 38 years.  Recently found some brittle wires in the ignition and under the dash wiring.  Replaced the whole thing with the correct colors and gauge wire.  When I removed the wires from the back of the Ammeter, I found that they were divided evenly between the right and left posts.  My wiring diagram shows that the black 12g from the battery terminal on the starter solenoid connects to the left post (viewing from the firewall) and the other four red wires are connected to the right post.  Another reference says exactly the opposite.  I’m inclined to go with the diagram from Chilton, black on left, red on right.  Any advice on my gut instinct will be greatly appreciated.  I’m anxious to get hooked up and start rolling again.  Thanks, Howard

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Howard,
It should be black on the right and red on the left looking from the firewall.If you connect it backwards you won't hurt anything. The gage will read in reverse. Is there any reason you didn't purchase a reproduction starter harness instead of building your own? Good luck.

**********
can you tell me what rear ends were available on a 62 vette? and my 62 has power windows , how can i tell if they are original or have been added?  thanks   Don

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Don,
 
250 and 300hp cars came standard with 3.36 open rear end. 3.08 was available with a 4 speed.
 
340 and 360hp cars with 3 speed got the 3.36 open as well.
 
340 and 360 with 4 speed got 3.70 open as standard and optional 3.08, 3.55,  4.11 and 4.56.
 
positraction was available with any gear choice and 3.55, 4.11 and 4.56 were available in positraction only.
 
 
995 62 Corvettes came equiped with power windows. Original switches have rounded corners and later switches have square corners. Also there should be a metal conduit between the door and the door jam to shield the power window wiring and a 40 amp curcuit breaker mounted on the fire wall above the heater with 12 gage red wire coming from the power window harness to one side and a similar wire connected to the other side of the breaker going to the starter motor.
 
Hope this info helps.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
First of all,I have really enjoyed the Corvette Restoration & Technical Guide. Can you please make some comments about the amount of allowable sterring wheel play. I"am restoring a 59. I have the body  off and I"m well on the way, but I do not know what extent to go on the sterring box because when I drove the car the sterring was not bad except for the little bit of play. Also I do not know what lube to put in the box?  Thanks for the help.  Eddie

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Inspect the gears for damage and wear......minor damage will create steering problems. Both the sector and worm gears should be convex.......NOT CONCAVE. Concave indicates significant wear which you may or may not be able to adjust out. If the gears look ok I would replace the bearings and seals ( I don't replace the upper race because I have never  figured out how to remove it) The C-1 corvette shop manual ST 12 explains the rebuild and adjustments in good detail. I use 680 weight gear oil in my steering boxes.
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Dear SACC:
 
What can be done to improve the handling on our curvy and hilly highways in Hawaii?  I have a ’58 with newer leave springs/2-inch lower block/urethane sway bar bushings/replace gas shocks in year 2000, but I hope to keep suspensions stock. 
 
Thanks for the tech help.
 
Aloha,
Eric

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Eric,
 
You could add radial tires, slightly wider wheels,a 60-62 rear sway bar, 59-62 traction bars, a fast steering adaptor, front wheel roller bearings, change the kingpin bushings to roller bearings( a shop here in S. Cal does that) and disc brakes. But you will still have a 53 year old car with 60+ year old suspension technology. In it's day, the 58 was probably the beat handling American car built.
 
Chip Werstein



**********
Hi

I'd like to know the birthdate and place of my 58 Vette. Number J585106771. can you help?

Bob

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:
Your 1958 would have been assembled 7 May 1958.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

 

 

**********

What can be done to improve the handling on our curvy and hilly highways in Hawaii?  I have a ’58 with newer leave springs/2-inch lower block/urethane sway bar bushings/replace gas shocks in year 2000, but I hope to keep suspensions stock. 

 Thanks for the tech help.

 Aloha,
Eric

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi;  If you have the original type tires on the car it will never handle very good.  Switch to Radials and a 20575R15 tire.  If it still does not handle the way you want it to go to a 6 inch rim.  There are several aftermarket wheels on the market ( watch the back set as it is critical ).  Also look back about 4 years in the Club magazine for a article on wheels written by me.  It uses a 6 inch wheel with the radials.  The handling is amazing. Should be about $500.00 + or - ready to mount tires.  If you have any questions contact me.  Enjoy the car. Thanks Larry

 

**********


What is the routing for heater hoses on a 60? Does the ¾ go under the motor/waterpump mount or can it run along side it without getting into the belt? A picture would be nice. All of the diagrams I’ve seen are not very clear. Thanks Gene

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  The hose goes in front of the motor mount.  What I do is use a black zip tie and tie it to the radio ground strap from the motor mount.  This works great as it will get into the belt if not done.   Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

**********

Hi
 
I am a member. Hope you can help me. My gas gauge always reads full, so I replaced the sending unit on the gas tank. It is still reads full all the time. I can change the gauge, but I'd like to be sure that I need a gauge and it's not a grounding problem or something else. I thought I read somewhere the fuel gauge had something to do with the turn signals? I have changed the turn signal cancelling unit. It seemed about this time the gauge started to show. fill.
 
Any ideas?
 
Thanks, Bob

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Bob,
 
1. check for power at the gage...... pink wire with ignition switch on .(note: there is no power going to the sending unit.)
 
2. check for loose connections at gage.
 
3. Check brown wire at sending unit to make sure it is not touching the black ground wire,
 
4. Check for instrument cluster ground wire @ instrument housing....usually attached at the speedometer bezel attaching screw, drivers side.
 
5. Check for main harness ground wire .....black wire, white stripe....at left valve cover.
 
 
If it still doesn't work, the problem must be the gage. Valley vettes in San Diego can rebuild it 619-461-1952. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer os SACC:  Hi  First check the fuel gauge in and of itself.  You have a hot wire and a ground wire.  Determine which is which and remove the ground wire.  Then make sure the terminal is clean and run a jumper wire direct to the ground side of the battery. If then the gauge still reads full then either the gauge is bad or a connection is bad from the sending unit. Next activate the turn signals to see if it has a incorrect reading. in your steering column you may have a grounding problem.   Grounding is a real problem in these older Corvettes.  Check all grounds.  Good Luck  enjoy the car.   Thanks Larry

**********

I would like a softer ride for my '62.
Is there a shock absorber that you would recommend?
 
Thanks.
 
Ken

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:

Ken,
 
I use current issue AC Delco gas shocks available from any good auto parts store. They are black and look original and give a very nice ride. However, new shocks will not compensate for damaged or worn out front/rear springs or other suspension parts.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Hi,I would like to know if the steering column and steering box can be removed from the car , and how do you get out? I have a 1957 corvette and my steering box is going bad.Is this something that can be done in the car ? Thanks JIM

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Jim,
 
I have been attempting to research this question. I am familiar with this job on 58-62, but 53-57 is much more complicated. First of all, the steering box can not be rebuilt in the car. The column and box must be removed as a unit. I always remove the left exhaust maifold and the pitman arm from the box to provide more clearence.
 
Once the box is loose at the frame, firewall and dash, you must slide it forward enough for the column to clear the dash........this is not as easy as it sounds because there is interference at the inner fender..........and it still may not come out. I have been told that the radiator and grill must be removed so the box/column can slide out thru the grill opening, but I can't confirm that. Also, be aware of the column opening in the dash as it is VERY easy to crack or break it during removal and installation.
 
I have done this job on two 57's, but the body was off the frame both times. It was still a very difficult job and I did not come thru the grill opening. I suggest you contact a couple reputable Corvette repair shops to research the job more before you jump into it. I would be interested to hear what you find out. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful.
 
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Recently, I purchased a Leaf spring re-build kit from Corvette Corner, for my '61 Vette. The instructions indicated that a "Signode Banding Tool / SRC-5823" was to be used to crimp the bands around leafs.  My research on the SRC-5823 is that it is a 5/8" single reverse notch joint type.
 
If I could find one of these to rent I would, but I refuse to pay full price for a new one. 
 (~$400)
 My questions are:
  1. is a single reverse notch joint type correct for the band?
  2. can another type and/or model number of banding tool be used?
 Thank you for any help you can provide!
 
Norm

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Norm,
 
The SRC5823 is the correct crimping tool for C-1 rear springs. Any truck suspension repair shop should have one...........or any company who uses 5/8 metal banding for strapping . I bought one from a local construction supply house........not a Signode, but it looks/works just like it. Another friend of mine found an SRC 5823 cheap on ebay.
 
If you are attempting to restore your springs to NCRS standards with stainless steel bands, the crimping is the easy part.The bands which are sold by the various Corvette parts suppliers are too short....and they know it. Once you wrap it around the spring, there is not enough material remaining for the tentioning tool to grab and pull the strap tight. It takes me, 2 helpers with homemade tools to tension and crimp  the bands.
 
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Hello,
 
I was wondering if the 4 speed option for the 1959 Corvette was available from day one, or they produced only 3 speed cars initially.  Mine was built on December 18, 1958.  I do not have the original transmission and didn’t know if it would/could have come with a 3-speed or 4 speed.
 
Any help would be appreciated!

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  The 4-speed option for Corvette became available approximately April 15, 1957 (about two weeks after my 57 was built...), so all 59s could have had one.

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Dane,
 
In 59 (and 58 for that matter) 4 speeds were available from day one as an extra cost option.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

Hi-
 
I am restoring a 1960 vette and have a couple of questions.
 
-is the steering column painted the same color as the interior in 1960?
 
-how do you repair the license plate lights that are attached to the bumper. There are rivets holding a housing that keeps the lens in position. In order to replace the lens, do I drill out the rivets and replace with new or can they be pried out.
 
Thanks in advance for any advice,
 
Jim

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  The interior section of the steering column is interior color while the portion in the engine compartment is semi-gloss black.

The rivets will have to be drilled out and replaced. Make sure you have correct replacement rivets, before drilling out existing ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
 
I am looking at purchasing a 1962 Corvette  the info below has been provided:
 
1962 Corvette VIN # 20867S104263 Correct date coded 327/300 hp engine. Casting number 3782870. Date code K161. December 1961 vehicle build date. 4 speed transmission.
 
I am interested in it as a driver, but would like to know what all the codes mean.  As a driver any suggestions on what fuel to use?  87,89,93??  any fuel additive needed.
 
Thanks
 
Greg

 

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Chapter Board Member:  

Greg,
 
1962 Corvette # 4263 was built 12-19-61. The 870 block is the correct casting for a 62 327 motor. This block was cast 11-16-61 (K 16 1) which tells me it is most likely the original block. Use the highest octane pump gas available in your area with 1/2 qt. of aautomatic transmission fluid per full tank. This will prevent corrosion on the carb.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Hello,
 
I was referred to your club in trying to get an answer to a C1 Corvette question for my dad.  He owns a 1957 Corvette and needs to replace the original tires, but would like to go back with something larger for better handling etc.  He (we) can't find anyone who can tell us how large of a new wheel and tire size setup he can put on WITHOUT having to make any modifications to the car.  Can you or any of your members possibly help?
 
Thank you, in advance, for your time and help.
 
Scott

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC:  

I have just replaced my '54 tires with Diamond Back radial tires and am VERY pleased with them. The original size is the same as the '57, 670X15. I suggest you go on line and google Diamond Back tires. They have all the info you need to select the proper tire.
Bruce

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi:  If you go back with the original bias tires it is not going to handle much better than it does now.  Coker tire has them. Better tire is a radial 205-75R15 and not the inexpensive ones.  Best is this about 4 years ago I wrote an article in the SACC magazine regarding a 6 inch rim. A back copy can be obtained for our editor. It has the correct bolt pattern and the back set.  Should run you $400 to 500 for a set of 4.  I have them on my 62 and the difference of handling is amazing.  The 205-75R15 is engineered for a 6 inch rim. Watch out for aftermarket rims as the back set may be incorrect.  Good luck and enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  

!957 Corvettes came with 5"wide x15" wheels as standard equipment; a 5.5" wheel was available with the heavy-duty brake option.  That being said, my 57 has been running 6" wide Kelsey-Hayes wire wheels (originally from a 1954 Buick Skylark) since circa 1963.  When I purchased the car from the original owner's widow 20 years ago the only change I made was adding 215.65R15 radials with only the occasional rear tire rubbing during hard cornering with a fully loaded trunk and passenger.  For your purposes a 205.75R15 radial tire should fit the original wheels and wheel wells with room to spare. (Note: radials make the car sooooo much more enjoyable to drive!)  If you're looking for newer rims be careful of two things: the offset (where the bolt holes are in relation to the rim) and especially the fact that non-Corvette 4.75" bolt pattern rims most likely do not have the bumps or dimples on the outer part to hold the stock wheel covers on - you might be watching a familiar hubcap roll by you!
 
"Sebring"Bill Herron

**********

Included with my 62 was a radiator that hopefully is the original.  the numbers in the cast inlet and outlet are: inlet is 3150896 and 01030 (looks like a date code) and outlet is 31560897 and 01031.  What is it for?
Pat 1277

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi  The 62 Radiator is an aluminum cross flow and part number 3150916 the supply tank is number 3151016. If it is an early car ( before S.N. 5,000 ) the number will be stamped into the top of the Radiator to the left of center. Characters were about 1/4 inch high.  Form that point forward to the end of 62's they used foil label with the date of manufacture also on the foil.  Go back and check your numbers because you should have a 7 digit number ( last one has a 8 digit number.).  I have no idea what the numbers are from.  Good Luck  enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC:  The 62 radiator is an aluminum cross flow style. Early cars had a blue& silver aluminum Harrison tag screwed to the top right hand side if the radiator with part # and date..........later cars used a foil tag glued in the same location. The cast inlet # 3150896 was used on both 61&62 radiators, however they differed in that the 61 inlet had a square boss on the top. The NCRS 61-62 judging manual shows this very clearly.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 

I FOLLOWED THE ADVICE FOR THE LAST C1 FUEL GAUGE PROBLEM BY RUNNING A SECOND GROUND WIRE FROM THE DASH POD TO THE ENGINE BLOCK BUT THE FUEL GAUGE STILL READS 1/8 UNTIL THE BRAKE PEDDLE IS PRESSED, THAN IT READS CORRECTLY.  WHAT NOW?
PAT 1277

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi  I believe you still have a grounding problem.  (1) recheck your new wire from fuel gauge to the ground it must me a clean surface on both ends.  (2) move the ground wire from the dash pod to the ground side of the fuel gauge ( 3) Your brake lights may not be grounded correctly.  ( 4) check all grounds on the car.   The reason I still believe you have a grounding problem is that the fuel gauge works when it is grounded.   If none of these works contact me.   Thanks Larry

 

**********
Hi

Still waiting for my membership response .

I've recently had my 58 Vette tuned (283ci and 245 hp with dual 4brl carters and dual point distributor). New points,plugs,wires, condenser, rotor, dual points, all timed.

In first gear I"'m ok but when I get into second gear and hit 2500 rpm or 3rd gear at 3000 rpm or higher, the car chokes or hesitates.

I've been told by a local mechanic to replace the distributor and the carbs. I've done some additional research and I've been told it could the vacuum advance that needs to be replaced in the distributor.

I love the Vette but it's not running right. Can you offer some help?

Thanks, Bob

From:  Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi;  First go to a shop that understands carburetor's and vacuum advances.  ( Not your average shop).  It could be any of the three or parts of the three.  You need to have a scope analysis first.  Let me know Thanks Larry

 

 

**********
Hi

I have applied for membership about a month ago but no response from the club yet. Hope to hear soon. However that' s not the point of the email.

I have a 1958 corvette. My parking brake or hand brake or emergency brake ( pick a name) is working but the red dash light stays on all the time. I checked and there's a switch mounted with a bracket on the shaft of the bake itself. It very old probably original. As easy as it is to find replacement parts for the Vette, I've checked every Corvette catalogue as well as diagrams of the hand brake and there's no switch to be found. Am I missing something?

Any information you have I'd really appreciate it

Thanks, Bob

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi:  The hand brake has a switch attached to the top of brake handle rod under the dash.  It is about 1 inch wide, 1/2 inch thick and about 2 inches tall.  It activates the light on the dash.  Try Corvette Central they should have one.  If not run a wanted ad for the switch.  It is easy to install.  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********
I am in middle of restoring a 1960 (# 00867S103804) Corvette. I have recently purchased a restored 1960, no rust, rolling chassis. I have some more body work to do but am starting to consider the paint. The car was Roman Red / Ermine White when I bought it but careful check shows the original color was Tasco Turquoise / Ermine White. I plan to return to the original color. My question is: aside from the external color combo, how do I find out the rest of the paint colors such as engine compartment, trunk, wheel wells, whether there are unpainted areas on the underbody of the car, etc.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi  In the engine compartment the colors are various shades of G.M. Semi Gloss.  All the parts were assembled after painting ( no paint on the bolts). Hence the various shades.  The trunk is painted the same color as your car. Tasco Turquoise and not very good ( on the top of the wheel wells will show little or no paint.  The Wheel wells are painted G.M. semi gloss ( the splash pans (front) were painted then assembled.  You need black under coating on top of the wheel wells under the car.(Quote) and not very neat.  The bottom of the body under the car has no paint and should show raw fiberglass, and no evidence of paint.   Noland Adams has a great book out that you need to purchase.  Also buy the NCRS judging guide for the 58 to 60 cars. Good luck  Thanks Larry

**********

I have an original 1957 inside mirror that has an S stamped on the shaft.  What does that S mean?

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Lynn,

GM bought parts from many sources. Most parts had a manufacturer’s identification mark on it. I used to know the names of the mirror manufacturers, and I think there were two in the fifties. Look on other pieces and you may find a logo, or a number or letter or two. It’s a matter of quality control- send GM a faulty part and you’re blacklisted.  Before he retired, I knew a Chevrolet Engineer who could look that information up for me.

 -Noland Adams

**********

Would I be right in guessing a September 1961 build on my 1962. VIN is 20867S100651.  Thank you.

 Michael

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:

Build date for #651 would be September 18, 1961.  FYI, only 20 cars built that day, the last  number was 654.

 

 

 

**********
Max,
A while back you helped me with my birthday, I am ready to stencil my car and Quanta recommends my build date at
6-18-58.
I consider your date as correct, can you confirm.
Thanks again for your great website and tech advice!

Steve

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:
Go for it, my notes say the last car built June 18, '58 was #7963.  The last car built June 19, '58 was #7991.  The last car built June 17, '58 was #7934.

Max Brockhouse, SACC President

 

 

 

**********

Hello i am doing a body off restoration on my 1958 Corvette and i know the vin numbers are on the body and the chassis but the engine does it have the same numbers on the engine as the body or should they be different and also how would i Join your Club also?

 

Thank You

From:  Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  The vin numbers were not stamped on the front engine pad until early 60.  You should have only one number on the engine pad.  It starts with F then the date it was assembled and the engine horsepower code ( with the trans). Enjoy the car.  Larry

 

 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Joe, This is a common problem with 1958 to 1962 Corvettes. There is one ground wire between the instrument cluster and chassis ground. The fuel level varies when one steps on the brakes (brake lights) and the turn signals are on. These extra electrical currents overload the ground wire, and you get a false fuel level. The cure is to add an extra ground wire between the instruments and chassis ground. Let me know how this works out.

Regards, Noland Adams


**********


I have a 1962 Corvette and did a frame off restoration. I replaced
all the wiring and put a new fuel sender unit in the gas tank. The
fuel gauge is original. The problem I have is that the fuel gauge
reads about a quarter of a tank low however, when I step on the brake
pedal and the brake light goes on the gauge reading is correct. Since
everything is new I am at a loss to what is causing this.

Thank you,
Joe

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi : This is a common problem on the cars. It is a grounding problem.

Double check your wires at the ground connection. Also you can hide a wire

going directly to ground. Enjoy Larry

**********


Hi,

> I recently purchased a 1961 corvette. Can you send me information

> on joining your club?  Can you tell

> me the date of manufacture for my car? The vin is 10867s106967.

From:  Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi: Your Vin indicates that the car was assembled in the first week of

April 1961. Have fun, Larry

 

 

 


**********
I think I am being 'jacked around' by a well known carb rebuilder.

What are the proper numbers for a 3059S Carb for 00867S104255,
Feb 26th 1960.

Thanks:
Bill

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  The Chevrolet part number is 3779178 ( with a low choke )  Hope this helps.  Enjoy the car. Larry

 

 

**********

 

 

**********

I am not a member, but I have a simple question:  What are the octane ratings for the 1962
Corvette, 327 Engine?  Do I need to run leaded fuel?  I am not sure of the horsepower, 270 to 300

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  If your engine is in good condition, I would add some lead to the fuel.  If the engine was rebuilt and has harden valve seats should be no problem, unless you are running it at high RPM's. Then you need lead.  I would add some zinc additive unless you have roller lifters. Your horsepower is either 250 or 300 with juice lifters.  Enjoy the car.  Larry

 

 

 

**********
Two questions, first, I am going to lift the body off the frame on my 61. should I remove the doors and brace the opening or can the doors just be left on the way they are. Second, I am going to replace my windshield, dash pad, and dash wiring, is there a recommended sequence or any tips? Thanks, A.J.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi; I would remove the doors and make a brace for each side to attach to the upper front hinge and the lock striker on the back. You can use theoriginal bolts to attach the supports. There is very little support on thebody through the center. I made mine form 1 inch pipe with welded flat steel on the ends, drilled to fit the holes, and the worked great. Adjust them to the exact opening of the door when the car is attached to the frame before lifting. This is the sequence I use. Remove the instrument cluster, center items, and right side grab bar. Then the windshield ( be careful as there are two bolts on each side to the back that are hard to get at) The frame and windshield come off together. Then what wiring you have remaining and them take off the old dash pad in about 1million pieces. On the installation of the new dash pad make double sure that you have the pad fit to the car before gluing it down. Both sides need to be installed for fit first. You will take off quite a lot of the foam backing for the fit. Make sure the end caps fit. The dash pad material goes under the windshield. If you have original wiring I would replace it all for safety. Good luck Larry

**********

I am the owner of a 1961 Corvette.  I am not a member yet however, I am in the process of sending in the application.  This club seems very worth while.  I have a question regarding two rubber seals that I purchased from a corvette parts supplier.  These are rectangular rubber seals which are supposed to be mounted on each side of the radiator somewhere.  They each have three small holes along the edge of the seals but I just cannot figure out where and how they mount.  I have looked at all the assembly books and manuals including Nolan's restoration book but I just can't figure out any details on where and how to mount these seals.  They seem to look like they might be used to make sure that all air is directed into the radiator but there is no indication of where to mount them.  Any ideas?
 
Mike

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  On your radiator seals, if you have an original radiator core support and the original fan shroud there are no side rubber seals on the 250hp and the 300hp cars.  Only the high horse cars had them.  The fan shroud was attached directly to the core support on the sides on these low horse cars.   Enjoy the car.  Larry. 

**********

Hi,

I found you on your solidaxle website.  I’ve got a question about a ’61 Corvette.  I am having starting problems and trying to remove the ignition to replace it.  What’s the trick to getting this out of the dash?  Is there a special tool and can I make due without it?

Any ideas are highly appreciated.

Thank you,
Jeff

 

From: Bill Herron, Treasureer of SACC:  

Jeff,
 
I believe your ignition switch is similar (if not nearly the same) as the one in my 57, so the removal procedure should be the same.  Take a paper clip and straighten out one end.  Place the ignition key in the ignition lock and turn the key all the way to the left, insert the straightened end of the paper clip into the small hole to the right of the key and push in (you may have to move the lock around a bit for just the right place).  Once you find it and push the clip in, pull the lock unit out using the key.  (At least that's how it's worked for me for the majority of my GM cars over the years.)
 
"Sebring"Bill Herron

**********

Question:  is it OK to have the pinion angle pointed upwards?  In other words is that how it should be from factory?  I have a ’58 Corvette with 2” lowering block on leaf springs, so driveshaft angle is a little sharp (maybe 6-degrees above level) at differential side.  Transmission angle is level.

  Aloha,

Eric

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Eric,

  Corvette transmissions in the fifties (like your ’58) were similar to passenger car transmissions, including Powerglide, 3 speed manual, and 4 speed manual. In a passenger car, the drive shaft was quite long. The transmission’s tailshaft (output) housing was longer, making the driveshaft a few inches shorter, which eliminated whipping of a long driveshaft. Corvette transmissions had shorter tailshaft housings because the front u-joint had an extreme angle. If a front u-joint was to be operated at such a sharp angle, the trunnions of the u-joint could jam against each other and destroy the u-joint. Chevrolet avoided this extreme u-joint angle by installing rebound straps just above each rear spring. If a Corvette drove over rough road (like a railroad crossing) the rear axle housing could only drop out of alignment a short distance, and the front u-joint never reached enough of a sharp angle to destroy itself.

  I can’t quite envision your u-joint angle as you described it. I would put the car up on a lift that has lifting points under the frame. Put the transmission in neutral and lift the car under the frame. Do not start the car while it is on the lift! The rear differential’s drop will be limited by the rebound straps or the leaf springs. Now turn the rear wheels and observe the operation of the front u-joint as the driveshaft rotates. If the u-joint has internal interference it will likely destroy itself sometime in the future.

  Get back to me if there is a problem, and perhaps I can help. You might want to remove the lowering blocks and get the rear springs rebuilt and rearched. If it were mine, I would improve the handling by: 1) remove the lowering blocks. 2) Have the rear springs rebuilt. 3) Install new Delco low pressure gas shock absorbers made for early Corvettes. These are the cheapest shocks available, and they work the best!

  Good Luck, Noland Adams

**********
Hello,

I was wondering if you could give me some guidance on removing the hubcap on a 1961 corvette.  I have a flat and want to change it.  It seems like it shoul be pretty basic, but I don't want to damage it while removing it.  thanks so much.
Steve

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Steve, I assume you are talking about the full sized wheelcover, as opposed to the small “dog dish” hubcap. The wheelcover is stamped from a thick alloy, so it thicker and heavier than it may appear. There is indented area around the outer surface of the wheelcover. The wheel itself has a number of raised “bumps” in its inner rim. These “bumps” are stamped from the inside, so they appear raised. The indented area in the edge of the wheelcover is forced over the raised bumps to install the wheelcover by tapping the edge of the wheelcover carefully with a rubber hammer. The wheel cover is removed by prying around the wheelcover with a large screwdriver. Go easy, as all you want to do is move the wheelcover over the little bump. Pry a little at several places until the wheelcover pops off.

  You are right; this material can be damaged easily, so proceed slowly.

  Good luck,

  Noland Adams

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi  Take a flat screwdriver and press it on the side that is easy between the cap and the rim.  Pry with the handle to loosen the cap, only do a small amount of lifting.  Then repeat the process several times, each time the cap will come a little further out. and you should be about a quarter to half way around the cap.  At this time the cap should come off. When you replace the cap put the cap with the valve stem first and work around both sides.  If you do have a soft rubber hammer, sit down facing the cap with your shoes off and use your  feet.  Make sure it is tight all the way around.   Enjoy the car.  Larry

**********
I have a 1961 corvette, the deck lid needs adjustment. The front part of the lid sets down about i/4 inch from the body. I do not have the weatherstrip on yet. Is there a way to adjust the lid by the springs? I have the car ready for the paint shop and wanted hood, doors and lid to fit good. Any help would be good. Jim

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Jim; First question is did the deck lid fit before the restoration? If it did it was the weather strip that held it up. If this is a different deck
lid that you have a different problem, either way you will need to make some
adjustment. You need to shim up the lid between the springs and the lid. It should fit correctly before painting. The weather strip should be soft so
that the lid compresses it to make it water tight. Be sure to check the
lock to make sure that everything fits before painting. Good Luck Enjoy thecar. Larry

**********

First of all, thank you very much for your extremely prompt reply to my earlier inquiry regarding bare 327 CSB, casting code 3782870, casting date A152, stamped FOII8RJ.  Unfortunately, I neglected to include the VIN for the car I am thinking about using this bare block for in my earlier request for technical support.   

  I have been told that my 1962 Corvette, VIN:  20867S105822, was assembled at the Saint Louis , MO assembly plant on 01/23/62.  Can you verify that build date?

  Again, thank you very much for your assistance.

  Respectfully,

  Wayne

From:  Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Wayne ,

  To determine a Corvette’s birthday I use The Corvette Birthday Book, compiled by Dennis Moore. Dennis has taken all of the known production dates and service bulletins and produced a 1953 to 1982 Corvette production date calendar. Your previous owner must have used this same reference, because I came up with the same date: Tuesday January 23, 1962.

  Now, let’s get that ’62 running!

  Later, Noland

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Last summer my dad gave me his 1959 corvette. When I was a kid it was our everyday car. It has been sitting for 10 years and I am trying to get it running. what I have found is that things have been modified. The engine has the generator mounted on the left side instead of the right (i believe it is a 1963 vette engine) the voltage reg is also on the left and not the right. my question has to do with the fuel line. I noticed the metal line runs from the back to the front of the car but was disconnected and replaced with a rubber line that goes from the sending unit to a cylinder (possibly an electronic fuel pump) mounted on the frame under the passenger seat (with an electrical wire going "somewhere") from there the rubber line goes to the fuel pump on the block then of coarse to the carb. is this normal?

  Speaking of fuel, do i just run regular unleaded when I do get it running?

  Thanks,

  JR

From: Noland Adams, Founding president of SACC:  

JR, before I recommend a grade of fuel I’d like to know more about your engine. Unless it’s a high horsepower engine with high compression and solid lifters, regular unleaded will perform well for you.

  The addition of an electric fuel pump mounted under the passenger seat is certainly unusual. Normally the metal line runs from the tank to the fuel pump, where a special flexible line is attached. Then a metal line runs from the mechanical fuel pump up the front of the engine to the carburetor. Perhaps there was a problem with vapor lock, and the electric fuel pump was added to eliminate that situation. The fuel pump wire is probably connected to the ignition switch so that when the ignition is on the fuel pump is working. If the fuel line doesn’t leak, and the electric fuel pump works, it should run okay even if the mechanical fuel pump is bad. If you have any fuel starving problems I would replace the mechanical fuel pump.

  If you want to return the fuel system to an original type system you can refer to the Restoration Book I wrote (expensive at $75.00 postage paid) or get a copy of the Assembly Instruction Manual (AIM) for about $20.00. AIMs are available at your favorite Corvette parts sources like Corvette Central or Corvette Stop at 530) 677-4270.

  I hope this helps,

  Noland Adams

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I stumbled across your site and although not yet a member would like to put out a call for your technical assistance. I just recently acquired a bare 327 engine block that I am thinking about installing in my 1962 Corvette that the former owner said was produced on 01/23/62 based upon the VIN.  It currently has no engine in it.  The engine block casting number is 3782870, with a casting date of A152.  The block has an assembly code stamped on it of F0II8RJ. 

  From the casting codes, I suspect that this block can be used to build a reasonably correct motor for my car since the block was cast on 01/15/62.  I believe that the stamped assembly code indicates that this block was cast in Flint and that at least a long block was assembled on January 18, 1962, but I don’t know what the alphabetical suffix, “RJ” means.  BTW – There is no VIN stamped on this block in front of or around the assembly code and no evidence of tampering such as milling off a previous VIN.

 

My gut is telling me that this may be a factory replacement block that was special ordered by a dealer for a warranty replacement installation or sale by their parts department, but that is just my gut talking to me.  What does the RJ suffix mean?

  Any sage opinion would be greatly appreciated.

  Very respectfully,

  Wayne 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Wayne , let’s start with what we know. You didn’t include your ‘62s serial number, so we’ll accept Jan. 23, 1962 as the car’s assembly date. 3782870 is the correct block casting number for a 1962 or 1963 327 cid Chevrolet engine. The casting date of A152 identifies the block being cast at the grey iron foundry in Saginaw , Michigan on January 15, 1962. The engine number F0118 means the engine was assembled at the Flint V8 plant on January 18th. Actually, the two ones in the date should be the capital letters “II”. We’ll get to the “RJ” suffix later.

  A calendar of events would show: engine block cast on January 15, 1962

  Engine assembled in Flint V8 plant on 0II8, which means January 18 (1962)